Faithlife Sermons

The Cross of Christ Chapter 7

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 3 views
Notes & Transcripts | Handout | Sermon Questions
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →
B. B. Warfield was right to point out that we are “assisting at the death bed of a word. It is sad to witness the death of any worthy thing—even of a worthy word. And worthy words do die, like any other worthy thing—if we do not take good care of them.” Sadder still is “the dying out of the hearts of men of the things for which the words stand.”
B. B. Warfield was right to point out that we are “assisting at the death bed of a word. It is sad to witness the death of any worthy thing—even of a worthy word. And worthy words do die, like any other worthy thing—if we do not take good care of them.” Sadder still is “the dying out of the hearts of men of the things for which the words stand.”
Read the quote above from B.B. Warfield. Of the four/five words we learned in this chapter - redemption, propitiation/expiation, justification, reconciliation - which ones are dying out? Which ones have been long dead? How would you bring them back to life?
Which “achievement of the cross” takes us into our own home and family and friends? It is the most intimate of the four words?
The fourth image of salvation, which illustrates the achievement of the cross, is “reconciliation.” It is probably the most popular of the four because it is the most personal. We have left behind us the temple precincts, the slave market and the courts of law; we are now in our own home with our family and friends.
Which “achievement of the cross” takes us into the temple courts?
The fourth image of salvation, which illustrates the achievement of the cross, is “reconciliation.” It is probably the most popular of the four because it is the most personal. We have left behind us the temple precincts, the slave market and the courts of law; we are now in our own home with our family and friends.
Propitiation - In Pauline thought, man is alienated from God by sin and God is alienated from man by wrath. It is in the substitutionary death of Christ that sin is overcome and wrath averted, so that God can look on man without displeasure and man can look on God without fear. Sin is expiated and God is propitiated.
Which “achievement of the cross” takes us into the public square?
In Pauline thought, man is alienated from God by sin and God is alienated from man by wrath. It is in the substitutionary death of Christ that sin is overcome and wrath averted, so that God can look on man without displeasure and man can look on God without fear. Sin is expiated and God is propitiated.
Redemption - We now move on from “propitiation” to “redemption.” In seeking to understand the achievement of the cross, the imagery changes from temple court to marketplace, from the ceremonial realm to the commercial, from religious rituals to business transactions. For at its most basic to “redeem” is to buy or buy back, whether as a purchase or a ransom.
Which “achievement of the cross” takes us into the court of law?
Justification - The two pictures we have so far considered have led us into the temple precincts (propitiation) and the marketplace (redemption). The third image (justification) will take us into the court of law.
How would you explain this quote to a seven year-old, like Hazel?

To “drink Christ’s blood,” therefore, describes “not participation in his life but appropriation of the benefits of his life laid down

Ephesians 2:1–10 TLV
You were dead in your trespasses and sins. At that time, you walked in the way of this world, in conformity to the ruler of the domain of the air—the ruler of the spirit who is now operating in the sons of disobedience. We too all lived among them in the cravings of our flesh, indulging the desires of the flesh and the mind. By nature we were children of wrath, just like the others. But God was rich in mercy, because of His great love with which He loved us. Even when we were dead in our trespasses, He made us alive together with Messiah. (By grace you have been saved!) And He raised us up with Him and seated us with Him in the heavenly places in Messiah Yeshua— to show in the olam ha-ba the measureless richness of His grace in kindness toward us in Messiah Yeshua. For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not from yourselves—it is the gift of God. It is not based on deeds, so that no one may boast. For we are His workmanship—created in Messiah Yeshua for good deeds, which God prepared beforehand so we might walk in them.
What is your life before Messiah (Circle in the text above)? What is your life after the Messiah (double underline in the text above)?
How would you explain to a teenager the expression, “You were dead in your trespasses and sins?”
What difference on a day-to-day basis does God’s mercy make in your life?
How do you experience “being seated in heavenly places” in your life?
Of the four words we learned in Chapter 7 which one best fits this passage? Why?
Related Media
Related Sermons