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Exodus 29.1-9-The Overview Of The Consecration Of The Priests

Exodus Chapters 19-32  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  Presented   •  1:21:55
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Journey Through The Bible Series: Exodus 29:1-9-The Overview Of The Consecration Of The Priests-Lesson # 37

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Wenstrom Bible Ministries

Pastor-Teacher Bill Wenstrom

Sunday May 27, 2012

www.wenstrom.org

Journey Through The Bible Series: Exodus 29:1-9-The Overview Of The Consecration Of The Priests

Lesson # 37

Please turn in your Bibles to Exodus 29:1.

This morning we will begin a study of Exodus chapter 29, which addresses the ordination or consecration of Aaron and his sons as priests to serve in the tabernacle.

This chapter is divided into five sections: (1) Overview of the chapter (2) The sacrifices connected to the consecrationordination of the priests (10-35). (a) The use of the bull as a sin offering (verses 10-14). (b) The first ram as a whole burnt offering (verses 15-18). (c) The use of the blood of the second consecrationordination ram (verses 19-21). (d) Offering the rest of the second consecrationordination ram (verses 22-26). (e) Establishing the offering portions and garments were permanent features of Israel’s sacrificial system (verses 27-30). (f) Cooking and eating consecrationordination ram (verses 31-34). (g) Summary of the consecrationordination of the priests (verse 35). (3) Consecrating the altar (verses 36-37). (4) Permanent consecrationordination burnt offering for the tabernacle (verses 38-42a). (5) Reminder and promise of the presence of God among His people (verses 42b-46).

Exodus 29 and Leviticus 8-9 both address the consecration or ordination of Aaron and his sons as priests and complement each other.

The latter narrates the actual performance of the ordination/consecration ceremony whereas the former provides the instructions to be carried out in this ceremony.

This week we will note the first major section of the chapter which contains the overview for the chapter.

Next week we will note the second and third major sections which appear in verses 10-37, which address the offerings connected to the consecration of the priests and the altar.

Then lastly, in two weeks we will note the final two sections which appear in verses 38-46 that contain instructions regarding the permanent consecration burnt offering for the tabernacle and the reminder and promise of the presence of God among His people.

The ordinationconsecration ceremony which is described in verses 1-37 contains eight steps: (1) Washing Aaron and his sons (verse 4) (2) Clothing Aaron and his sons (verses 5-6, 8-9) (3) Anointing Aaron and his sons (verse 7). (4) The use of the bull as a sin offering (verses 10-14). (5) The first ram as a whole burnt offering (verses 15-18). (6) The use of the blood of the second consecrationordination ram (verses 19-21). (7) Offering the rest of the second consecrationordination ram (verses 22-26). (8) Cooking and eating consecrationordination ram (verses 31-34).

Exodus 29:1 “Now this is what you shall do to them to consecrate them to minister as priests to Me: take one young bull and two rams without blemish, 2 and unleavened bread and unleavened cakes mixed with oil, and unleavened wafers spread with oil; you shall make them of fine wheat flour. 3 You shall put them in one basket, and present them in the basket along with the bull and the two rams. 4 Then you shall bring Aaron and his sons to the doorway of the tent of meeting and wash them with water. 5 You shall take the garments, and put on Aaron the tunic and the robe of the ephod and the ephod and the breastpiece, and gird him with the skillfully woven band of the ephod; 6 and you shall set the turban on his head and put the holy crown on the turban. 7 Then you shall take the anointing oil and pour it on his head and anoint him. 8 You shall bring his sons and put tunics on them. 9 You shall gird them with sashes, Aaron and his sons, and bind caps on them, and they shall have the priesthood by a perpetual statute. So you shall ordain Aaron and his sons.” (NASB95)

“Them” refers to Aaron and his sons since in the previous chapter the Lord gave Moses instructions regarding the clothing to be worn by Aaron and his sons while serving in the tabernacle.

“Consecrate” is the verb qā∙ḏǎš (קָדַשׁ) (kaw-dash´), which refers to setting apart Aaron’s sons to serve the Lord in the tabernacle as priests.

“To minister as priests” is the composed of the preposition l- (לְ־) (leh), “to” and the verb kā∙hǎn (כָּהַן) (kaw-han´), which means “to officiate as a priest, to serve as a priest.”

There have been seven different orders of priests serving God in history: (1) Jesus Christ’s Great High Priesthood (Hebrews 2:17; 3:1; 4:14-15; 5:1, 5-6, 10; 6:20; 7:14) (2) Universal royal priesthood of church age believers (1 Peter 2:5, 9; Rev. 1:6; 5:10; 20:6). (3) Priesthood of Melchizedek (Genesis 14:18; Psalm 110:4; Hebrews 7:1, 17; 23, 26-28; 8:1; 9:11; 10:21). (4) High Priesthood of Aaron (Exodus 29; Leviticus 8-9) (5) Priesthood of Aaron sons (Exodus 29; Leviticus 8-9). (6) Levitical priesthood (Numbers 1:47-54; 8:5-22). (7) Priesthood of Israel (Exodus 19:6; Isaiah 61:6).

The priesthood of Aaron, his sons and the Levites meant that they were set apart to serve the Lord and Israel exclusively in the tabernacle worship (Leviticus 22:9; cf. Exodus 28:1, 4, 41; 29:1, 44; 30:34; 31:10; 35:19; 39:41).

They were not to incur uncleanness (Leviticus 21:1)

Some exceptions to uncleanness by touching a corpse are listed in verses 2-3 (cf. Ezekiel 44:25).

They were not to shave or mutilate themselves (Leviticus 21:5; cf. Ezekiel 44:20) nor marry any but a virtuous Israelite (Leviticus 21:7; cf. Ezekiel 44:22).

They were not to drink wine before entering the sanctuary (Leviticus 10:9; cf. Ezekiel 44:21) and were disqualified by physical defects (Leviticus 21:17; cf. 21:18-22).

They were not to allow outsiders to eat the sacred offerings (Leviticus 22:15-16; cf. 24:9; 1 Samuel 21:4; Matthew 12:4) and were not to own land in Israel (Numbers 18:20; cf. Ezekiel 44:28).

They were not to offer unacceptable sacrifices (Leviticus 22:20; cf. Malachi 1:7-9) and were to obey God’s law meticulously (Leviticus 22:31; cf. Ezekiel 44:24).

The priests supervised the sanctuary and were the only ones in Israel who had access to holy things (Numbers 3:10; cf. 4:5; Ezekiel 40:45-46; 44:16; Joel 2:17) and tended the sanctuary lamps (Exodus 27:21).

They carried the ark (Deuteronomy 31:9; cf. Joshua 3:8, 15, 17; 4:9, 16; 6:12) and supervised the sacrifices (Leviticus 1:5; cf. 1:8; 2:2; 1 Chronicles 9:30).

The priests led the nation as role models (Malachi 2:6), as teachers (Ezekiel 44:23; cf. Leviticus 10:10; Deuteronomy 31:10-13; Ezra 7:6; Malachi 2:7), as judges Deuteronomy (17:9; cf. 19:17; 21:5; 2 Chronicles 19:8; Ezekiel 44:24) and as encouragers in battle (Numbers10:8; cf. Joshua 6:4; 2 Chronicles 13:12).

In Exodus 29:1-2, the Lord lists the items needed for the process of ordaining or consecrating the priests and then describes this process as it would unfold.

These priests would serve the Lord who would not only serve the host, Yahweh but also His guests, which would be the Israelites.

The items listed in these verses were one young bull and two rams without blemish (verse 1) as well as unleavened bread and unleavened cakes mixed with oil and in addition, unleavened wafers spread with oil, which shall be made with wheat flour.

Verse 3 says that all of these are to be put in a basket and represented the ingredients for a special meal and indicated the formality of the meal.

In verse 4, we are told that Aaron and his sons were to be washed before the sacrifice, which represented obedience to the Lord’s command as a result of understanding the Lord’s demand that the priest be holy and pure and healthy.

Being washed before putting on the priestly garments demonstrated respect for the priestly garments and thus respect for the office.

This washing is referred to in Leviticus 8:6 and was a complete washing of the body and not just the hands and feet.

In verse 5, after washing, Aaron could put on the priestly garments.

All the items which Aaron was to wear that are mentioned in verses 5-6 were discussed in chapter 28.

In Exodus 29:7, the Lord instructs Moses to anoint Aaron after clothing him with his priestly garments, which would set apart him to serve the Lord and the Israelites in the tabernacle.

The command to anoint Aaron and his sons is mentioned again in Exodus 30:30 and 40:15.

The anointing of Aaron is recorded in Leviticus 8:12.

“Anoint” is the verb mā∙šǎḥ (מָשַׁח) (maw-shakh´), which refers to smearing Aaron with oil representing that he was set apart to serve exclusively both the Lord and the Israelites as a priest in the tabernacle.

The NET Bible has the following comment, they write “Oil of anointing was used for all major offices (giving the label with the passive adjective “mashiah” (or “messiah”) to anyone anointed. In the further revelation of Scripture, the oil came to signify the enablement as well as the setting apart, and often the Holy Spirit came on the person at the anointing with oil. The olive oil was a symbol of the Spirit in the OT as well (Zech 4:4–6). And in the NT ‘anointing’ signifies empowerment by the Holy Spirit for service.”

Exodus 29:8-9 indicates that after Aaron as the high priest was consecrated or ordained, the other priests, Aaron sons were to follow in being clothed and ordained or consecrated to serve in the tabernacle.

Their clothing is mentioned in Exodus 28:40-43, which represented the dignity and honor of the office of priest in the sense that these articles would provide them with high status in the Israelite community so that they are respected.

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