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Survey of the Bible

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Genesis

I. Authorship: Moses

II. Date and place of writing: 1446-1406 BC

III. Recipients: Israel

IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:

Genesis was written to record God’s choice of nation. Israel through whom He would bless all nations and bring forth a redeemer, “Christ.”

V. Book Summary in Three Words:

Generation to Joseph

VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)

1. The beginning of the humans race ( 1-11)

Creation, Corruption, Condemnation, Confusion

2. The beginning of the Hebrew race. (12-50)

Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph

VII. Characteristics of Book

The doctrinal purpose was to show that God is faithful to His promises (cf. Heb. 10:23) and to reveal that God’s plan is based on His election to Christ, who would be the Seed of the woman (Gen. 3:15), the line of Seth (Gen. 4:25), the son of Shem (Gen. 9:27), the offspring of Abraham (Gen. 12:3), Isaac (Gen. 21:12), and Jacob (Gen. 25:23), and from the tribe of Judah (Gen. 49:10).

Exodus
I. Authorship: Moses
II. Date and place of writing: 1445-1405 BC /
40 years wilderness
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Exodus is the record of Israel birth as a nation and it also lays a foundation in which God revealed His name and His attributes, redemption, His law, and how He is to worshipped.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Exit from Egypt
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The redemption of Israel (1-18)
2. The revelation of God (19-40)
VII. Characteristics of Books
The doctrinal purpose: Several important lessons are taught through the Book of Exodus. First, there is the obvious overall theme of redemption and deliverance pictured by the Passover Lamb and the Red Sea experience. Then there is the ever-present truth that obedience to God is necessary for a holy people. Finally, there is clear evidence of God’s faithfulness to the Abrahamic covenant in which He promised to bless Israel and to bring them into land of promise. (cf. Gen. 13:14f; Exod. 3:7f.).
The Christological purpose: Christ is depicted in Exodus in many ways. Like Moses, he is the great deliverer of His people (cf. Deut. 18:15). Christ is also picture in the Passover Lamb. The lamb was without flaw or blemish and was sacrificed for the sins of God’s people (Exod. 12; cf. ICor. 5:7). In the tabernacle (a portable temple) Christ is again prefigured. According to the apostle John, this portrays Christ as He “dwelt (literally, ‘pitched His tent’ ) among us” (Jn 1:14). Finally Christ is presented as our high priest who makes intercession for us (cf. Heb. 7:25).
Leviticus
I. Authorship: Moses
II. Date and Place of writing: 1405 BC / Mt. Sinai
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Leviticus was written to be a guide book to the Priest for God newly redeemed people showing them how to worship, service and obey a Holy God.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Levi & Sacrifices
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The Laws of an acceptable way to God 1-17
2. The Laws of an acceptable walk with God 18-27
VII. Characteristics of Books
The Doctrinal purpose: There are two central teachings in Leviticus. The first is that God is Holy. Second, since God is Holy, He must be approached in a prescribed way through offerings made by a priest. According to Leviticus both priestly mediation and sacrificial offerings are necessary parts of a proper worship and approach to God.
The Christological purpose: Leviticus teaches us much about Christ by way of types. In the New Testament, Christ is shown as the fulfillment of both the sacrificial system and the priestly meditation (cf. Heb. 8:10).
Numbers
I. Authorship: Moses
II. Date and Place of writing: 1444-1405 BC/Mt. Sinai to Moab
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Numbers was written to trace the history of Israel’s wandering from Sinai to Moab. It also teaches that there are no short cuts to God’s blessing and that God uses trails and tests for specific purposes in our lives.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Numbering the Hebrews
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The preparation of the old generation to inherit
the promise land. 1-10
2. The failure of the old generation to inherit the
promise land. 11-25
3. The preparation of the new generation to inherit
the promise land. 26-36
VII. Characteristics of Book
The Doctrinal purpose: There are several important truths taught in Numbers. First, the providential direction of God is clearly manifest is God who leads His people. Second, God’s perseverance for His people is shown. There are no shortcuts to God’s blessings. Trails and testing are used to temper the faith of God’s children. The hymn writer aptly says, “Trust and obey, for there’s no other way….”
The Christological purpose: There are several types or pictures of Christ in Numbers. The New Testament indicates that the Rock from which the thirsting multitude drank was Christ (ICor. 10:4). Jesus said the serpent on the stake portrayed His crucifixion (John 3:14). The daily manna pictured the Bread of Life who came down from heaven (John 6:32). Balaam foresaw that “a star shall come forth out of Jacob” (Num. 24:17). The overall presence of Christ is symbolized in Numbers by the pillar of cloud. Through this symbol He is shown as the Director of Leader of His people
Deuteronomy
I. Authorship: Moses
II. Date and Place of writing: 1405 BC
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Deuteronomy consist of a series or list of farewell message by Moses to the new generation destine to posses the promise land. Moses remind the new generation the important of obedience if they are the learn from the sad example of their parents.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Duplicate of Law
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Moses First sermon - What God has done for Israel 1-4
2. Moses Second sermon - What God expect from Israel 5-26
3. Moses Third sermon - What God will do for Israel 27-34
VII Characteristics of Book
The Doctrinal purpose: Deuteronomy provides a restatement and reinterpretation of Israel’s national laws and ordinances. It is god’s instructions on how to live a victorious life in the land of blessing. The manifest lesson is that obedience to God’s laws is necessary for the blessing and well-being of His people.
The Christological purpose: The main messianic predictions of Deuteronomy concern the scattering and restoration of Israel (30) and the prophet like Moses (Christ) whom God will raise up (18:15; cf. Acts 7:37).
Three Word Summary : Genesis
Outline:
Three Word Summary: Exodus
Outline:
Three Word Summary: Leviticus
Outline:
Three Word Summary: Numbers
Outline:
Three Word Summary: Deuteronomy
Outline:
Write on the back what you learned from each book.
Joshua
I. Authorship: Joshua
II. Date and place of writing: 1405-1390 BC
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Joshua was written to teach the children of Israel that victory come through faith in God and obedience to His word, rather that military might or numerical superiority.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Judgment on Canaan
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The conquest of Canaan 1-12
2. The settlement in Canaan 13-24
VII. Characteristics of Book
The Doctrinal purpose: There are a number of significant teachings in Joshua. The book manifests God’s faithfulness to His promises. It shows that the victorious life must be lived by faith in God. It indicates that although God’s gifts are free, we must struggles by faith to take hold of our possessions.
The Christological purpose: The name Joshua means “Jesus” or “Savior” This is how the Greek Old Testament (Septuagint or LXX) translates the title of this book. The role of Joshua as captain of his people and the one who leads them into their possessions certainly foreshadows Christ. Christ is also portrayed in the book of Joshua in the person of the commander of the army of the Lord (Joshua 5:14). The context of this passage shows that it is indeed the “angel of the Lord,” or the preincarnate Christ Himself, whose holy presence demands worship on Joshua’s part (cf. Exod. 3:2a). Finally, Christ is the inheritance of the saints (cf. Eph 1:14).
Judges
I. Authorship: Anonymous
II. Date and place or writing: 1043-1004 BC/ Canaan
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Judges record Israel’s history from Joshua to Samuel and show how Israel set aside God’s law and in it place everyone did what was right in his own eyes, resulting in corruption from within and oppression from without.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Jewish Sins Cycles
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The deterioration of Israel and failure to the complete
conquest of Canaan. 1-2
2. The deliverance of Israel during the seven sin cycles 3-16
3. The depravity of Israel in living like the Canaanites. 17-21
Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: There are a number of teachings that emerge from the Book of Judges. First, there is the obvious truth that disobedience or even incomplete obedience to God brings oppression and bondage. Second, there is evidence in the events of Judges to indicate that a theocratic nation needs a righteous king. Since this is the case, Judges provides an apologetic for the establishment of the monarchy under Saul and David. Third, Judges reveals the truth that God responds in deliverance to the repentance and prayers of His oppressed people. This teaches the long-suffering and love of God for His people.
The Christological purpose: Each judge was a statesman-savior. They served as spiritual and political deliverers. As such they represent the role Christ has as the Savior-King of His people. The need for a Righteous King is everywhere apparent in Judges, and Christ is indeed the “Righteous One.”
Ruth
I. Authorship: Uncertain
II. Date and place of writing: 10th Century BC
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
The book of Ruth records the life of a Mobite women who forsakes her pagans heritage in order to cling to the people of Israel and the God of Israel. Because of her faithfulness in a time of national faithlessness, God rewards her by giving her a new husband (Boaz) a son (Obed, and a privileged position in the lineage of David and Christ).
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Romance of Redemption
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Ruth love demonstrated 1-2
2. Ruth love rewarded 3-4
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: One very significant doctrinal emphasis of the Book of Ruth is its demonstration of the functions of the law concerning the Kinsman Redeemer (Ruth 4 cf., Deut 25:5f). Ruth also present the doctrine of the divine origin of the kingdom of David and contains one of the finest examples of filial love and piety in literature.
The Christological purpose: The Book of Ruth beautifully portrays several messianic purposes. It show how Christ, our kinsman Redeemer, purchases us for Himself. It also illustrates the grace of God as Ruth the Gentile is brought into the line of the messianic blessing (see Matt 1:5).
I Samuel
I. Authorship: Anonymous
II. Date and Place of writing: 930 BC
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject / Purpose Statement
I Samuel provides the crucial link from the judges to the monarch. It also faces the transition of leadership in Israel to the last judge (Samuel) to the first king (Saul).
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Samuel and Saul
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture):
1. Samuel the last Judge 1-7
2. Saul the First King 8-31
VII. Characteristics of Books:
The doctrinal purpose : There are several spiritual lessons in Samuel. First, Saul is a tragic lesson of the truth that “to obey is better than sacrifice” (I Sam 15:22). Second, Saul is a notorious example of the words of Hosea: “I have given you kings in my anger, and I have taken them away in my wrath.” (Hos 13:11). Third, David is a classic example of the truth that “the Lord sees not as man sees” (I Sam 16:7). Finally, the choice of David as king reveals the divine origin of the messianic house of David, that is of the family through whom the Messiah would one day come (II Sam 7:12f).
The Christological purpose: Samuel is the first Biblical book to use the word anointed (I Sam 2:10), which is the origin of the word messiah, that is, one anointed to be king. The primary messianic theme in Samuel is the coming Messiah, the Son of David, (II Sam 7:12f, cf. Matt. 21:9 ;22:45).
II Samuel
I. Authorship: Anonymous
II. Date and place or writing: 930 BC
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
II Samuel was originally written as one book with first Samuel to provide a divine perspective on the establishment of the United Kingdom under Saul and its expansion under David. The writer also give a good candid portrait of the strengths and weaknesses of David’s 40’s year reign.
V. Book Summary in three words: Summary of David
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture):
1. The triumphs of David 1-10
2. The transgression of David 11
3. The trouble of David 12-34
VII. Characteristics of Books
I Kings
I. Authorship: Anonymous
II. Date and place of writing: 550 BC
III. Recipients: Remaining Kingdom of Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
I Kings records the death of David and the glory failure, and division of Solomon’s empire. It also records the events of the first eight kings of Israel and the first four king of Judah.
V. Book Summary in three words: Kingdom is Divided
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture):
1. The United Kingdom 1-11
2. The Divided Kingdom 12-22
Characteristics of Book
The Doctrinal Purpose: While the record of these books is primarily historical, another purpose is obviously moral teaching. The central doctrinal teaching is that conformity to the law of God brings prosperity while apostasy leads to captivity.
The Christological purpose: The messianic implication of Kings is clear: despite human sin and failure God is faithful to the Davidic covenant (II Sam 7). The Messiah will come through the tribe of Judah and will be a son of David; the throne of Israel will be preserved. Further, there is in Kings a beautiful illustration of the splendor of the coming of Christ it of Christ in the person of Solomon. Indeed, with the coming of Christ it was truly said, someone “greater than Solomon is here” (Matt 12:42).
II Kings
I. Authorship: Anonymous
II. Date and place of writing: 550 BC
III. Recipients: Remaining Kingdom of Judah
IV. Subject / Purpose Statement
II Kings continue to record the Kings of Israel and Judah (27 total) down to the captivity of Israel by Assyria in 722 BC and the destruction of Judah and Jerusalem by Babylon in 586 BC.
V. Book Summary in three words: Kingdoms taken Captive
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The divided Kingdom 1-17
2. The surviving Kingdom 18-25
VII. Characteristics of Book
I Chronicles
I. Authorship: Ezra
II. Date and place of writing: 450-425
III. Recipients: Returned Remnant
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
First Chronicles was written from a priestly prospective on historical event beginning with a royal line of David and then tracing the spiritual significance of David righteous reign.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Commentary on II Samuel
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The royal line of David 1-9
2. The reign of David 10-29
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: Three teachings stand out in the record of Chronicles. (1) The faithfulness of God in keeping His promises to His people, (2) the powerfulness of the Word of God, and (3) the essential and central role of worship in the life of God’s people.
The Christological purpose: There are two dominant Christological themes in Chronicles, one more explicit than the other: first, there is the obvious recording of the Davidic kings and their descendants through whom the Messiah was to come )cf. Matt.1 and Luke 3) Second, there is the less explicit but highly important testimony concerning the typlolgical significance of the Temple as it points to Jesus Christ, who said, “T tell you, something greater than the temple is here” (Matt 12:6). John added of the New Jerusalem, “And I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb” (Rev 21:22).
II Chronicles
I. Authorship: Ezra
II. Date and place of writing: 450-425 BC
III. Recipients: Returned Remnant
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Second Chronicles continues the record of historical event written from a priestly prospective beginning with King Solomon and tracing his successors in Judah; thus exceeding those in Israel.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Commentary on Kings
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The reign of Solomon 1-9
2. The reign of the Kings of Judah 10-36
VII. Characteristics of Books
Ezra
I. Authorship: Ezra
II. Date and place of writing: 464-423 BC
III. Recipients: Returning remnant of Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
The book of Ezra records the story of the two returns from Babylonian. The first led by Zerubbable to rebuild the temple and the second under the leadership of Ezra to rebuild the spiritual condition of the people.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Erections of Temple
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The restoration of the temple of God 1-6
2. The reformation of the people of God 7-10
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: One of the main teachings of these books is the faithfulness of God to His covenant promises to Judah. God had promised them a land and religious center in Jerusalem as well as a return after seventy years of captivity (Jer 25), and He kept His promises. Further, as in Chronicles, Ezra the priest reflects here the centrality of the Temple worship to the whole life of the Jewish nation. Another obvious lesson in these books is the power of prayer (Ezra 9; Neh 9) and of the Word of God (Neh 8).
The Christological purpose: God had promised David to keep his line of descendants alive, for one of them, the Messiah, the Son of David, would one day reign on his throne in Jerusalem. Ezra-Nehemiah shows how God kept this hope alive by repatriating His people.
Nehemiah
I. Authorship: Nehemiah & Ezra
II. Date and place of writing: 464-424 BC
III. Recipients: the returning remnant of Judah
IV. Subject / Purpose Statement
The book of Nehemiah records the third and last returns to Jerusalem after the Babylonian exile. It also show how Nehemiah challenged his countrymen to arise and rebuild the shattered walls of Jerusalem under his leadership.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: New City Walls
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The reconstruction of the wall 1-7
2. The reconstruction of the people 8-13
VII. Characteristics of Book
Esther
I. Authorship: Anonymous
II. Date and place of writing: 465-455 BC
III. Recipients: Jews
IV. Subject /Purpose Statement
The writer of the book of Esther provides the only biblical portrait of the vast majority of Jews who chose to remain in Persia rather than return to Palestine after the exile.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Escape of Jews
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The threat of the Jews 1-4
2. The triumph of the Jews 5-10
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The primary doctrinal lesson concerns the providential care of God for His own. A subsidiary but important theme is the truth stated later in Luke 14:11; “Every one who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humble himself will be exalted.”
The Christological purpose: Esther show that God has not forgotten the Jews who did not return. Predictions of a second return (e.g., Isa 11:11), which has in fact been in the process of fulfillment since before 1947 (when the modern state of Israel was re-established), indicated that indeed the nation was to be reborn some day in the future. According to Revelation 7 & 14 there will be in Palestine in the end time thousands from every tribe. Esther, whose name means “star” is a beautiful picture of Christ. both put themselves in the place of death for their people but received the scepter of the King’s approval (5:1f.).
Job
I. Authorship: Unknown
II. Date and place of writing: Before 1500 BC
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject Purpose Statement
The writer record Job’s experience of suffering and how he learned to properly responses to God in a submissive trust regardless of the circumstance of life because God is in sovereign control.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Jehovah and Suffering
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The dilemma of Job 1-2
2. The debates of Job 3-37
3. The deliverance of Job 38-42
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The central teaching of Job appears to be that the presence of pain is allowed by the providence of God for the purifying and perfecting of His people.
The Christological purpose: Christ is presented or anticipated in several ways in Job. Job cries out for a Mediator (9:33; 33:23); he acknowledges a Redeemer (19:25); and he knows he needs someone who can explain the mystery of “suffering by suffering, the just for the unjust.”(I Peter 3:18) and thus bring victory over the plague of evil and plan (Rev 21:4).
Psalms
I. Authorship: Over a half dozen
II. Date and place of writing: 1410-430 BC
III. Recipients : Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
The Psalms are 150 songs designed for vocal expression and instrumental accompaniment and served as the temple hymn book and devotional guide for the Hebrew people. The common theme is Worship, God is worthy of all praise because of who He is, what He done, and what He will do.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Praises and Petition
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Book I 1-41
2. Book II 42-72
3. Book III 73-89
4. Book IV 90-106
5. Book V 107-150
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: All the great doctrines of the Old Testament are taught in the Psalms, especially the doctrine of God. Perhaps the a easiest way to summarize the great teachings of the Psalms is to refer to the topics of the five sections into which they are divided.
The Christological purpose: Psalms is perhaps the most messianic book in the Old Testament. Practically the whole of Christ’s life and ministry can be found there.
Proverbs
I Authorship: Solomon and Others
II Date and place of writing: 950 - 700 BC
III Recipients: The students of Solomon and others
IV Subject/Purpose Statement:
The book of Proverbs was designed to equip the reader in practical wisdom, discernment, discipline, and discretion. These wise sayings emphasize the development of skill in all the details of life so that beauty and righteousness will replace foolishness and evil as we walk in dependence upon God.
V Book Summary in Three Words: Prudence in Life
VI Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The Commendation of Wisdom 1
2. The Counsel of Wisdom 2 - 29
3. The Comparisons of Wisdom 30 - 31
VII Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The primary teaching of the wisdom literature is that true wisdom is based is the fear (reverential trust) of God. That is, prudence is based in piety (1:7). Teaching on other matters, including sex, friends, and money, are both invaluable and numerous.
The Christological purpose: Christ is presented in Proverbs as the Wisdom for which the wise man aspires (cf. Proverbs 8) The New Testament declares that Christ was “made our wisdom” (I Cor 1:30) and that is Christ “are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Col 2:3)
Ecclesiastes
I. Authorship: Solomon
II. Date and place of writing: 935 BC
III. Recipients: The wise men of the assemble
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Solomon carefully chose wise words describing that life and work are a gift from God. Looking at life under the sun, Solomon says life’s pursuit without God lead only to frustration. But once seen from God’s perspective life become meaningful and fulfilling.
V. Book Summary in Three Words Emptiness in Life
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The declaration that all is vanity 1
2. The demonstration that all is vanity 2-6
3. The deliverance from vanity 7-12
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: (1) The fundamental teaching of the book is twofold: negatively, no true happiness is found in what this world has to offer and, positively, true satisfaction is found only in God. (2) In its basic teaching, namely, that the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom (cf. 12:13), Ecclesiates is in accord with the rest of the wisdom literature of the Old Testament. (3) Included within its basic teachings are many other doctrines such as God’s sovereignty (4), human depravity &7:29), divine sagacity (wisdom), and death’s finality (3:17,20).
The Christological purpose: The person of Christ stands out in two significant ways in Ecclesiates (1) He is the greatest good, the ultimate satisfaction for which the believer aspires (cf. John 4:13,14). (2) Christ is the “one Shepherd” or teacher from whom the wisdom of this book comes (12”11; cf. John 10:1 and Col 2:3). In brief, Christ is both the Water of life that quenches our thirst for happiness and the Wisdom of God that satisfies our desire for knowledge.
Song of Solomon
I. Authorship: Solomon
II. Date and place of writing: 965 BC
III. Recipients: Shulamite Women
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Song of Solomon is a love song written by Solomon which records Solomon actual romance with a shulamite woman. The book exalts the joys of love, courtship and marriage and teaches that physical beauty and sexuality in marriage should not be despised.
V. Book Summary in Three Words Sex in Marriage
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Falling in Love 1-2
2. United in Love 3-4
3. Struggles in Love 5-6
4. Growing in Love 7-8
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The central teaching of the book concerns the nature of the union of lover and beloved. Hence, both compassion and union, love and oneness, are at the core of the doctrinal statement of the Song. Following from this, of course, are both a rebuke to polygamy and a reaffirmation of monogamous love as God’s ideal for mankind.
The Christological purpose: Solomon’s love for his bride is a most beautiful illustration of Christ’s love for His church (Eph 5:25f) Further the bride’s growth in love depicts the believer’s maturation in the love of Christ, a growing realization of His acceptance of us in love. Truly, no book of the Bible is more holy and more sacred, yet few are more often scorned and rejected. Nevertheless, the aspiration for union with Christ in love is nowhere more fully and descriptively illustrated in all of Scripture.
Isaiah
I. Authorship: Isaiah
II. Date and place of writing: 740-680 BC
III. Recipients: Israel / Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Isaiah record that judgment would come to Judah because of a failure to keep the covenant but promised that God would deliver the nation through the coming Messiah.
V. Book Summary in Three Word: Israel Suffering/Glory
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The prophecy of condemnation 1-35
2. The parenthesis concerning Hezekiah 36-39
3. The prophecy of comfort 40-66
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: This book comprehends all the great truths of the Old Testament regarding salvation from man’s sin (1) through Christ’s redemptive work (53) as well as the final glorious restoration of this earth (65).
The Christological purpose: Isaiah presents perhaps the most complete and comprehensive descriptions of Christ found in the Old Testament. For example, Christ is referred to as the “Lord”….high and lifted up” (6); the son of a virgin (7:14); the “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace” (9:6): a Branch from Jessie and Anointed of the Lord (11:1,2); the “Comfort” of His people (40); the “Redeemer” and “Holy one of Israel” and their Creator and King (43); the Deliverer of the captives (61) and more.
Jeremiah
I. Authorship: Jeremiah
II. Date and place of writing: 627-580 BC
III. Recipients: Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Jeremiah recorded that judgment would come on the nation because of failure to keep the covenant but prophesied that restoration would occur because of God would deliver the nation through the coming messiah.
V. Book Summary in Three Word: Judgment on Judah
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The prophecies to Judah 1-45
2. The prophecies to the Gentiles 46-51
3. The punishment to Jerusalem 52
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The book lays great stress on morality and on the supremacy of the one God (as opposed to idolatry). It teaches that “righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people” (Prov 14:34).
The Christological purpose: There are many presentations of Christ: He is the fountain of living water (2:13); cf. Jn 4:14), the balm of Gilead (8:22), the Good Shepherd (23:4), a righteous branch (23:5), and the Lord our righteousness (23:6). Overall He is the weeping Prophet to His people (cf. Matt 23:37,38).
Lamentations
I. Authorship: Jeremiah
II. Date and place of writing: 586 BC in Jerusalem
III. Recipients: Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Jeremiah recorded five poems of judgment and destruction which had come on the nation because of neglect of the covenant.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Lament over Jerusalem
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The plight of Jerusalem 1
2. The punishment of God 2
3. The plea of Jeremiah 3
4. The portrait of the battle 4
5. The prayer for restoration 5
VII Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: Lamentations is an unusual but compatible mixture of the wrath and mercy of God. It stresses His faithfulness to His promise to punish evil and yet His steadfast love and compassion for His people (3:22,23).
The Christological purpose: There are many prophetic pictures of Christ. Christ is the afflicted of the Lord (1:12), despised of His enemies (2:15,16), the laughingstock of all people (3:14), and the smitten and insulted one (3:19). But behind the movement of the whole book, Christ is the man of sorrow who is acquainted with grief (cf. Isa 53:3).
Ezekiel
I. Authorship: Ezekiel
II. Date and Place of writing: Babylon 592-570 BC
III. Recipients: Jews in exile in Babylon
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Ezekiel the prophet of vision record messages of judgment because the people had not kept the covenant and also messages of a coming glorious kingdom.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Expectation of Glory
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Judgment on Judah 1-24
2. Judgment on the Gentles 25-32
3. The joy of the Israel 33-48
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The central doctrinal teaching of Ezekiel concerns the glory of God (cf. 1:28; 10:4). Connected with God’s glory is the need for judgment of sin in the vindication of His righteousness (c.f. 11:12). And finally the book stresses God’s faithfulness to His promises (cf. “for my name’s sake,” (20:44).
The Christological purpose: Ezekiel anticipates Christ as the glory of God (10:18,19), the Renewed of the covenant (16:60), the shepherd of the flock (34:23), the Cleanser of the Temple (36:24f) the Regenerator of Israel (36:26); and throughout the book He is presented as the Restorer of Israel.
Daniel
I. Authorship: Daniel
II. Date and Place of writing: Babylon 606-536 BC
III. Recipients: Jews in exile
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Daniel wrote to encourage the exited Jews and to record the history of the world as it related to Israel during and after the period of Gentile domination.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Daniel and Prophecy
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The personal history of Daniel 1-7
2. The prophetic ministry of Daniel 8-12
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: There is a twofold stress in the teaching of this book: it condemns the existing (beastly) powers of this world and at the same time communicates the plan of God to set up His Kingdom in this world. In so doing Daniel emphatically teaches that history has a goal, that it is His-story, and that God is sovereign over the affairs of this world (cf. Chpt 4)..
The Christological purpose: The chief portrait of Christ in Daniel is the coming Messiah (the anointed one, 9:26). But Christ is also portrayed as the great stone who will crush the kingdoms of this world (2:34,45), the son of man (7:12). The first section centers largely around the dreams of Nebuchadnezzar while the second part revolves around the visions of Daniel himself.
Hosea
I. Authorship: Hosea
II. Date and place of writing: 755-710 BC
III. Recipients: Northern Kingdom of Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Hosea, using the figure of an unfaithful wife, noted that the northern kingdom had been unfaithful to the covenant and therefore would be judged in order to stimulate the nation to turn back to God which would result in blessings under the covenant.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Hesed Loyal Love
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The adulteress wife and faithful husband 1-3
2. The adulteress nation and faithful Lord 4-14
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The futility of formalism, the depravity of man, and the unending charity of God are three strong emphases of the Book of Hosea.
The Christological purpose: The Messiah is presented as the Son of God (11:1), the only Savior of His people (L3:4), the one who will ransom us from the dead (13:14; cf. ICor 15:55), but primarily as our compassionate lover (11:4) and the healer of the backslider (6:1).
Joel
I. Authorship: Joel
II. Date and place of writing: 835 BC
III. Recipients: Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Joel, using the figure of a locust invasion, prophesied that there will be a future invasion of the land by many nation in order to charge the people to repent which would result in blessings under the covenant.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Jehovah Judgment Day
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The day of the Lord in retrospect 1
2. The day of the Lord in prospect 2-3
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: Two teachings are central: the day of the Lord (judgment) and the coming of the Spirit of the Lord (blessing).
The Christological purpose: Christ is presented as the one who gives the Holy Spirit (2L28), who judges the nations (3:2,12), and who is the Refuge and Stronghold for His people (3:16).
Amos
I. Authorship: Amos
II. Date and place of writing: 760-753 BC
III. Recipients: Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Amos related messages of judgment against the northern kingdom showing that the unrighteous behavior of the people and their formalism revealed that they were not living according to the covenant in order to encourage the righteous remnant (of both the north and south) to live under the covenant because the Lord will restore them.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Attitude toward Law
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The eight prophecy of judgment 1-2
2. The three sermon of judgment 3-6
3. The five vision of judgment 7-8
4. The five promise of restoration 9
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: The book teaches god’s hatred of evil, His jealousy for His own good, and the sanctity of His law. On the last point there are numerous references in Amos to the law of Mosses(cf.2:7 with Deut. 23:17, 2:8 with Exod. 22:26; 2:2,12 with Num. 6:1-21).
The Christological purpose: The book presents Christ as the Rebuilder of David’s Tabernacle (9:11, ASV) and the Husbandman of His people ((:13).
Obadiah
I. Authorship: Obadiah
II. Date and place of writing: 840 BC
III. Recipients: Israel and Edom
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Obadiah declared that Edom (as a nation and symbolizing the anti-God in activity on the world) will be destroyed in order to encourage Israel to realize that they will be the center of the future kingdom of God.
V. Book Summary in three Words: Obliteration of Edom
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The prediction of the judgment of Edom. vv1-18
2. The prediction of the restoration of Israel. vv 19-21
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: This tiny book declares the justice of God, His faithfulness in restoring the land given to Abraham, and the perils of anti-Semitism. It teaches that pride comes before a fall (cf. 10:12).
The Christological purpose: The book pictures the Messiah as both Savior and possessor of the kingdom (21).
Jonah
I. Authorship: Jonah
II. Date and place of writing: 760 BC
III. Recipients: Assyrian and Israel
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Jonah, the reluctant prophet does not want to proclaim God’s message for fear that the Assyrians will respond and be spared by the compassionate God of Israel. Jonah reveals the power of God in nature and the mercy of God in human affairs.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Judgment Spared Nineveh
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Jonah the prodigal prophet 1
2. Jonah the praying prophet 2
3. Jonah the preaching prophet 3
4. Jonah the pouting prophet 4
VII. Characteristics of Books
The doctrinal purpose: Jonah teaches the universality of God’s salvation; the need for obedience to God, the secret of true revival by repentance from sin, and the truth that “salvation is of the Lord” (2:9, KJV).
The Christological purpose: the New Testament mentions Jonah as the type of Christ’s resurrection (Matt. 12:40). Through Jonah, Christ is pictured as a prophet to the nations, while in Jonah’s life He is shown as the Savior and Lord (2:9).
Micah
I. Authorship: Micah
II. Date and place of writing: 735-710 BC
III. Recipients: Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Micah declared that even though Judah will go in to captivity in Babylon for not living under the covenant they will be brought back under a king into a kingdom in order to encourage the righteous remnant to continue to live righteously.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Messenger of Hope
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The prediction of retribution 1-3
2. The prediction of restoration 4-5
3. The plea for repentance 6-7
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: Several important teaching are stressed including God’s hatred of empty formal religion (6:7), His concern for social justice (6:8), His pardoning grace (7:18), and His faithfulness to His covenants (7:20).
The Christological purpose: The book presents Christ as the God of Jacob (4:2), the Judge of the nations (4:3), and the Ruler in Israel who will be born in the city of Bethlehem (5:2; cf. Matt 2:1-6).
Nahum
I. Authorship: Nahum
II. Date and place of writing: 660-607 BC
III. Recipients: Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Nahum prophesied destruction on the Assyrian empire in order to encourage Israel that God is in control and will fight for His people.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Nineveh Soon Judgment
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The destruction of Nineveh is decreed 1
2. The destruction of Nineveh is describe 2
3. The destruction of Nineveh is deserved 3
VII Characteristics Book
The doctrinal purpose: This book manifest both the justice of God in dealing with evil and the goodness of God in the eyes of the righteous. It dramatizes the truths, “The wicked shall depart to sheol (Hell), all the nations that forget God” (Ps (:17), and “Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord” (Rom 12:19).
The Christological purpose: Nahum sees Christ as the jealous God (1:2) and the Avenger of His advertises.
Habakkuk
I. Authorship: Habakkukk
II. Date and place of writing: 607 BC
III. Recipients: Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Habakkuk records series of question and answers as a result of a conversation between himself and God. He uses this conversation to comfort the fateful in Judah with assurance that the wicked and lawless men of Judah will not go unpunished, and that God, being just will punish the evil Babylonians.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Humanity and Sovereignty
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The problem of Habakkuk 1-2
2. The praise of Habakkuk 3
VII. Characteristics Book
The doctrinal purpose: To teach the holiness and justice of God and the necessity of faith for the righteous, to show that God is just and that the just live by faith in Him: these were the doctrinal purpose.
The Christological purpose: Christ is pictured as the Holy One (1:12), the one who justifies the righteous by faith (2:4), and the one who will someday fill the earth “with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the water cover the sea” (2:14).
Zephaniah
I. Authorship: Zephaniah
II. Date and place of writing: 630 BC
III. Recipients: Judah
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Zephaniah described a time of intense judgment on Judah and the nation in order to lead Judah to repent and to encourage the remnant to rejoice that the judgment leads to salvation and entrance into the Kingdom.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Zion’s Remnant Saved
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The judgment in the day of the Lord. 1-2
2. The salvation in the day of the Lord 3
VII. Characteristics Book
The doctrinal purpose: Zephaniah teaches that God desires to demonstrates His holiness and hence will be just in executing judgment on the world. In this regard, the prophet Zephaniah stresses “the day of the Lord” (ch 1). Nonetheless, God will be faithful to all in every nation who call upon Him (cf. Rom 10:13). Further, God will keep His promise and restore the fortunes of Israel, regathering them as an nation (3:20).
The Christological purpose: The Savior is presented as the righteous Lord within Israel (3:5), the witness against the nations (3:8), and “the King of Israel, the Lord” (3:15).
Haggai
I. Authorship: Haggai
II. Date and place of writing: 520 BC
III. Recipients: Jews who returned to Jerusalem from Babylon
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Haggai preached four messages to the remnant to encourage them to rebuild the temple in hope that they could once again enjoy the blessings of the glory and presence of God. A further purpose explains the reason for their poverty and why their sacrifices have been previously unacceptable to God.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: House of God
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The message concerning construction 1
2. The message concerning courage 2
3. The message concerning cleanness 2
4. The message concerning consummation 2
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: There are many lessons in Haggai: (1) God blesses His people when they put Him first (cf., Matt 6:33); (2) When we are in God’s service we should never “weary in well doing” (cf. Gal 6:9); (3) God’s promise for tomorrow is our hope for today.
The Christological purpose: Our Lord is represented as the Restorer of the temple’s glory (2:7-9), the overthrower of the kingdoms of this world (2:22), and a signet ring for Israel (2:23).
Zechariah
I. Authorship: Zechariah
II. Date and place of writing: 520-480 BC
III. Recipients: Jews who returned to Jerusalem from Babylon
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Zechariah recorded eight visions, four messages and two burdens which were written to encouraged the returned remnant to live according to the covenant and to rebuild the temple because kingdom through the destruction of the Gentile empires and the salvation of His people Israel.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Zion’s Coming Messiah
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The eight vision of Zechariah 1-6
2. The four messages of Zechariah 7-8
3. The two burden of Zechariah 9-14
VII. Characteristics Book
The doctrinal purpose: Several teachings stand out in Zechariah: the centrality of the Temple in God’s spiritual restoration of Israel; (2) the providence of God in bringing back His people to their land; (3) the preeminence of the Messiah in the future spiritual restoration of Israel.
The Christological purpose: Zechariah presents s Christ as the angle of the Lord (3:1), the Righteous Branch (3:8), the Crucified Savior (12:10) and the coming king (9:9).\
Malachi
I. Authorship: Malachi
II. Date and place of writing: 432-425 BC
III. Recipients: Jews who returned to Jerusalem from Babylon
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Malachi records YaHWeH’s burden for Israel through a series of rhetorical question and answers, which were designed to prompt the remnant to repentance from their spiritual indifference and to promise the judgment and blessings to come through the Messiah.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Messaged before Messiah
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The privilege of the nation 1
2. The pollution of the nation 2-3
3. The promise of the nation 4
VII. Characteristics of Book
The doctrinal purpose: Malachi teaches that unless there is purity in God’s people there will be purging by God’s hand. It stresses that sincerity and purity and prerequistes for serving God.
The Christological purpose: Christ is the messenger of the covenant (3:1), the refiner’s fire (3:2), and the usn of righteousness (4:2).
Matthew
I. Authorship: Matthew (gift of God)
II. Date and place of writing: Palestine - 55-70 AD
III. Recipients: Jews
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Matthew recorded selected events from the life and ministry of Jesus Christ in order to confirm to a Jewish audience that Jesus was indeed the Messiah and to explain the Kingdom program of God for the present in light of Israel’s rejection of her King.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Messiah Is King
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The presentation of the King 1-4
2. The Proclamation of the King 5-11
3. The Progressive rejection of the King 12-25
4. The Passion and Proof of the King 26-28
(The last week of his life- the things that led up to His death. The proof that He is King - The resurrection)
VII. Characteristics of Book
1. The book of Matthew beings with a genealogy.
2. Matthew dwells on Massianic prophecies that emphasizes the King. (Jesus as King)
3. Matthew does not explain Jewish costumes.
4. The Hebrew formula “Kingdom of Heaven” is used 28 times in the book of Matthew.
5. Matthew writhes this book in a orderly format. Like the Pentateuch, it is broken down into five sections.
a. Sermon on the Mount 5-7
b. Communion of the twelve 10
c. Parables of the Kingdom 13
d. The meaning of greatness and forgiveness 18
e. Olivet Discourse (future events) 24-25
Mark
I. Authorship: Mark (Surname) John
II. Date and Place of writing: 50-68 AD
III. Recipients: Romans
IV. Subject/ Purpose Statement
Mark recorded selected events from the life and ministry of Jesus Christ to present the Gospel to a Roman audience by proving that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and to provide a pattern of discipleship through the model of the suffering servant who remains faithful even unto death.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Messiah is Servant
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Jesus Christ is servant to the multitudes 1-7
2. Jesus Christ is servant to the disciplines 8-10
3. Jesus Christ is sacrificed for the world 11-16
VII. Characteristics of Book
1. Mark is intended for the unevangelized Roman audience.
2. Mark explains Jewish customs and translates Aramaic words.
3. The shortest gospel and some people think that it is the first written.
4. No introduction, no genealogy, no long discourses.
5. Repeatedly notes the presence of the multitudes around Jesus.
Luke
I. Authorship: Luke
II. Date and place of writing: 60 AD
III. Recipients: The Greeks, especially Theophilus
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Luke provided an orderly account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ for gentile readership in order to certify that Jesus was the promised Messiah for Israel and was indeed the Son of God, who became the Son of Man in order to provide the way for the Gentiles to enter the Kingdom as well as Israel.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Likeness of Man
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture):
1. The Son of man seeking the lost 1-19
2. The Son of man saving the lost 20-24
VII. Characteristics of Book
1. Luke is the longest, most orderly and most detailed Gospel.
2. Luke is the longest book in the New Testament.
3. Luke carefully notes dates, customers and geographical date, “locations and institutions.”
4. Luke records the prayer life of Jesus. (nine prayers of Jesus are recorded in the Gospel of Luke).
5. Luke recorded many miracles and parables.
A. 20 Miracles are recorded (6 of which are only found in Luke).
B. 23 Parables are recorded (19 of which are only found in Luke).
6. Only Luke recorded the Emmaus Road narrative.
7. Luke stresses the birth of Christ through the line of Mary.
8. Luke places emphasis on Jesus as Son of Man (Luke 2:51 & 52)
John
I. Authorship: John (the Apostle) “The Beloved”
II. Date and place of writing: 85-90 AD Asia Minor
III. recipients: All the World
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
John recorded a selected number of signs and saying of Jesus in order to persuade His audience that Jesus was the Messiah, the Son of God, who could give them eternal life if they would only believe in Him.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Jesus is God
VI. book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The public ministry of the Son of God 1-12
2. The private ministry of the Son of God 13-17
3. The passion ministry of the Son of God 18-20
4. The post-lude ministry of the Son of God 21
VII. Characteristics of Book:
1. Half of the book is taken up with the last week of the life of Christ.
2. Theme words that are in the book are: Light, Life, Love, Believe. The word believe is recorded in the book of John over 98 times.
3. The book of John records no parables.
4. The book of John records seven major miracles, seven major witnesses and seven major statements of who Jesus said He was.
Quiz!
Name___________
Matthew
I. Authorship: ____________(gift of God)
II. Date and place of writing: Palestine - 55-70 AD
III. Recipients: _______
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Matthew recorded selected events from the life and ministry of Jesus Christ in order to confirm to a _______ audience that Jesus was indeed the __________ and to explain the Kingdom program of God for the present in light of Israel’s rejection of her King.
V. Book Summary in Three Words:
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The P___________ of the King 1-4
2. The P____________ of the King 5-11
3. The P__________ rejection of the King 12-25
4. The P______ and P____ of the King 26-28
Mark
I. Authorship: ____ (Surname) John
II. Date and Place of writing: 50-68 AD
III. Recipients: _________
IV. Subject/ Purpose Statement
Mark recorded selected events from the life and ministry of Jesus Christ to present the Gospel to a ______
Mark cont…
audience by proving that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and to provide a pattern of discipleship through the
model of the s_______ s_______ who remains faithful even unto death.
V. Book Summary in Three Words:
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Jesus Christ is s______ to the m_________ 1-7
2. Jesus Christ is s______ to the d__________ 8-10
3. Jesus Christ is s_________ for the w____ 11-16
Luke
I. Authorship:
II. Date and place of writing: 60 AD
III. Recipients: The Greeks, especially T________
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Luke provided an _______ account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ for gentile readership in order to certify that Jesus was the promised Messiah for Israel and was indeed the Son of God, who became the Son of Man in order to provide the way for the Gentiles to enter the Kingdom as well as _______.
V. Book Summary in Three Words:
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture):
1. The Son of man ________the lost. 1-19
2. The Son of man ________the lost. 20-24
John
I. Authorship: _____(the Apostle) “The Beloved”
II. Date and place of writing: 85-90 AD Asia Minor
III. Recipients:
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
John recorded a selected number of signs and saying of Jesus in order to persuade His audience that Jesus was the M______, the ___of ___, who could give them eternal life if they would only ________in Him.
V. Book Summary in Three Words:
VI. book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The p_____ ministry of the Son of God 1-12
2. The p______ ministry of the Son of God 13-17
3. The p ______ ministry of the Son of God 18-20
4. The p___-___ ministry of the Son of God 21
Acts
I. Authorship: Luke
II. Date and place of writing: 60 AD / Ceseria and Rome
III. Recipients: Theophilus
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Luke provided an accurate account of the spread of the gospel and the establishment of the Church to persuade his audience that selected promises of the resurrected Christ were fulfilled and to provide sound defense for the church, its messages and its messengers.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Apostles of Church
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The witness to Jerusalem 1-7
2. The witness to Judea and Samaria 8-12
3. The witness to the ends of the earth 13-28
VII. Characteristics of Book
1. The book of Acts places emphasis upon the work of the Holy Spirit.
2. Luke also places emphasis on the power and the progress of the church.
3. There are a prominence of persons in the book of Acts (110 are named).
4. There are two spokesperson in the Book of Acts.
a. Peter (1-12)
b. Paul (13-28
5. Acts also emphasizes the importance of places. At least 80 geographical locations are
mentioned.
6. In each of the sermons given in the book of Acts, there is emphasis placed on the
resurrection of Christ.
7. The book of Acts also places emphasis upon the promises of Christ being fulfilled.
A . Holy Spirit B. The Church age.
Romans
I. Authorship: Paul
II. Date and place of writing: 57 AD Paul’s 3rd Journey
III. Recipients: Church at Rome
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Paul wrote Romans to reveal God’s sovereign plan of salvation, to show how Jews and Gentiles fit into that plan, and to exhort them to live righteous and harmonious lives.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: Righteousness of God
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Sin 1-2
2. Salvation 4-5
3. Sanctification 6-8
4. Security 8
5. Selection 9-11
6. Separation 12
7. Service 13-16
VII. Characteristics of Book
A. Romans is the most systematic of Paul’s writings.
B. In Romans, Paul places emphasis on Christian doctrine, e.g. teaching.
C. Paul shares his deep concern for Israel. (9-11).
D. The book of Romans also shows the Romans Road.
Quiz!
Name___________
Matthew
I. Authorship: ____________(gift of God)
II. Date and place of writing: Palestine - 55-70 AD
III. Recipients: _______
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Matthew recorded selected events from the life and ministry of Jesus Christ in order to confirm to a _______ audience that Jesus was indeed the __________ and to explain the Kingdom program of God for the present in light of Israel’s rejection of her King.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: _______________
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The P___________ of the King 1-4
2. The P____________ of the King 5-11
3. The P__________ rejection of the King 12-25
4. The P______ and P____ of the King 26-28
Mark
I. Authorship: ____ (Surname) John
II. Date and Place of writing: 50-68 AD
III. Recipients: _________
IV. Subject/ Purpose Statement
Mark recorded selected events from the life and ministry of Jesus Christ to present the Gospel to a ______
Mark cont.…
audience by proving that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and to provide a pattern of discipleship through the
model of the s_______ s ______ who remains faithful even unto death.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: ________________
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. Jesus Christ is s______ to the m_________ 1-7
2. Jesus Christ is s______ to the d__________ 8-10
3. Jesus Christ is s_________ for the w____ 11-16
Luke
I. Authorship:
II. Date and place of writing: 60 AD
III. Recipients: The Greeks, especially T________
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
Luke provided an _______ account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ for gentile readership in order to certify that Jesus was the promised Messiah for Israel and was indeed the Son of God, who became the Son of Man in order to provide the way for the G_______ to enter the Kingdom as well as _______.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: ________________
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture):
1. The Son of man ________the lost. 1-19
2. The Son of man ________the lost. 20-24
John
I. Authorship: _____(the Apostle) “The Beloved”
II. Date and place of writing: 85-90 AD Asia Minor
III. Recipients: _______________
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement:
John recorded a selected number of signs and saying of Jesus in order to persuade His audience that Jesus was the M______, the ___of ___, who could give them eternal life if they would only ________in Him.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: ______________
VI. book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The p_____ ministry of the Son of God 1-12
2. The p______ ministry of the Son of God 13-17
3. The p ______ ministry of the Son of God 18-20
4. The p___-___ ministry of the Son of God 21
Acts
I. Authorship: ____
II. Date and place of writing: 60 AD / Ceseria and Rome
III. Recipients: Theophilus
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Luke provided an a_______ a______ of the spread of the ________ and the establishment of the _________ to persuade his audience that selected promises of the resurrected _______ were fulfilled and to provide sound defense for the church, its messages and its messengers.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: _______________
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. The witness to J________ 1-7
2. The witness to J_____ and S______ 8-12
3. The witness to the ­­­_____ of the ______13-28
Romans
I. Authorship: _____
II. Date and place of writing: 57 AD Paul’s 3rd Journey
III. Recipients: Church at ______
IV. Subject/Purpose Statement
Paul wrote R_____ to reveal God’s s________ plan of s________, to show how J___ and G_______ fit into that plan, and to exhort them to live r________ and harmonious lives.
V. Book Summary in Three Words: _______________
VI. Book Outline (Big Picture)
1. S__1-2
2. S________ 4-5
3. S_____________ 6-8
4. S_______ 8
5. S________ 9-11
6. S__________12
7. S_______ 13-16
14 Major Events
1. ________________________________________
2. ________________________________________
3. ________________________________________
4. ________________________________________
5. ________________________________________
6. ________________________________________
7. ________________________________________
8. ________________________________________
9. ________________________________________
10._______________________________________
11._______________________________________
12._______________________________________
13._______________________________________
14._______________________________________
Extra Credit: How much reading did you complete?
100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, or ___________________.