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Daniel 11.6-The Prophecy of the Alliance Between Ptolemy II Philadelphus and Antiochus II Theos

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Daniel: Daniel 11:6-The Prophecy of the Alliance Between Ptolemy II and Antiochus II-Lesson # 323

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Wenstrom Bible Ministries

Pastor-Teacher Bill Wenstrom

Wednesday April 9, 2014

www.wenstrom.org

Daniel: Daniel 11:6-The Prophecy of the Alliance Between Ptolemy II and Antiochus II

Lesson # 323

Please turn in your Bibles to Daniel 11:2.

Daniel 11:2 “Now, at this present time, I must reveal to you the truth. Behold, three future kings will ascend to power for Persia. Then, the fourth will cause greater riches to make him wealthier than each and every one of these in comparison. However, when he amasses power through his wealth, the entire nation will stir up the Greek kingdom. 3 Next, a powerful king will ascend to power so that he will rule with great authority with the result that he will do according to his desire. 4 However, after he ascends to power, his kingdom will be broken up. Then, it will be divided towards the heaven’s four winds but not for the benefit of his posterity and in addition, not according to his sovereign will which he sovereignly exercised. For his kingdom will be uprooted specifically, for the benefit of others, to the separation and exclusion of these. 5 Then, the king ruling the south as well as one of his subordinate commanders will be strong. In fact, he will become stronger than him because he will exercise authority over a dominion greater than his dominion.” (My translation)

Daniel 11:6 “After some years they will form an alliance, and the daughter of the king of the South will come to the king of the North to carry out a peaceful arrangement. But she will not retain her position of power, nor will he remain with his power, but she will be given up, along with those who brought her in and the one who sired her as well as he who supported her in those times.” (NASB95)

This verse presents the next prophetic event which will take place some time after the subordinate commander of the king ruling the south will become stronger than the king ruling the south as a result of exercising authority over a dominion greater than the dominion of the king ruling the south.

“They will form an alliance” refers to the alliance formed by the king ruling the south and the king ruling the north.

“And the daughter of the king of the South will come to the king of the North” is a temporal clause indicating that the marriage of the daughter of the king of the south to the king of the north will take place at the same time as this alliance since this marriage will secure this alliance.

“Will come” is the verb bôʾ (בּוֹא) (bow), which means “to enter into marriage” and refers to the daughter of the king ruling the south “entering into marriage” with the king ruling the north which was consummated in their having sexual relations.

“To carry out a peaceful arrangement” is composed of the verb ʿā·śā(h) (עָשָׂה) (aw-saw´), “carry out” and then we have the noun mê·šā·rîm (מֵישָׁרִים) (may-shawr´), “a peaceful arrangement.”

The verb ʿā·śā(h) means “to secure” referring to the daughter of the king ruling the south entering into marriage with the king ruling the north in order to “secure” a peaceful agreement between these two kings.

The infinitive construct form of this verb ʿā·śā(h) is an infinitive construct of purpose indicating the purpose for the marriage of the king ruling the north and the daughter of the king ruling the south indicating that this marriage was “for the purpose of” securing a peaceful agreement between these two rulers.

The noun mê·šā·rîm means “a peace treaty, a peaceful arrangement, a peaceful agreement” referring to an alliance or an agreement between two kings and their kingdoms as the establishment of a relationship.

“But she will not retain her position of power” presents a contrast to the previous statement indicating a contrast between the king ruling the south being an equal with the king ruling the north before the agreement and not remaining his equal after this treaty.

This adversative clause expresses the fact that the daughter of the king ruling the south will by no means retain” her position of power as queen.

“Nor will he remain with his power” prophesies that the king ruling the south will by no means endure or last.

“But she will be given up” presents the reason for the previous adversative clause that the daughter of the king ruling the south will by no means retain her powerful position as queen likewise her father’s power will by no means endure.

This indicates that the daughter of the king ruling the south will by no means retain her powerful position as queen likewise her father’s power will by no means endure “because” she along with her child, her father and husband will be delivered over to death.

“Along with those who brought her in” indicates that the husband of the daughter of the king ruling the south, namely the king ruling the north will be delivered over to death as well.

“Who brought her in” is composed of the verb bôʾ (בּוֹא) (bow), “those who brought in” and this is followed by the third person feminine singular pronominal suffix hî(ʾ) (הִיא) (hee), “her.”

The third person feminine singular pronominal suffix hî(ʾ) means “her” referring to the daughter of the king ruling the south.

The verb bôʾ means “to enter into marriage” and refers to the daughter of the king ruling the south “entering into marriage” with the king ruling the north which was consummated in their having sexual relations.

The masculine plural form does not refer to two individuals such as the king ruling the south and the king ruling the north.

Rather it is a plural of respect or honorific plural meaning although the word is in the plural it is referring to a single honorable person.

Here it refers to the king ruling the north.

“The one who sired her” is composed of the verb yā·lǎḏ (יָלַד) (yaw-lad´), “the one who sired” which is followed by the third person feminine singular pronominal suffix hî(ʾ) (הִיא) (hee), “her.”

The verb yā·lǎḏ means “one born to” referring to an offspring of a husband and wife and here it refers to the child who was the offspring of the daughter of the king ruling the south and the king ruling the north.

The substantive participle form of the verb yā·lǎḏ is modified by the third person feminine singular pronominal suffix hî(ʾ) means “her” referring to the daughter of the king ruling the south.

“As well as he who supported her in those times” refers here to the king ruling the south being the benefactor of his daughter while she was married to the king ruling the north.

Daniel 11:6 “Next, at the end of an unspecified number of years, they will form an alliance as the daughter of the king ruling the south will enter into marriage with the king ruling the north in order to secure a peaceful arrangement. However, she will by no means retain her powerful position likewise he will by no means endure, namely his power. For she will be delivered over as well as he who caused her to enter into marriage, as well as her child and in addition, her benefactor during those times.” (My translation)

History records that all the events prophesied by the angel here in Daniel 11:6 have all taken place.

As we noted in our study of Daniel 11:5, the king ruling the south was Ptolemy I Soter and his subordinate commander was Seleucus I Nicator who became more powerful than the former.

Now, here in Daniel 11:6 the king ruling the south is the son of Ptolemy I Soter, who was named Ptolemy II Philadelphus (285-246 B.C.).

The king ruling the north is Antiochus II Theos (262-246 B.C.) who was the son of Seleucus I Nicator.

History records that these two rulers were bitter rivals.

However, in fulfillment of this prophecy they formed an alliance, which was secured by the marriage of the daughter of Ptolemy II Philadelphus and Antiochus II Theos.

History records this daughter was Bernice and also records that her marriage to Antiochus II Theos did not last.

When Antiochus II Theos married Bernice, he divorced his wife Laodice.

However, when Bernice’s father, Ptolemy II Philadelphus died in 246 B.C., Antiochus II Theos took back his first wife Laodice who exacted revenge on Bernice by killing her and the child she bore to Antiochus II Theos who was also killed by Laodice by poisoning him.

She ruled in his place for brief time but the son of Laodice and Antiochus succeeded Laodice who established him on the throne of his father and his name was Seleucus II Callinicus (246-227).

Therefore, we can see that death of Ptolemy II Philadelphus precipitated the murders of his daughter Bernice, her son and her husband Antiochus II Theos.

There was peace between these two kingdoms during the reigns of Ptolemy I Soter and Seleucus I Nicator.

The former abdicated in favor of his son Ptolemy II Philadelphus whose half brother Magas had married a daughter of Antiochus I Soter who had succeeded Seleucus I Nicator as king over Syria.

This marriage resulted in a war between these two dynasties since Magas persuaded his father-in-law Antiochus I Soter to declare war against Egypt.

Antiochus I Soter was succeeded by Antiochus II Theos who continued the war.

However, as prophesied by the angel here in Daniel 11:6, Ptolemy II Philadelphus offered his daughter, Bernice to Antiochus II Theos, as bribe for peace.

There was a condition attached to this marriage, namely Antiochus II Theos would have to divorce Laodice and would have to declare her two sons as not legitimate heirs to the throne.

However, as also predicted by the angel, when Ptolemy II Philadelphus died, Bernice could no longer retain her position of power as queen since Laodice from her place of exile formed a successful conspiracy.

She engineered a successful coup by having Bernice and the child she bore to Antiochus II Theos killed.

Not long after the death of these two, she poisoned Antiochus II Theos.

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