Faithlife Sermons

Job 28 Wisdom Gained

Job & Ecclesiastes  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 5 views
Notes
Transcript
What is your favorite play?
What do you like about plays, vs. other story telling art forms?
The book of Job is not a play, but it does share some things in common with plays:
Defined speakers - Job, Eliphaz, Bildad, Zophar, Elihu
Defined Speeches
Job
Eliphaz/Job, Bildad/Job, Zophar/job
Eliphaz/Job, Bildad/Job, Zophar/job
Eliphaz/Job, Bildad/Job
Job - discourse on God’s wisdom
Job - defense of his innocence
God/Job, God/Job
Prologue, Epilogue, “chorus” ?
One aspect of some plays (Greek, some Shakespeare) is the “chorus”
The purpose of the Greek chorus was to provide background and summary information to the audience to help them understand what was going on in the performance. They commented on themes, expressed what the main characters couldn’t say (like secrets, thoughts, and fears) and provided other characters with information and insights.
https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/exploring-greek-chorus/
Shakespeare, narrator - “Chorus”, Henry V
There are few other plays written by Shakespeare that include a chorus, however in no other play does the chorus have such an important role. The principal purpose of the chorus is that of story telling. The chorus acts as a guide for the audience, narrating parts that wouldn't fit into the action of the play. For example in the Act II Chorus, we are told about treason: 'The sum is paid, the traitors are agreed, the king is now set from London, and the scene is now transported, gentles, to Southampton.'
http://www.markedbyteachers.com/as-and-a-level/english/what-are-the-functions-of-the-chorus-in-shakespeare-s-henry-v.html
Tom Constable’s Expository Notes on the Bible 1. Job’s discourse on God’s wisdom ch. 28

Because the speech in this chapter is more soliloquy than dialogue some scholars have concluded that someone other than Job spoke it

Job—The Wisdom of the Cross Who Speaks in Chapter 28?

Who is speaking in chapter 28? This is a very different chapter from all that has gone before and all that follows. It is a unique chapter in the book. It has no smooth literary connection with the immediate contexts before or after; it is not explicitly addressed to any of the participants; it contains no accusations, no complaints, and no responses to anything said previously. And it has a reflective tone, which contrasts with the passionate arguments on either side. Here is a tranquil, contemplative pause for thought. If Job were read aloud, this chapter would be read in a quieter tone of voice. In a Greek tragedy it might be read by a chorus standing at the back of the stage.2

For this reason most scholars assume that this chapter is an interlude inserted by the writer/compiler of the book.

From our previous discussion - who wrote Job? Maybe someone like Solomon?
The wisest man who ever lived
who had tremendous knowledge of nature, engineering, building
From that perspective then, this isn’t just any chapter in Job. These aren’t the fallible thoughts of Job’s three friends, or even the sometimes accurate/sometimes not thoughts of Job. These are the thoughts of God.
We can’t read just a selection from this chapter!

A HYMN TO WISDOM

28 Surely there is a mine for silver

and a place where gold is refined.

2 Iron is taken from the ground,

and copper is smelted from ore.

3 A miner puts an end to the darkness;

he probes the deepest recesses

for ore in the gloomy darkness.

4 He cuts a shaft far from human habitation,

in places unknown to those who walk above ground.

Suspended far away from people,

the miners swing back and forth.

5 Food may come from the earth,

but below the surface the earth is transformed as by fire.

6 Its rocks are a source of lapis lazuli,

containing flecks of gold.

7 No bird of prey knows that path;

no falcon’s eye has seen it.

8 Proud beasts have never walked on it;

no lion has ever prowled over it.

9 The miner uses a flint tool

and turns up ore from the root of the mountains.

10 He cuts out channels in the rocks,

and his eyes spot every treasure.

11 He dams up the streams from flowing

so that he may bring to light what is hidden.

12 But where can wisdom be found,

and where is understanding located?

13 No one can know its value,

since it cannot be found in the land of the living.

14 The ocean depths say, “It’s not in me,”

while the sea declares, “I don’t have it.”

15 Gold cannot be exchanged for it,

and silver cannot be weighed out for its price.

16 Wisdom cannot be valued in the gold of Ophir,

in precious onyx or lapis lazuli.

17 Gold and glass do not compare with it,

and articles of fine gold cannot be exchanged for it.

18 Coral and quartz are not worth mentioning.

The price of wisdom is beyond pearls.

19 Topaz from Cush cannot compare with it,

and it cannot be valued in pure gold.

20 Where then does wisdom come from,

and where is understanding located?

21 It is hidden from the eyes of every living thing

and concealed from the birds of the sky.

22 Abaddon and Death say,

“We have heard news of it with our ears.”

23 But God understands the way to wisdom,

and he knows its location.

24 For he looks to the ends of the earth

and sees everything under the heavens.

25 When God fixed the weight of the wind

and distributed the water by measure,

26 when he established a limit for the rain

and a path for the lightning,

27 he considered wisdom and evaluated it;

he established it and examined it.

28 He said to mankind,

“The fear of the Lord—that is wisdom.

And to turn from evil is understanding.”

lapis lazuli = sapphire

1. Valued

Job 28:12–19 CSB
12 But where can wisdom be found, and where is understanding located? 13 No one can know its value, since it cannot be found in the land of the living. 14 The ocean depths say, “It’s not in me,” while the sea declares, “I don’t have it.” 15 Gold cannot be exchanged for it, and silver cannot be weighed out for its price. 16 Wisdom cannot be valued in the gold of Ophir, in precious onyx or lapis lazuli. 17 Gold and glass do not compare with it, and articles of fine gold cannot be exchanged for it. 18 Coral and quartz are not worth mentioning. The price of wisdom is beyond pearls. 19 Topaz from Cush cannot compare with it, and it cannot be valued in pure gold.
v. 12 What is wisdom (hakmeh)? - mastery
What is understanding (biynah)? - insight
Biblical wisdom - understanding how life works so that you make masterful decisions (Tim Keller).
Some life situations require facts (this medicine or that medicine; what is required to fix a noise coming from my car; how do I repair a door on my house)
Some life situations require moral judgments - what is the right or wrong thing to do in this situation
Some life situations a require much more than facts and moral judgments:
When is the right time to retire?
What is the right career to pursue? Should I change careers?
Should I move to be closer to family?
How should I deal with personal conflicts with family?
Do you see then why wisdom is so valuable? If you take the wrong path for some of these decisions you can wreck your life!
Life is complex. Sometimes the decision that works for someone doesn’t work for someone else. What to do?

2. Hidden

Job 28:20–22 CSB
20 Where then does wisdom come from, and where is understanding located? 21 It is hidden from the eyes of every living thing and concealed from the birds of the sky. 22 Abaddon and Death say, “We have heard news of it with our ears.”
Wisdom is inaccessible by human abilities. Even to birds, who have the highest vantage point cannot find wisdom.
Abaddon - the underworld, where no living man can go
Can you relate to this? Have you ever wrestled over a decision, knowing that wisdom was needed, and not known what to do?

3. Found

Job 28:23–27 CSB
23 But God understands the way to wisdom, and he knows its location. 24 For he looks to the ends of the earth and sees everything under the heavens. 25 When God fixed the weight of the wind and distributed the water by measure, 26 when he established a limit for the rain and a path for the lightning, 27 he considered wisdom and evaluated it; he established it and examined it.
“Because God has established the order of creation, He alone can reveal wisdom to humanity”
God knows the way things work
God knows the purposes - why things happen the way that they do

4. Offered

Job 28:28 CSB
28 He said to mankind, “The fear of the Lord—that is wisdom. And to turn from evil is understanding.”
This idea is in Job, Psalms, and Proverbs
The fear of the Lord: “awe and wonder and reverence and stillness” - is that our view of God?
How does this relate to Job? What should his attitude be in a trial? What should ours be?
Jesus in the garden - “not my will but thine be done”
To turn from evil
So much trouble in life would be avoided if we would just turn from evil.
Job—The Wisdom of the Cross The Humbling Resolution (vv. 23–28)

What has this wonderful poem achieved? More than anything else it has made us stop and think. We must pause when we read this. Why this curious and seemingly irrelevant poem interrupting the passionate ebb and flow of debate? Answer: we must ponder and consider again the biggest issues of the book. What are the really big questions? And where have we arrived in unraveling them? Not far!

Related Media
Related Sermons