Faithlife Sermons

Daniel 2.32-The Head Of The Statue Was Of Fine Gold, Its Chest And Arms Of Silver And Its Belly And Thighs Were Of Bronze

Daniel Chapter Two, Verses 30-49  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  Presented   •  1:08:51
0 ratings
· 29 views

Daniel: Daniel 2:32-The Head Of The Statue Was Of Fine Gold, Its Chest And Arms Of Silver, And Its Belly And Thighs Were Of Bronze-Lesson # 56

Files
Notes
Transcript

Wenstrom Bible Ministries

Pastor-Teacher Bill Wenstrom

Tuesday April 3, 2012

www.wenstrom.org

Daniel: Daniel 2:32-The Head Of The Statue Was Of Fine Gold, Its Chest And Arms Of Silver, And Its Belly And Thighs Were Of Bronze

Lesson # 56

Please turn in your Bibles to Daniel 2:31.

Daniel’s description of the content of Nebuchadnezzar’s dream appears in Daniel 2:31-35.

This pericope provides the content of the dream, which consisted of two objects, an image of a man and a stone cut without hands out of the side of a mountain indicating that it was not human in origin.

In verse 31, Daniel tells the king that he was in a trance like state staring at a single immense statue, one of impressive size, extraordinarily bright facing toward him and directly in front of him and was intimidating to the king.

The statue is composed of five different substances: (1) gold (2) silver (3) bronze (4) iron (5) clay.

The head is the most valuable substance followed by the chest and arms, then stomach and thighs which is followed by the lower legs and then lastly the feet and toes.

So the substances which compose each part of the body were telling Nebuchadnezzar something as well as Daniel and the reader, namely, the substances descend in value as you go from the head to the feet.

The diminishing value of the metals in the statue from gold to silver to bronze to iron represents a decrease in the character of authority and rulership.

Consequently, the substances from head to foot go from being soft to harder and then very soft.

This is significant since it indicates that the character of authority and rulership of the first kingdom was superior to the second, third and fourth kingdoms, the second superior to the third and fourth kingdoms, the third superior to the fourth.

The first was the only self-contained unit, the second and third contained one unit and two parts and the fourth contained two parts and ten segments.

However, although the value of the metals decreases in value, the strength of these metals increases, which indicates that Rome was more powerful than Alexander’s Greece, Media-Persia and Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylon.

Alexander’s Greece was more powerful than Media-Persia and Babylon and Media-Persia was more powerful than Babylon.

Daniel 2:32 “The head of that statue was made of fine gold, its breast and its arms of silver, its belly and its thighs of bronze, 33 its legs of iron, its feet partly of iron and partly of clay.” (NASB95)

“The head of that statue was made of fine gold” is composed of the third person masculine singular pronomial suffix hû(ʾ) (הוּא) (who), “that,” which is followed by the masculine singular form of the noun ṣelēm (צְלֵם) (tseh´-lem), “statue” and then we have the masculine singular construct form of the noun rē(ʾ)š (רֵאשׁ) (raysh), “the head of” which is followed by the third person masculine singular pronomial suffix hû(ʾ) (הוּא) (who), which this time is not translated and followed by the particle dî (דִּי) (dee), “of” and then we have the masculine singular noun dehǎḇ (דְּהַב) (deh-hab´), “gold” which is modified by the masculine singular form of the adjective ṭāḇ (טָב) (tawb), “fine.”

As was the case in verse 31, the noun ṣelēm here in verse 32 means “statue” and not “idol” and was in human form as indicated by Daniel’s description of it in verses 31-33.

The noun rē(ʾ)š means “head” referring to the head of the statue, i.e. that part of the physical body containing the brain stem and other essential sensory input parts such as the eyes, mouth, nose and ears.

This indicates that the statue had a human form.

In Daniel 2:36-38, Daniel tells Nebuchadnezzar that his Babylonian kingdom is represented by the statue’s head of gold.

The noun dehǎḇ means “gold” which is a precious metal and appears often in the Word of God (385 times).

Gold is the most valuable of all metals and in the ancient world was indicative of wealth and prosperity in biblical times.

It had a wide variety of uses and was employed extensively in both the tabernacle and the temple.

Gold was of great value (cf. Isaiah 60:17; See also Joshua 6:18-19,24; 1 Kings 20:1-6; 2 Kings 7:8; 14:14; 2 Chronicles 21:3; Job 28:12-19).

Gold was indicative of wealth (Genesis 13:2; 24:35; Deuteronomy 8:12-14; 17:17; Joshua 22:8; 2 Kings 20:13; Isaiah 39:2; 2 Chronicles 1:15; 32:27; Job 3:15; 31:24-28; Ecclesiastes 2:8; Isaiah 2:7; Ezekiel 16:13; Ezekiel 28:4; Zephaniah 1:18; Zechariah 9:3; 14:14; James 2:2; Revelation 18:16).

Gold was relatively rare (Isaiah 13:12) and was mined from the earth (Job 28:5-6; cf. Genesis 2:11-12) and was refined by fire (Revelation 3:18; cf. Numberds 31:21-23; Job 28:1; Proverbs 17:3; 27:21; Zechariah 13:9; Malachi 3:3; 1 Peter 1:7).

In Daniel 2:32, the noun dehǎḇ means “gold” and is modified by the adjective ṭāḇ, which means “pure” indicating that the gold which the head of the statue was composed of was unalloyed or unmixed.

These two words along with the noun rē(ʾ)š, “head” are used to describe Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylonian Empire.

The gold head of this statue represents Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylon according to Daniel 2:36-38.

Since the metals of the statue decrease in value but increase in strength, the gold head of the statue indicates that the character of the authority and rule of this empire was superior to the second, third and fourth kingdoms.

However, its power or strength was inferior to Media-Persia, Alexander’s Greece and Rome.

“Its breast and its arms of silver” is composed of the masculine plural construct form of the noun ḥǎḏē(h) (חֲדֵה) (khad-ee´), “breast” which is modified by the third person masculine singular pronomial suffix hû(ʾ) (הוּא) (who), “its” and then we have the conjunction wa (וְ) (waw), “and” which is followed by the masculine plural construct form of the noun derāʿ (דְּרָע) (der-aw´), “arms” and then we have the third person masculine singular pronomial suffix hû(ʾ) (הוּא) (who), “its” which is followed by the particle dî (דִּי) (dee), “of” which is followed by the masculine plural construct form of the noun kesǎp̄ (כְּסַף) (kes-af´), “silver.”

The noun ḥǎḏē(h) means “chest” referring to the chest of the statue, i.e. that part of the physical body containing the heart and lungs.

This is further indication that the statue had a human form.

This part of the body of the statue represents the second kingdom which will follow Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylon, which history records was the Medo-Persian Empire.

The noun derāʿ means “arms” referring to the arms of the statue.

This too is further indication that the statue had a human form.

Along with the chest, this part of the body of the statue represents the second kingdom which will follow Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylon, which history records was the Medo-Persian Empire.

The noun kesǎp̄ means “silver,” which like gold, is another precious metal capable of being hammered or drawn out thin, and was known to the people of the Bible as early as 3000 B.C.

Silver has a brilliant white color and is remarkably resistant to oxidation.

Silver is often surpassed in value only by gold and had a variety of uses and by New Testament times was common in coinage.

It was mined (Job 28:1-4) and acquired through trade (1 Kings 10:22; 2 Chronicles 9:20; cf. Jeremiah 10:9; Ezekiel 27:12; Revelation 18:11-12).

Silver was refined (Psalm 66:10; Proverbs 17:3; 27:21; Isaiah 48:10; Ezekiel 22:20-22; Zechariah 13:9; Malachi 3:3) and worked by silversmiths (Proverbs 25:4; 2 Chronicles 2:7, 13-14; Acts 19:24).

Possession of silver was a sign of wealth (Genesis 13:2; 24:35; Numbers 22:18; Deuteronomy 8:13; 17:17; Joshua 22:8; 2 Chronicles 32:27; Job 3:13-15; 27:16; Psalm 105:37; Ecclesiastes 2:8; Isaiah 2:7; 60:17; Ezekiel 16:13; Ezekiel 28:4; Daniel 11:43; Hosea 2:8; Zechariah 9:3; 14:14).

In Daniel 2:32, the noun kesǎp̄ means “silver,” and is used to describe Media-Persian Empire, which conquered the Babylonian Empire.

Since the metals of the statue decrease in value but increase in strength, the breast and arms of silver of the statue indicate that the character of authority and rule of this empire was superior to the third and fourth kingdoms but inferior to the first.

However, its power or strength was superior to Babylon but inferior to Alexander’s Greece and Rome.

“Its belly and its thighs of bronze” is composed of the masculine plural construct form of the noun meʿē(h) (מְעֵה) (meh-aw´), “belly” which is modified by the third person masculine singular pronomial suffix hû(ʾ) (הוּא) (who), “its” and then we have the conjunction wa (וְ) (waw), “and” which is followed by the feminine plural construct form of the noun yǎr∙ḵā(h) (יַרְכָה) (yar-kaw´), “thighs” which is modified by the third person masculine singular pronomial suffix hû(ʾ) (הוּא) (who), “its” and then we have the particle dî (דִּי) (dee), “of” which is followed by the masculine singular form of the noun neḥāš (נְחָשׁ) (nekh-awsh´), “bronze.”

The noun meʿē(h) means “belly,” the frontal outer area of the human body approximately from bottom of the ribs to sexual organs.

This word is also further indication that the statue had a human form.

This part of the body represents the third kingdom which will follow Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylon, which history records was Alexander the Great’s Greece.

The noun yǎr∙ḵā(h) is in the plural and means “thighs” referring to the upper leg area, which contains the femur and hamstrings.

It is the proximal segment of the vertebrate hind or lower limb extending from the hip to the knee.

This word is another indication that the statue had a human form.

Along with the belly, the thighs of the statue represent the third kingdom which will follow Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylon and the Medo-Persian Empire, which history records was Alexander the Great’s Greece.

The noun neḥāš means “bronze” which is an alloy of copper and tin.

Bronze was highly prized for its strength and durability.

It had a variety of uses in biblical times and was employed extensively in both the tabernacle and temple.

Bronze as a material was used by craftsmen (Genesis 4:22; Exodus 31:1-6; 35:30-34; 1 Kings 7:13-14; 1 Chronicles 22:15-16; 2 Chronicles 2:7, 13-14; 24:12).

It was renowned for its strength (Jeremiah 15:12; Leviticus 26:18-19; Deuteronomy 28:23; Job 6:12; 37:18; 40:18; 41:27; Isaiah 48:4; Jeremiah 1:18; 15:20; Daniel 7:19; Micah 4:13) as well as for its brilliance (Daniel 10:5-6l; Ezekiel 40:3; Revelation 1:15; 2:18).

Bronze was an expensive metal (Revelation 18:11-12; 1 Chronicles 18:8-10; Ezra 8:26-27; Ezekiel 27:13) but was less valuable than gold or silver (Isaiah 60:17; 1 Kings 14:25-28; 2 Chronicles 12:9-11).

In Daniel 2:32, the noun neḥāš means “bronze,” and is used to describe Alexander the Great’s Greek Empire, which immediately followed the Media-Persian Empire.

Since the metals of the statue decrease in value but increase in strength, the belly and thighs of bronze of the statue indicate that the character of authority and rule of this empire was superior to the fourth kingdom but inferior to the first two.

However, its power or strength was superior to Babylon and Media-Persia and inferior only to Rome.

Related Media
Related Sermons