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1 Corinthians 7:10–16 NKJV
Now to the married I command, yet not I but the Lord: A wife is not to depart from her husband. But even if she does depart, let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband. And a husband is not to divorce his wife. But to the rest I, not the Lord, say: If any brother has a wife who does not believe, and she is willing to live with him, let him not divorce her. And a woman who has a husband who does not believe, if he is willing to live with her, let her not divorce him. For the unbelieving husband is sanctified by the wife, and the unbelieving wife is sanctified by the husband; otherwise your children would be unclean, but now they are holy. But if the unbeliever departs, let him depart; a brother or a sister is not under bondage in such cases. But God has called us to peace. For how do you know, O wife, whether you will save your husband? Or how do you know, O husband, whether you will save your wife?
10 Now to the married I command, yet not I but the Lord: A wife is not to depart from her husband.
Now to the married I command, yet not I but the Lord
Conclusion -
Paul is talking about the subject already addressed by Jesus Christ in Matt 5:31-32, Matt 19:9. We know Jesus, in both passages, is talking about two Christians being in a marriage together. Therefore, the following teaching applies to two Christians in a marriage where neither one of them have been put away for adultery. This is not a new command, rather a clarification of Jesus’ teaching.
Explanation -
The word "now” indicates a new subject Paul is about to address. This pattern is found throughout 1 Corinthians. The first point we need to look at is the marriage in the phrase “Now to the married...”. There are several questions that arise from this phrase: 1.) what is “married” and what is the marital status of each party of that marriage? 2.) what is the state of each party’s salvation? In answering the second question first, we can come to the conclusion that they are both Christians, in two ways, by looking at the full context of verses 10-16. In verse 12, we need to look at the phrase “but to the rest”. This, without question, is not a two-christian marriage (because?.../why?). This phrase, then, is addressing the opposing view - that one party is a Christian and the other is not. Secondly, from the phrase“...I command, yet not I but the Lord”, one must conclude Paul, being an inspired man of God, is not saying his teaching is less than doctrine, but is saying this subject was already addressed by Jesus Christ in Matt 5:31-32, Matt 19:9. These verses in Matthew clearly teach two Christians being married. In answering question 1, the word “married” is used in its (whichever) tense. This is important because it is not talking about an unsanctified marriage, rather a marriage in which both parties were and are under God’s law of marriage. Someone who was put away for adultery/fornication is not being addressed by/in these verses.
 A wife is not to depart from her husband.
Conclusion -
This is merely restating what Jesus Christ taught (Matt 5:31-32, Matt 19:8-9): divorce has been, is, and will always be unacceptable to God, except for adultery - when the guilty party is the one who is put away. Consequently, the guilty party that is put away cannot remarry, but the innocent party can (see other notes?).
Explanation -
11 But even if she does depart, let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband. And a husband is not to divorce his wife.
But even if she does depart,
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Explanation -
let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband
Conclusion -
Explanation -
And a husband is not to divorce his wife.
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Explanation -
12 But to the rest I, not the Lord, say: If any brother has a wife who does not believe, and she is willing to live with him, let him not divorce her.
But to the rest
Conclusion -
Explanation -
I, not the Lord, say: 
Conclusion -
Explanation -
If any brother has a wife who does not believe
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and she is willing to live with him
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Explanation -
 let him not divorce her.
13 And a woman who has a husband who does not believe, if he is willing to live with her, let her not divorce him.
14 For the unbelieving husband is sanctified by the wife, and the unbelieving wife is sanctified by the husband; otherwise your children would be unclean, but now they are holy.
15 But if the unbeliever departs, let him depart; a brother or a sister is not under bondage in such cases. But God has called us to peace.
Explained more directly, the Pauline Privilege is invoked under certain conditions:
First, if neither husband nor wife was baptized Christians at the time the marriage took place.
Second, if either husband or wife was baptized after the marriage had taken place, while the other party remained unbaptized.
Third, if the unbaptized person abandoned the marriage by divorce or simple departure from the marriage or was unwilling to live in peace with him or her.
 
 If these conditions are fulfilled, the original marriage may be dissolved and the Christian party is given the right to enter into marriage with another Christian “or even a nonbaptized person”. 
16 For how do you know, O wife, whether you will save your husband? Or how do you know, O husband, whether you will save your wife?
 The New King James Version (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982), 1 Co 7:10–16.
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