Faithlife Sermons

Hebrews 10:19-39

Notes
Transcript
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Lord, here we go again!
Pray. Think myself empty. Read myself full. Write myself clear. Pray myself haught.
Be myself. Forget myself.
Lord, let this message be a beacon for you. Let me be forgotten and invisible. Let them see and know you, only you.
“Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.” Psalm 19:14
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The word Gospel means “good news”. It’s pretty important to understand that. The Bible is not a book that tells us what we have to do to earn salvation, it is a book that tells us what God did to earn our salvation.
What he did was send Jesus. Jesus did for us what we could never do for ourselves and he paid for what we had done in his body on the cross.
God created human beings and intended for them to be ruling creatures. We were supposed to be under God but over everything else. We were supposed to rule over creation under the guidance and authority of God’s Word and to function as conduits for all the blessings of heaven.
That’s how it was supposed to be, but unfortunately, the Bible tells the story of how our first parents, Adam and Eve, fell into sin by choosing to rebel against God’s Word in order to become autonomous ruling creatures. Basically, they wanted to be gods unto themselves, deciding good and evil.
From that point on, humanity has been on a downward spiral moving further and further away from God and our original design and glory.
The heart of the Gospel is the Good News that Jesus has come as God in the flesh and has obeyed God perfectly and has therefore won the right to all the blessings God originally intended to give to men and women. Furthermore, through his sacrificial death on the cross, he has paid the debt that we owed to God for disobeying his commands.
There is therefore no need anymore for us to hide from God. In Jesus, we can come home and we can be restored. The climax of the Gospel is the great news that he rose from the dead and ascended into heaven where he now intercedes on our behalf.
He gives the Holy Spirit to all his people and he slowly but surely, changes our hearts, reforms our desires and teaches us how to be the children of God we were always intended to be.
For now, Jesus remains in heaven, changing the world one person at a time, but one day he will return and judge the world in righteousness. He will remove from this world all sin and all causes of sin and he will restore the cosmos to a state of peace, prosperity and flourishing and all those who have received him as their Lord and Savior will participate in his rule and enjoy his goodness forever.
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PRAY
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Nic
Hebrews 10:19–22 ESV
19 Therefore, brothers, since we have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus, 20 by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain, that is, through his flesh, 21 and since we have a great priest over the house of God, 22 let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water.
Brandi
Hebrews 10:23–25 ESV
23 Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. 24 And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, 25 not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.
Jake
Hebrews 10:26–29 ESV
26 For if we go on sinning deliberately after receiving the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins, 27 but a fearful expectation of judgment, and a fury of fire that will consume the adversaries. 28 Anyone who has set aside the law of Moses dies without mercy on the evidence of two or three witnesses. 29 How much worse punishment, do you think, will be deserved by the one who has trampled underfoot the Son of God, and has profaned the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has outraged the Spirit of grace?
Jami
Hebrews 10:30–33 ESV
30 For we know him who said, “Vengeance is mine; I will repay.” And again, “The Lord will judge his people.” 31 It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God. 32 But recall the former days when, after you were enlightened, you endured a hard struggle with sufferings, 33 sometimes being publicly exposed to reproach and affliction, and sometimes being partners with those so treated.
Brady
Hebrews 10:34–36 ESV
34 For you had compassion on those in prison, and you joyfully accepted the plundering of your property, since you knew that you yourselves had a better possession and an abiding one. 35 Therefore do not throw away your confidence, which has a great reward. 36 For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God you may receive what is promised.
Justin
Hebrews 10:37–39 ESV
37 For, “Yet a little while, and the coming one will come and will not delay; 38 but my righteous one shall live by faith, and if he shrinks back, my soul has no pleasure in him.” 39 But we are not of those who shrink back and are destroyed, but of those who have faith and preserve their souls.
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Justin Prays
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If you recall from last week, I said that we’re going to look at one main idea in chapter 10.
ΜΑΙΝ ΙDEA: Because the sacrifice of Christ is endlessly effective, it produces people with spiritual stamina, liberal love, and conspicuous commitment.
Last week we discussed the permanence of Christ’s sacrifice and how it was a sufficient one time sacrifice instead of the perpetual insufficient sacrifices of the Old Testament priests.
This week, we will be looking at the Power of Christ’s Sacrifice.
Our response to Christ’s death provides power to love others and to demonstrate endurance in the Christian life.
Tonight, in verses 19-25, we’re going to look at the writer’s Appeal to the readers to Experience Christ’s Power
The basis of our confidence as Christians is the fact that we have access to the Most Holy Place because of the death of Jesus and the fact that he reigns as a great priest over the house of God. This should inspire us to draw near to God with the faith that takes the promises of the new covenant seriously, to hold unswervingly to the hope we profess, and to consider how best to spur one another on towards love and good deeds.
Peterson, David G. “Hebrews.” New Bible Commentary: 21st Century Edition. Ed. D. A. Carson et al. 4th ed. Leicester, England; Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 1994. 1344. Print.
We’re going to look at this in two different sections, vv. 19-21 and then vv. 22-25
“19–21 These verses summarize in very simple terms the doctrinal argument of chs. 7–10."
“Therefore”
What is the “therefore” there for? Here, this “therefore” emphasizes that in view of what Christ Jesus has done, believers can approach in confidence. We can experience Christ’s power by drawing near to God, maintaining our faith, and loving others.
We have the personal privilege of direct access to God that is no longer reserved and limited to the priesthood.
“There are two things that we have as Christian brothers and sisters, and on this basis the writer makes his threefold charge in 10:22–25. First we have confidence to enter the Most Holy Place by the blood of Jesus... God gives this confidence to us through the gospel.”
The gospel is the good news that God, the loving Creator, sovereign King, and holy Judge of all, has looked upon men and women wonderfully and uniquely made in His image who have rebelled against Him, are separated from Him, and deserve death before Him, and He has sent His Son, Jesus, God in the flesh, the long-awaited King, to live a perfect and powerful life, to die a sacrificial and substitutionary death, and to rise from the grave in victory over sin, Satan, and death. The gospel is a summons from God for all people in all nations to repent and believe in Jesus for the forgiveness of sins, turning from all idols to declare allegiance to Jesus alone as King and trust in Jesus alone as Lord. All who turn from Jesus will experience everlasting, horrifying suffering in hell, while all who trust in Jesus will experience everlasting, satisfying communion with God in heaven. (Secret Church 2020, David Platt, Radical.net)
“Fundamentally, it is a confidence of free and open access to God (confidence to enter the Most Holy Place), based on the unique sacrifice of Jesus (by the blood of Jesus).”
This confidence describes a boldness believers have because of our new relationship with God. The Most Holy Place was that part of the sanctuary which symbolized the presence of God. The term used in verse 19 is not the term not for the tabernacle but for the presence of God.
Believers can approach God because of the blood of Jesus. Not animal sacrifice but Jesus’ sacrifice of himself has opened the door. All who have found a new relationship to God through Jesus can experience this privilege.
Lea, Thomas D. Hebrews, James. Vol. 10. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1999. Print. Holman New Testament Commentary.
“There is an intimate connection between Christ’s entrance into the heavenly sanctuary and our own (cf. 4:14–16; 6:19–20). He has opened a new and living way into God’s presence for us, through the curtain, that is, his body (lit. ‘his flesh’). The curtain in the earthly tabernacle was the means of access to the Most Holy Place for the high priest. Metaphorically speaking, Jesus’ sacrificial death was the curtain or means of access to the heavenly sanctuary for him and for all who trust in him!”
Recall
Matthew 27:51 ESV
51 And behold, the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. And the earth shook, and the rocks were split.
This veil or curtain was opened and no longer a divider which allowed a boldness found in Christ.
Jesus’ human life and sacrificial death have made the Most Holy Place wide open so believers can enter directly into God’s presence. This was part of Jesus’ high priestly service.
Lea, Thomas D. Hebrews, James. Vol. 10. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1999. Print. Holman New Testament Commentary.
The second thing that we have as Christian brothers and sisters is a great priest over the house of God. It is clear from 3:6 that ‘the house of God’ means the people of God. Our great priest makes it possible for us to draw near to God together and to share the hope of living for ever in his presence (cf. vs 22–23). But this allusion to our common experience as Christians means also that we have responsibilities to one another (cf. vs 24–25).”
Peterson, David G. “Hebrews.” New Bible Commentary: 21st Century Edition. Ed. D. A. Carson et al. 4th ed. Leicester, England; Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 1994. 1344. Print.
In vv. 22-25, the writer gives three charges or exhortation that believers have.
The first is to draw near to God in an expression of personal devotion. To do so, there are four conditions for approaching God.
1. With a sincere heart. Genuine devotion and not hypocrisy.
Whereas the evil heart leads to falling away, the true heart leads to approaching God. The new covenant promise called for the reworking of the heart
Barry, John D. et al. Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012, 2016. Print.
2. With full assurance of faith. “This demands a bold confidence that God has provided full access to his presence through Christ alone.”
Lea, Thomas D. Hebrews, James. Vol. 10. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1999. Print. Holman New Testament Commentary.
3. With clean hearts and not a guilty conscience. This is a constant confession of our sins and openness to God.
Whereas the OT sacrifices could purify only the flesh, Jesus cleanses people’s hearts and consciences
Barry, John D. et al. Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012, 2016. Print.
4. Bodies washed with pure water.
The writer’s words are probably an exhortation to lay hold consciously of the cleansing benefits of Christ’s Cross and to draw near to God in enjoying them, putting away inward guilt and outward impurity. These verses approximate 1 Jn 1:9.
Hodges, Zane C. “Hebrews.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 805. Print.
This may be a reference to baptism as an outward commitment to Christ, or it might be symbolic as is the previous reference to hearts sprinkled with blood. If it is symbolic, the hearts sprinkled from a guilty conscience would picture our salvation, and our bodies washed would symbolize a righteous lifestyle. In this new state of purity made possible by Jesus, believers can come boldly to God and claim his grace and mercy.
Lea, Thomas D. Hebrews, James. Vol. 10. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1999. Print. Holman New Testament Commentary.
10:23—The second exhortation appeals to us to maintain spiritual consistency. Hold Firm to the Hope we profess. When we profess Christ, we are professing this hope. This hope offers glory which beamed more brightly than the glories of the old order. We are to lay hold of Christ and never let go, even in the slightest. No persecution, real or feared, was to lessen the (passion) ardor of these believers for Christ.
Holding fast to the confession means maintaining a consistent confidence in the salvation Jesus brings through His faithful life, death, and resurrection
Barry, John D. et al. Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012, 2016. Print.
The writer revealed in these verses that his concern for fidelity to the faith is not an abstraction, but a confrontation with real danger.
Hodges, Zane C. “Hebrews.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 805. Print.
The question is Is it really possible to live unswervingly? If holding on to the promises depended on personal commitment, we would all be in trouble. God is faithful to provide strength and stamina for endurance. His faithful character is beyond all doubt. In his strength we hold on unswervingly. We will read heroic examples of spiritual steadfastness in chapter 11.
Lea, Thomas D. Hebrews, James. Vol. 10. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1999. Print. Holman New Testament Commentary.
10:24. The third exhortation calls us to responsibility to one another. The appeal to consider demands concentrated attention. The goal of this attention was to spur one another on toward love and good deeds. As Christians we have a corporate responsibility. We must help others who stumble and falter. We must concentrate on the needs of others and not on our individual salvation only.
We can spur people toward either good or bad works. Hebrews calls us to lead others to a practical expression of love and an attractive display of unselfish deeds.
The three important virtues of faith, hope, and love are mentioned in three consecutive verses (see 1 Cor. 13:13). Faith provides assurance. Hope promises an incentive to obedience. Love provides a foundation for prodding believers to godly living.
10:25. To spur other believers forward in the Christian life, followers of Christ must meet together. Some of the readers of Hebrews were neglecting to meet together for worship, and this limited their ability to give and receive encouragement toward good works.
Christians who meet together with the aim of promoting godliness and love for one another can be remarkably successful in their ventures. Regular fellowship with believers is an essential ingredient in Christian growth. The readers of Hebrews knew that the Day of Christ’s return was drawing near. The closeness of this day compelled them to stimulate one another in an outburst of energy and concern.
Persecution may have led some believers to drop out of the fellowship. The remedy they needed was to begin meeting again. The verses following in 26–31 showed the final outcome of neglecting to meet with other believers. Such careless living could produce a contempt for Jesus and a renunciation of Christianity.
Lea, Thomas D. Hebrews, James. Vol. 10. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1999. Print. Holman New Testament Commentary.
This we will get into more next week.
What loyalties or commitments do you have? To who or what? Why are these important?
What are you confident of (i.e. sports, academics, music, etc)? What makes you confident?
If you are a professing believer, what was the point that you believed or what lead to that point?
How do you spur one another on in their faith? How can others help you grow in your faith?
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