Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

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*Praise to the God of Unlimited Power*
*Ephesians 3:20-21*
 
When I mention the word /doxology/, some of our seasoned saints will probably think of the song we used to sing from time to time called The Doxology– /Praise God from Whom all blessings flow, praise Him ye creatures here below, praise Him above ye heavenly hosts, Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.
Aaaaaaa-mennnnn.
/Do any of you remember that song?
Well, though we don’t sing the song any more, the first two words of that song pretty much define /doxology/ – praise God.
A doxology is a hymn of praise to God.
The term comes from the Greek word for glory – /doxa/.
We’ll have more to say about that later.
The Apostle Paul was fond of doxologies.
We find them at various places throughout his writings.
For example…
 
         /Oh, the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God!  How unsearchable are His judgments and unfathomable His ways! /
/          For  who has known the mind of the Lord, or who became His counselor?
/
/         Or who has first given to Him that it might be paid back to him again?
/
/         For  from Him and through Him and to Him are all things.
 To Him be the glory forever.
Amen.
(Romans 11:33-36)/
/ /
/         Now to our God and Father be the glory forever and ever.
Amen.
(Philippians 4:20)/
/ /
/         Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory forever and ever.
Amen.
(1 Timothy 1:17)./
Those are doxologies.
These in particular are moments in the letters of Paul when he breaks out in loud praise to glorify God.
You will note in these doxologies that there are two common ingredients.
First, there are one or more things about God which trigger the praise.
It may be His unsearchable wisdom or His eternality or His role as Creator; but there is some quality or attribute of God which sets us to singing His praise.
Second, there is the recognition of and desire for God’s glory.
To Him be the glory.
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