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The Triumph of the Crucified King

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Introduction

Palm Sunday Connection

Palm Sunday Connection

Palm Sunday Connection

Today we celebrate Palm Sunday, the day that began Passion Week. The account from the gospel of Luke reads like this, “28 And when he had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. 29 When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples, 30 saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here. 31 If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’ ” 32 So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them. 33 And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?” 34 And they said, “The Lord has need of it.” 35 And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it. 36 And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road. 37 As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, 38 saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!”
Today we celebrate Palm Sunday, the day that began Passion Week. The account from the gospel of Luke reads like this, “28 And when he had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. 29 When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples, 30 saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here. 31 If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’ ” 32 So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them. 33 And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?” 34 And they said, “The Lord has need of it.” 35 And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it. 36 And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road. 37 As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, 38 saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” So what we have here is Jesus riding on a Donkey into Jerusalem. As the disciples said in verse 38, He was riding on this donkey as a victorious King coming in the name of the Lord into His capitol city. This moment that Sunday, has been called the Triumphal Entry. But my question to you today is this: was this entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? He entered Sunday only to be betrayed by one of the 12 disciples who had been with Him since the beginning of His ministry. He was falsely accused and unjustly tried by the religious leaders of Israel, one of His closest disciples denied even knowing Him multiple times. He was beaten, mocked, scourged, and a crown of thorns - mocking His title of King - was hammered into His skull. Just five days after coming into Jerusalem as a king, He was led out of Jerusalem a criminal carrying his cross on his back.From every human vantage point, the triumph of Palm Sunday had transformed into defeat. Surely that was the feeling that the disciples experienced. Five days prior, they received him as King. But Mark’s gospel tells us that they all left Him and fled. So again, my question for you today is this was the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? 
Today we celebrate Palm Sunday, the day that began Passion Week. We just heard Tim read Luke’s account of that event and what we saw there is Jesus riding on a Donkey into Jerusalem. As the disciples said in verse 38, He was riding on this donkey as a victorious King coming in the name of the Lord into His capitol city. This moment has been called the Triumphal Entry.
So what we have here is Jesus riding on a Donkey into Jerusalem. As the disciples said in verse 38, He was riding on this donkey as a victorious King coming in the name of the Lord into His capitol city. This moment that Sunday, has been called the Triumphal Entry. But my question to you today is this: was this entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? He entered Sunday only to be betrayed by one of the 12 disciples who had been with Him since the beginning of His ministry. He was falsely accused and unjustly tried by the religious leaders of Israel, one of His closest disciples denied even knowing Him multiple times. He was beaten, mocked, scourged, and a crown of thorns - mocking His title of King - was hammered into His skull. Just five days after coming into Jerusalem as a king, He was led out of Jerusalem a criminal carrying his cross on his back.
Argument Introduction: But, my question for you today is this was the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? 
But my question to you today is this: was this entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? He entered Sunday only to be betrayed by one of his 12 disciples. He was falsely accused and unjustly tried by the religious leaders of Israel. One of His closest disciples denied even knowing Him multiple times. He was beaten. He was mocked. He was scourged. A crown of thorns - mocking His title of King - was hammered into His skull. Just five days after coming into Jerusalem as a king, He was led out of Jerusalem a criminal carrying his cross on his back.
From every human vantage point, the triumph of Palm Sunday had transformed into defeat. Surely that was the feeling that the disciples experienced. Five days prior, they received him as King. But Mark’s gospel tells us that after his arrest, they all left Him and fled. So again, my question for you today is this was the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? 
From every human vantage point, the triumph of Palm Sunday had transformed into defeat. Surely that was the feeling that the disciples experienced. Five days prior, they received him as King. But Mark’s gospel tells us that they all left Him and fled. So again, my question for you today is this was the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? 

Transition to

Transition to

Transition to

Transition to
Answer by looking forward to Good Friday 
I want to answer that question for you by looking not at Palm Sunday, but by looking forward to Good Friday, the Day when the King of Isreal was executed as a criminal on a Roman Cross.
I want to answer you today by looking not at Palm Sunday, but looking forward to Good Friday, the Day when the King of Isreal was executed as a criminal on a Roman Cross. That being said, we are going to look forward from Palm Sunday to Good Friday by looking backwards in our Bibles. Our text this Lord’s Day will be from the hymn book of David - turn in your Bibles to .
Answer by looking back at the 5th gospel, the gospel of David -
Answer by looking back at the 5th gospel, the gospel of David -
That being said, we are going to look forward from Palm Sunday to Good Friday by looking backwards in our Bibles. Our text this Lord’s Day will be from the hymn book of David - turn in your Bibles to .

Background Introduction to

Background Introduction to

Background Introduction to

Background Introduction to

Writing as a royal innocent sufferer
Writing as a royal innocent sufferer
is what is called a royal lament psalm. In this psalm of David we find a suffering King who is crying out to His God for deliverance. Not only is the king of suffering, he is suffering innocently. There are no words of penitence or moments of David seeking forgiveness for His sins. No, David is here writing as a royal innocent sufferer. As will become clear, David is also not writing about a particular trial that He had. No, David is looking beyond his current suffering to describe the suffering of the Greater David.
is what is called a royal lament psalm. In this psalm of David we find a suffering King who is crying out to His God for deliverance. Not only is the king of suffering, he is suffering innocently. There are no words of penitence or moments of David seeking forgiveness for His sins. No, David is here writing as a royal innocent sufferer. As will become clear, David is also not writing about a particular trial that He had. No, David is writing looking beyond his current suffering to describe the suffering of the Greater David. is in its entirety, Messianic in nature. This is, as many have called it, The Psalm of the Cross - the Gospel According to David. is referred to or quoted 24 times in the New Testament and 17 of those 24 references occur in the gospel accounts of Jesus’ passion and crucifixion. As Spurgeon puts it, “we may say of this Psalm, “there is none like it.” It is the photograph of our Lord’s saddest hours, the record of his dying words, the lachrymatory of his last tears, the memorial of his expiring joys. We should read reverently, putting off our shoes from off our feet, as Moses did at the burning bush, for if there be holy ground anywhere in Scripture it is in this Psalm.” Dear saints, this morning may we head the words of Spurgeon and approach God’s Word today with awe and reverence as we hear from David as he writes these words seeming to be at the foot of the Cross of Christ itself.
\in its entirety, is Messianic in nature. This is, as many have called it, The Psalm of the Cross - the Gospel According to David. is referred to or quoted 24 times in the New Testament and 17 of those 24 references occur in the gospel accounts of Jesus’ passion and crucifixion. As Spurgeon puts it, “we may say of this Psalm, “there is none like it.” It is the photograph of our Lord’s saddest hours, the record of his dying words, the lachrymatory of his last tears, the memorial of his expiring joys. We should read reverently, putting off our shoes from off our feet, as Moses did at the burning bush, for if there be holy ground anywhere in Scripture it is in this Psalm.” Dear saints, this morning may we head the words of Spurgeon and approach God’s Word today with awe and reverence as we hear from David.
Writing looking forward to the greater David
Writing looking forward to the greater David

Structure 

Structure 

Writing from the foot of the cross
Writing from the foot of the cross

Structure 

Now David wrote this Psalm in two distinct parts and my sermon today will follow that structure. In verses 1-21 we will see the King’s Ultimate Suffering and then in verses 22-31 we will see The King’s Ultimate Salvation.
Now David wrote this Psalm in two distinct parts and my sermon today will follow that structure. In verses 1-21 we will see the King’s Ultimate Suffering and then in verses 22-31 we will see The King’s Ultimate Salvation.
The King’s Ultimate Suffering - vs 1-21

Restate Argument

Restate Argument

The King’s Ultimate Salvation - vs 22-31
Remember, the question I am asking today is this: Was the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? And the Answer that David will give us is a resounding Yes. I want to show you this morning that it was supremely triumphant. For Jesus entered Jerusalem that Palm Sunday as a King so that He would suffer and die the death that a King must die for His people and be saved from death to life and be highly Exalted by the Father that following Sunday as King for all eternity. Put simply, today I want you to see, from this sacred Psalm, that the King’s Ultimate Suffering will lead to the King’s Ultimate Salvation.
Remember, the question I am asking you today is this: Was the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? And the answer that David will give us is a resounding Yes. I want to show you this morning that it was supremely triumphant. For Jesus entered Jerusalem that Palm Sunday as a King so that He would suffer and die the death that a King must die for His people and be saved from death to life and be highly Exalted by the Father that following Sunday as King for all eternity.

Restate Argument

Put simply, today I want you to see, from this sacred Psalm, that the King’s Ultimate Suffering will lead to the King’s Ultimate Salvation.
Was the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem really triumphant? 

Transition

Transition

Transition

Let us begin with the startling words of verse 1.
Let us begin with the first section of this Psalm - the King’s Ultimate Suffering. Look down with me at the startling words of verse 1.
Let us find the first half of our answer as we look at the first half of this psalm - The King’s Ultimate Suffering
The King’s Ultimate Suffering - vs 1-21

The King’s Ultimate Suffering - vs 1-21

Structure

Alternate between complaint and prayer
As the psalm progresses so does the intensity of his anguish and His faith-filled cries to God. It is as if as the hands of death squeeze tighter and tighter around the neck of the King, his cries for divine salvation grow louder and louder.

The Forsaken King - vs 1

1 My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?
1 My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Why are you so far from saving me, from the words of my groaning?
This psalm begins in startling fashion. The King cries out, my God. In this first line David expresses the intimate and special relationship between God and the King.
This was a relationship established by God in His covenant with David - “ (ESV) 14 I will be to him a father, and he shall be to me a son.” Prior to this covenantal moment, that term son had only been bestowed upon the Nation of Israel as a whole. But that changed with the Davidic King - he was to call God Father and the he was to relate to God as son.
Which is why this situation makes no sense to David . David Cries out with a question, why have you forsaken me? The pain and the agony that the king is feeling is due to the sensation of being abandoned. How can and why would a father turn his back on he son whom he loves? David is in distress at the contrast between the wonderful intimate relationship he once had and the far-ness that he now feels from his God. David’s cry was like the call of a lost son searching desperately for the father who’s face he longed to see again.
What makes this divine abandonment even more shocking is that God had turned His face from the king in his darkest hour, look back a verse 1 and then verse 2 “Far from my deliverance are the words of my groaning. 2 O my God, I cry by day, but You do not answer; And by night, but I have no rest.” When the King needs God by His side, God is far. The word for groaning should give us the image or the roar of a lion. It could be also translated as screaming in pain. The King is in distress, He is in miserable pain and His God is far from saving Him. David uses what is called a merism in verse 2. He cries to God by day and by night, which is a way of saying His cries are never ceasing. And yet He has no answer from His Father.
Dear saints, I need to caution you no to read sin into this questioning. This was a question born out of anguish but also out of faith. Though He felt all alone, God was still His God and He never ceased crying out to Him. David uses what is called a merism in verse 2. He cries to God by day and by night, which is a way of saying His cries are never ceasing. And yet He has no answer from His Father.

Why is He Forsaken?

Why are you so far from saving me, from the words of my groaning?
And the question arises: why is the King forsaken by God? Again, I point you back to the Davidic Covenant. It is there, in the other half of that we see this, “When he commits iniquity, I will discipline him with the rod of men, with the stripes of the sons of men,” Here we see that when the Davidic King sins, God will chastise him. He will experience suffering as discipline for His sin.
Now, if you remember what I said at the beginning, David is writing this Psalm as a royal innocent suffer. Surely, there are many times where David suffers for his sin - just read the second half of 2 Samuel. But sometimes, in the Psalms we see David suffering covenantal curses from God, not for his disobedience, but for the disobedience of the people he represented. Such is the nature of God’s King - the King was the representative for His people.
This is what is called corporate solidarity. If we look back in Biblical History we can see this clearly. In , when the people of Israel were seduced into fornication by moabite and Midianite women and they turned to worship the idols of these women, God commanded Moses to hang the leaders of the people on a piece of wood. What we see there is the corporate solidarity - the leaders punished for the sins of the people.
And this is what David is writing of in . He is suffering here, not for his sin, but for the sins of the people he represented. Which is exactly what we see when we look at the greater David hanging on the cross.
Christ quotes these very words in , “46 And about the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” that is, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Like David, Christ was forsaken by the One who called Him “My Son.”
46And about the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” that is, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Rejection contrasted with Past Covenant Faithfulness pt. 1 - vs 3-5

There hung the very Son of God, the Second Member of the Trinity, God very God Himself. He had never experienced anything but perfect love and perfect intimacy with His Father. But there on the cross for the first moment in time and space, the Son, in His humanity, experiences abandonment from His Father.
Now in this moment there was not a seperation in nature or essence or substance within the Trinity. Not for a moment did Jesus cease being the Son of God. But because the Son took the sins of His people upon Himself, the father turned His back. As Habakkuk declared of God in , “Your eyes are too pure to approve evil, and You can not look on wickedness with favor” The Father could not look on the Son for as Peter wrote, He Himself bore our sins in His body ()
The pain and the agony and the shock of this experience was the cause of Christ’s human feelings of distress and agony in the garden of Gethsemane where He confessed to His disciples, “My soul is deeply grieved to the point of death” And as He hangs upon the Cross, with the guilt and curse of His people placed upon Him He cries out My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” It is as if David wrote this song from the foot of the Cross of Christ.
The Father could not look on the Son for as Peter wrote, He Himself bore our sins in His body () He “was delivered up because of our transgression” () and “died for our sins according to the Scriptures” (). He “who knew no sin [became] sin on our behalf” () He Himself bore our sins in His body

Rejection contrasted with Past Covenant Faithfulness pt. 1 - vs 3-5

The King Rejected - vs 2

2 O my God, I cry by day, but you do not answer, and by night, but I find no rest.
and by night, but I find no rest.

God’s Faithfulness to the Forefathers - vs 3-5

In verses 3-5 we see the King turn his mind from his current situation and look back on God’s Faithfulness in the past - verse 33 Yet You are holy, O You who are enthroned upon the praises of Israel. 4 In You our fathers trusted; They trusted and You delivered them. 5 To You they cried out and were delivered; In You they trusted and were not disappointed.”
4 In you our fathers trusted; they trusted, and you delivered them.
He begins by declaring to God - You are holy. God was set apart from sin. He was perfectly Righteous therefore He could not and did not break His covenant promises to Israel’s forefathers. David is longing for God to remember His covenant with Him, for God to hear His groaning as He did with his forefathers. And at the same time, the King is reminding himself of God’s past works of deliverence and rescue to strengthen his faith and steel his resolve.
they trusted, and you delivered them.
5 To you they cried and were rescued; in you they trusted and were not put to shame.
David is longing for God to remember His covenant with Him, for God to hear His groaning as He did with his forefathers. And at the same time, David is reminding himself of God’s past works of deliverence and rescue to strengthen his faith
Alternate between complaint and prayer
in you they trusted and were not put to shame.
As the psalm progresses so does the intensity of his anguish and His faith-filled cries to God. It is as if as the hands of death squeeze tighter and tighter around the neck of the King, his cries for divine salvation grow louder and louder.

Rejection contrasted with Past Covenant Faithfulness pt. 2 - vs 6-10 

The King Rejected - vs 6-8

In verses 6 we see the King return to lamenting his current suffering - 6 But I am a worm and not a man, A reproach of men and despised by the people. In contrast with his normal situation as glorious ruler and king, He is treated as the lowest creature in existence. The abandonment from God and the scorn and the reproach that He experiences from man has brought him to ultimate humiliation and loss of all human dignity.
scorned by mankind and despised by the people.
Again, looking to Christ we are filled with awful wonder. How could the Creator of the Universe, the Lord of Glory be brought down to such depths of humiliation. Spurgeon marvels, “What a contrast between “I AM” and “I am a worm”!”
7 All who see me mock me; they make mouths at me; they wag their heads;
they make mouths at me; they wag their heads;
The scorn of man is described in verses 7 and 8, 7 All who see me sneer at me; They separate with the lip, they wag the head, saying, 8 “Commit yourself to the Lord; let Him deliver him; Let Him rescue him, because He delights in him.” The people shake their head at his shameful appearance and they scoff at His faith in God. His trust and delight in God are called into question. If He truly trusted God, then why hasn’t He been delivered?
8 “He trusts in the Lord; let him deliver him; let him rescue him, for he delights in him!”
Are these not the very insults that were hurled at Christ? and 43, 39 And those who passed by derided him, wagging their heads” saying “43 He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if he desires him. For he said, ‘I am the Son of God.’” The one who made man’s mouth and the one to whom angels vail their faces experienced the scoffing and scorning of vile and wicked men who shook their head at him in disgust.
let him rescue him, for he delights in him!”
God’s Faithfulness Since Conception - vs 9-10

God’s Faithfulness Since Conception - vs 9-10

The reason why these words cut so deep is that their seems to be a hint of truth in their mockery. David looks back to the very beginning of his life to make the case that God had caused David to trust Him from the very beginning. Verse 9, 9 Yet You are He who brought me forth from the womb; You made me trust when upon my mother’s breasts. 10 Upon You I was cast from birth; You have been my God from my mother’s womb.
you made me trust you at my mother’s breasts.
David seeks to remind God that He was the one who was responsible for David’s birth, He was the one who caused David’s life to be sustained at the bosom of His mother. He had experienced the most intimate of relationships with his God from before He breathed His first breath. God was His God from the beginning.
10 On you was I cast from my birth, and from my mother’s womb you have been my God.
and from my mother’s womb you have been my God.

The King’s Plea - vs 11

And these thoughts lead him to conclude the prayer started in the beginning of the psalm - look to verse 11, 11 Be not far from me, for trouble is near; For there is none to help.” See how the psalmist returns to His cry. He felt forsaken. He felt that God was far. He remembered God’s faithfulness to hear the cries of the forefathers. He remembered God’s nearness from the very first movement of his life on earth. And this prompts him to cry out to His God - Be near. Re-engage in the promised covenant relationship. Take action. Come to my aid for there is no one else to help me.

The Suffering King - vs 12-21

Request of Salvation and an Answer - vs 11

11 Be not far from me, for trouble is near, and there is none to help.
for trouble is near,
and there is none to help.
The Execution of the King - vs 12-18

The Execution of the King - vs 12-18

The Actions of His Enemies Vs 12-13

The Actions of His Enemies Vs 12-13
In verses 12-18, David further describes what is clearly the public execution of a king. Verse 12, “12 Many bulls have surrounded me; Strong bulls of Bashan have encircled me. 13 They open wide their mouth at me, As a ravening and a roaring lion.” David uses the poetic metaphors of wild animals to describe his enemies. He begins with the metaphor of a bull of Bashan. Bashan was a lush pasture-like land east of the sea of Galilee and was renowned for its large and powerful bulls. The image David is conveying is that his foes are strong and powerful and all around him ready to pierce him with their horns. He then uses the image of a lion with its mouth gaping open as if to crush him. His enemies have surrounded him and they roar in victory over him.
strong bulls of Bashan surround me;
13 they open wide their mouths at me, like a ravening and roaring lion.
He then uses the image of a lion with its mouth gaping open as if to crush him. His enemies have surrounded him and they roar in victory over him.
like a ravening and roaring lion.
Execution at the Hand of God - vs 14-15

Execution at the Hand of God - vs 14-15

In light of being surrounded and overtaken by such powerful enemies, David details his bodily experience of such torture, vs 14, 14 I am poured out like water,” It is as if his body has lost all shape and form and is totally dissolved. He continues, “all my bones are out of joint;” It is as if he has been stretched out on a torture rack and the connective tissue holding his bones together has ripped apart leaving his shoulders and his knees and his hips to dislocate. Is this not what we see when we look upon our Savior who was violently hoisted up on a piece of wood, jolting his joints apart.
and all my bones are out of joint;
my heart is like wax; it is melted within my breast;
He declares, “My heart is like wax; It is melted within me.” As He experiences the wrath of God the seat of his will and courage has melted away, the vigour of life has vanished within him. Dear Sinner, see the effects of God’s wrath on the God-man and tremble lest you not fear the wrath of God against your sin. May the vision of the suffering Christ melt your hearts of stone so that you cry out to Him to save you from His wrath.
it is melted within my breast;
“if the heart of Christ, the Lion of the tribe of Judah, melted at it, what heart can endure or hands be strong, when God deals with them in his wrath?”
He cries out in, verse 15, “15 my strength is dried up like a potsherd, and my tongue sticks to my jaws See how the God who created every river, every lake and every ocean is filled with thirst on the cross.
15 my strength is dried up like a potsherd, and my tongue sticks to my jaws; you lay me in the dust of death.
He concludes, you lay me in the dust of death.” Notice who is responsible. It is not the bulls or the lions or the dogs who lay the King in thee grave. It is God. Death lies at the end of this suffering and it is God who is responsible for this result.
and my tongue sticks to my jaws;
We are reminded of Peter’s words in , 23 this Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men.” Isaiah described this King, this suffering Servant, as smitten by God and prophesied in that “it was the will of the Lord to crush him” The King here is dying at the decree and the plan of God alone.
you lay me in the dust of death.
Explanation for this Accusation - vs 16-18

Explanation for this Accusation - vs 16-18

In verses 16-18 David explains his perception that God has cursed him to die. Let’s start in verse 16, 16 For dogs have surrounded me; A band of evildoers has encompassed me;” These dogs aren’t your normal American lap dogs. No, dogs in that time and in that culture were filthy animals who roamed in packs, snarling and scavenging for food. David sees his enemies surrounding him like wild dogs waiting to devour his dead body.
a company of evildoers encircles me;
David continues, “they pierced my hands and my feetNow dear friends, I have hinted that David was alluding to and writing of a royal execution by hanging. However, what we have here is a description to a particular method of hanging that had not yet been invented for hundreds of years. The piercing of hands and feet was a characteristic of crucifixion and this was written hundreds of years before the barbarians invented this method of execution, and hundreds of years before the Romans perfected it.
(like a lion) they have pierced (or torn) my hands and feet
This was not something Christian interpreters added in. No, the greek translation of the Old Testament, the Septuagint, translates the word here as pierced. And that was written just over a hundred years before Jesus was even born. This is a graphic description of the crucifixion that was written a thousand years before heh death of Christ. What is happening here is a miraculous accuracy of prophecy. This is a testimony to the clarity and truthfulness of scripture.
17 I can count all my bones
This reference to piercing is picked up by Isaiah in , “But he was pierced for our transgressions” Let us pause dear saints and see the wounds our savior bore for us. Hear the words of Paul, 13 And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses, 14 by canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross” as the famous hymn of Charles Wesley goes, “And can it be that I should gain An interest in the Savior’s blood? Died He for me, who caused His pain? For me, who Him to death pursued? Amazing love! how can it be That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me? By His wounds we have been healed! Amen!
17 I can count all my bones— they stare and gloat over me;
13 And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses, 14 by canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross
The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.
they stare and gloat over me;
The king continues to cry out in agony in verse 17, 17 I can count all my bones.”His bones are easily identified because they have been torn out of joint and perhaps have even been exposed by the ripping of his flesh.
Not only are his bones exposed before him but his nakedness is exposed before the people, “They look, they stare at me; “18 They divide my garments among them, And for my clothing they cast lots.” ” His death was a foregone conclusion in the mind of his enemies so they divided up his clothing. Here again we see an amazing correspondence to the gospel accounts, Mathew 27:35, 35 And when they had crucified him, they divided his garments among them by casting lots.” Spurgeon makes this stunning point when he comments on this verse, “The first Adam made us all naked, and therefore the second Adam became naked that he might clothe our naked souls.”
18 they divide my garments among them, and for my clothing they cast lots.
Spurgeon, C. H. (n.d.). The treasury of David: (Vol. 1, p. 330). London; Edinburgh; New York: Marshall Brothers.
His death was a foregone conclusion in the mind of his enemies so they divided up his clothing. Here again we see an amazing correspondence to the gospel accounts, Mathew 27:35, 35 And when they had crucified him, they divided his garments among them by casting lots.”
and for my clothing they cast lots.

Deuteronomic Connection

Point out chiasm
His body and his enemies
With his bones and his enemies are the final witness to the reality that God has cursed Him to die, the King is moved to one last prayer.
Importance of Hanging Imagery
Deuteronomic Law
Royal Exampls
Conclusion:
The King bears the Curse
Jesus did not die the shameful death of a criminal but the triumphant death of a king

Repeated Request for Salvation - vs 19-21a

With his bones and his enemies as the final witness to the reality that God has cursed Him to die, the King is moved to one last prayer - verse 19, 19 But You, O Lord, be not far off; O You my help, hasten to my assistance. ” See how He cries to His covenant God - YHWH. He is leaning on God’s covenant faithfulness as He pleads for His promised presence. He then refers to YHWH as “my help” stressing the intimate covenant relationship between them.
O you my help, come quickly to my aid!
20 Deliver my soul from the sword, my precious life from the power of the dog!
It appears that the King is on the brink of death as He cries out for salvation from His God, verse 20, 20 Deliver my soul from the sword, My only life from the power of the dog. 21 Save me from the lion’s mouth; From the horns of the wild oxen You answer me.” Notice again the poetic metaphor for his enemy, this time in reverse order. They are murderous, unclean, ravenous and irresistible. The psalmist pleads for escape from an inescapable situation. All previous petitions and appeals for God to deliver have fallen to the ground unanswered. And yet what we see is the Psalmist continue in faithful prayer for deliverance.
my precious life from the power of the dog!
21 Save me from the mouth of the lion!
However, what David sees as salvation from death in the last minute becomes something even greater in the greater David. After committing His Spirit to His Father, as Luke records, the Father saves him not from death but out of death. What happens in the margins between verse 20 and verse 21 is a resurrection.
You have rescued me from the horns of the wild oxen!

Deuteronomic Connection

Now As I alluded to at the beginning, David is writing of a King suffering the curse of His people’s disobedience. And he was not just writing of ordinary suffering but of the worst suffering imaginable - that of a King hung on a tree.
Importance of Hanging Imagery
Deuteronomic Law
In Deuteronomic law, the death of hanging was the ultimate punishment for the ultimate crime. As the Law in reads, “cursed is the one who hangs upon a tree” The very wrath of God rested upon the man who was hung for he committed the highest treason against God and was deemed to be fully condemned. Now if you were to look at Biblical accounts of the application of this law of hanging you would find that each instance involves the hanging of a royal individual whether it be a king, a descendent of a king or a usurper king. Only the death of a king could match the weighty demands of the sins committed in these situations.
Royal Exampls
Conclusion:
The King bears the Curse
Jesus did not die the shameful death of a criminal but the triumphant death of a king
Which is why David alludes to the execution of a king in . The Executed King of is a King who is bearing the curse of His people’s sins. As Isaiah, who is writing of this same Davidic King - the Suffering Servant, puts it in , 4 Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet we esteemed him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted. 5 But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed. 6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all.”
Gal 3:13
Spurgeon quote
The entry of Jesus was truly triumphant for he entered Jerusalem to die the death of the King where He bore the curse of His people’s sins. 
As Isaiah, who is writing of this same David King - the Suffering Servant, puts it in Isaiah 534-6, “4 Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet we esteemed him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted. 5 But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed. 6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all.”
I tell you all of this to make it clear to you that the entry of Jesus was truly triumphant for he entered Jerusalem to die the death, not of a criminal, but of the King who became a curse for us. He was not a victim but the Victor. Friday was not a failure. It was the perfect fulfillment of God’s sovereign plan to save His people from their sins.

Transition

You have rescued me from the horns of the wild oxen!
Now let us turn to second half of our psalm where we will witness the King’s Ultimate Salvation 
But this glorious Psalm does not end here. In between verse 21 and 22 we have a resurrection. Verse 21 ended with a cry for salvation and if you look closely at the last phrase of verse 21 we see something very interesting. The NAS renders it “you answer me” but the verb tense here is perfect. It should read YOU HAVE ANSWERED me! Verse 21 is the cry of salvation. The King, was no longer forsaken by the Father. He was saved, not from dying, but out of death itself. As David wrote in an earlier Psalm, , “10 For you will not abandon - you will not forsake - my soul to Sheol, or let your holy one see corruption.”
The King, was no longer forsaken by the Father. He was saved, not from dying, but out of death itself. As David wrote in an earlier Psalm, , “10 For you will not abandon - you will not forsake - my soul to Sheol, or let your holy one see corruption.”
Which is why our second section - The King’s Ultimate Salvation - begins with the loud praise of the Risen King

The King’s Ultimate Salvation - vs 22-31

The impact of God’s Salvation on Israel - vs 22-26

Call to national worship - vs 22-23

Call to national worship - vs 22-23

“22 I will tell of Your name to my brethren; In the midst of the assembly I will praise You.” Dear friends these are the very words of Jesus. And don’t take my word for it, this is the interpretation of the Author of Hebrews, 9 But we do see Him who was made for a little while lower than the angels, namely, Jesus, because of the suffering of death crowned with glory and honor, so that by the grace of God He might taste death for everyone. 10 For it was fitting for Him, for whom are all things, and through whom are all things, in bringing many sons to glory, to perfect the author of their salvation through sufferings. 11 For both He who sanctifies and those who are sanctified are all from one Father; for which reason He is not ashamed to call them brethren, 12 saying, “I will proclaim Your name to My brethren, In the midst of the congregation I will sing Your praise.”
O you my help, come quickly to my aid!
O you my help, come quickly to my aid!
20 Deliver my soul from the sword,
On the Cross, our savior could count all of His bones, but now, and this is intended word play from David, now He will recount the Worship of His God. According to we see that these brethren are those who have been sanctified and received the salvation that Christ authored by becoming like them and bringing them into His holy family.Before, Christ was surrounded by a band of inhuman evil doers but now He is in the midst of the assembly and it is there that He signs praises to His God.
my precious life from the power of the dog!
20 Deliver my soul from the sword,
in the midst of the congregation I will praise you:
22 I will tell (count/recount) of your name to my brothers; in the midst of the congregation I will praise you:
21 Save me from the mouth of the lion!
my precious life from the power of the dog!
Before, Christ was surrounded by a band of inhuman evil doers but now He is in the midst of the assembly and it is there that He signs praises to His God.
You have rescued me from the horns of the wild oxen!
21 Save me from the mouth of the lion!
In verse 23, Christ then turns to the congregation and leads them in worship, 23 You who fear the Lord, praise Him; All you descendants of Jacob, glorify Him, And stand in awe of Him, all you descendants of Israel.” Here it is made clear that it is specifically the believing Israelites who are exhorted to praise. They are the ones who fear the Lord - the offspring of Jacob and the offspring of Israel. Also note the three imperatives that should characterize their worship - they should Praise Him, honor Him and stand in awe of Him.
You have rescued me from the horns of the wild oxen!
23 You who fear the Lord, praise him! All you offspring of Jacob, glorify him, and stand in awe of him, all you offspring of Israel!

Reason for worship - vs 24

Reason for worship - vs 24
Here it is made clear that it is specifically the believing Israelites who are exhorted to praise. They are the ones who fear the Lord - the offspring of Jacob and the offspring of Israel. Also note the three imperatives that should characterize their worship - they should Praise Him, honor Him and stand in awe.
All you offspring of Jacob, glorify him,

The King’s Praise and Thanksgiving Feast - vs 24

and stand in awe of him, all you offspring of Israel! Reason for worship - vs 24
In verse 24 we see the King’s reason for praise, 24 For He has not despised nor abhorred the affliction of the afflicted; Nor has He hidden His face from him; But when he cried to Him for help, He heard.” God did not reject Him during His worst trial and He heard the cry of the afflicted Christ. He delivered the King and did not hide His face or turn His ear forever.
the affliction of the afflicted,
and he has not hidden his face from him,
but has heard, when he cried to him.
Personal Response - vs 25

The King’s Praise and the King’s Feast - vs 25-26

Now, not only was God the object of the King’s praise, He was also the source - verse 25, 25 From You comes my praise in the great assembly; What glorious and joyful noise is that which sings praises up to God and is manufactured inwardly by God.
On the Cross, our savior could count all of His bones, but now, and this is intended word play from David, now He will the Worship of His God. According to Hebrews 2 we see that these brethren are those who have been sanctified and received the salvation that Christ authored by becoming like them and bringing them into His holy family. Oh may we learn from our Lord here and see that one of the greatest ways of showing our thankfulness for being delivered is to tell our brethren what He has done for us.
25 From you comes my praise in the great congregation; my vows I will perform before those who fear him.
Now I might dare to say that I have experienced such worship before. Sometimes we pastors are given the privilege to go to a pastors conference, and let me tell you, I have never heard greater praise to God than the singing of 3,000 pastors. Dear saints may we pray for such praise to be produced in us when we gather again!
Before, Christ was surrounded by a band of inhuman evil doers but now He is in the midst of the assembly and it is there that He signs praises to His God.
my vows I will perform before those who fear him.
The king continues, look back at verse 25, 25 I shall pay my vows before those who fear Him.” These vows most likely refer to vows of thanksgiving made in anguish. And the reason for this interpretation is the mention of a feast in verse 26. In and we find instructions for fulfilling such vows. A ceremony was prescribed where the one who vowed fulfills the vow with a sacrifice similar to a peace offering where a part of the sacrifice was dedicated to God and a part of it was consumed in a banquet feast that lasted as long as two days.
In verse 23, Christ then turns to the congregation and leads them in worship, “23 You who fear the Lord, praise Him; All you descendants of Jacob, glorify Him, And stand in awe of Him, all you descendants of Israel.”

National Implications- vs 26

National Implications- vs 26
See here how Christ celebrates such a feast of thanksgiving with the lowest and poorest of souls - verse 26, 26 The afflicted shall eat and be satisfied; those who seek him shall praise the Lord!” It just like the parable of the banquet in where the crippled and the poor and the blind and the lame are brought in to feast with the Master. There at His table they shall eat, be satisfied and praise the Lord.
Here it is made clear that it is specifically the believing Israelites who are exhorted to praise. They are the ones who fear the Lord - the offspring of Jacob and the offspring of Israel. Also note the three imperatives that should characterize their worship - they should Praise Him, honor Him and stand in awe.
26 The afflicted shall eat and be satisfied; those who seek him shall praise the Lord! May your hearts live forever!
those who seek him shall praise the Lord!
The King then blesses the attendants to His banquet saying, “May your hearts live forever!” This isn’t a temporary blessing - no the one who defeated death blesses those who seek Him with eternal life. His deliverance not only secures them sustenance, it secures their salvation.
May your hearts live forever!

The impact of God’s Salvation on the World - vs 27-31

Call to global worship - vs 27-29

Just as we gentiles were starting to feel left out we see that this celebration of the Salvation of the Risen King expands beyond Jerusalem, beyond Judea, beyond Samaria until - verse 27, 27 All the ends of the earth will remember and turn to the Lord, And all the families of the nations will worship before You. 28 For the kingdom is the Lord’s And He rules over the nations.” The fruits of the King’s deliverance are transcendent and they spread out in space and time until all the gentile nations are included.
and turn to the Lord,
Was this not the instant effect of the death of our Savior on the Roman centurion? Mathew 27:54 54 When the centurion and those who were with him, keeping watch over Jesus, saw the earthquake and what took place, they were filled with awe and said, “Truly this was the Son of God!”
and all the families of the nations
At Babel the nations were scattered for the pride against YHWH but because of the King’s triumphant victory on the Cross they will remember Him and turn back to the LORD. In this we also see the fulfilment of the Promise made to Abraham that through Him and His seed all the families of the earth would be blessed. This will come to pass for the Kingdom is the Lords and His rule is not over just Israel but all the nations.
shall worship before you.

Reason for worship - vs 28

So great is the salvation of Christ the Greater David, that all nations will worship God as they experience His salvation and reign and rule as well. For this reason, our King commands His saints then and His saints today to Go and make disciples of all the nations - we are commissioned to conquer the world with His truth so that in the end we shall see and join in “a great multitude which no one could count, from every nation and all tribes and peoples and tongues, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, and palm branches were in their hands; 10 and they cry out with a loud voice, saying, “Salvation to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb.”
28 For kingship belongs to the Lord, and he rules over the nations.
In verse 29, we see the invitation to the King’s banquet extended, 29 All the prosperous of the earth will eat and worship,” See that even the prosperous and rich will join at the feast. Again this is a merism that signifies that all peoples - poor and rich, jew and gentile will join at the banquet table of the King.
and he rules over the nations.

All shall have victory over death - vs 29

Look again at verse 29 and see that the invitation extends to as the ESV puts it, “even the one who could not keep himself alive.” See again how the victory of the Risen King has not only brought a world wide rule, and has not only united all peoples in worship, but has also granted victory over death itself. Again we see this when we look to the immediate effects of our Savior’s death, The tombs also were opened. And many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised, 53 and coming out of the tombs after his resurrection they went into the holy city and appeared to many.”
29 All the prosperous of the earth eat and worship; before him shall bow all who go down to the dust, even the one who could not keep himself alive.
before him shall bow all who go down to the dust,
even the one who could not keep himself alive.

This salvation extends to future generations - vs 30-31a

The Psalmist end with a proclamation that encompasses generations, even us today. 30 Posterity will serve Him; It will be told of the Lord to the coming generation.” See how the King’s court will be filled with the offspring of His salvation. Further, the glorious news of the saving work of YHWH will be proclaimed to future generations.
Verse 31 declares that this message will be that of the righteousness of God, 31 They will come and will declare His righteousness To a people who will be born, that He has performed it”Is this not the great gospel of Christ? Are these not the words given to us by Paul in , 16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. 17 For in it the righteousness of God is revealed” David is declaring that the news of the salvation of the King is so glorious it will spread not just to the ends of the earth but to the ends of time as well.
31 they shall come and proclaim his righteousness to a people yet unborn,
The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles. Sounds a lot like to me does it not?

Argument

I therefore conclude, based on the Testimony of that the entry of Jesus was truly triumphant for he entered Jerusalem not only to die the death of the King where He bore the curse of His people’s sins but also to claim the victory over death so that His people would be saved to eternal life in Him. This is the good news of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Amen! Let me conclude by making four brief applications.

God has done it - it is finished - vs 31b

Conclusion

Exhortation to Apply

Evangelistic Appeal to the Non-believer

For those of you who do not know Jesus Christ, I ask, is not your heart drawn to the one who loves sinners this much. That he would take on the pain, the shame, the scorn, the suffering for those who were His enemies when He died for them. Dear friend look upon Him. He is so loving, He is so willing to forgive. Run to Him! Call upon His name. He is the friend of sinners. He will take you in and make you clean and pure. He will prepare a place for you in heaven and He will come again and take you into His house where you will fellowship with Him forever.
Believe that in His death He bore God’s wrath that you deserved in 
For those who would find themselves lukewarm. Perhaps the fire and passion you once had for Christ has since faded. Read this Psalm, hear again of the intense and purposeful suffering of Christ for you. Let your heart be warmed by His deep love. Let your heart be filled with joy at His proclamations of praise and invitations to dine with Him at His banquet table.

Bridge Application to Non-believer and Believer

For those of you who are fearful of the cost that you must pay to be Christ’s disciple, of all the sin you must give up, of the pains and trials that might come, of the persecution that may come if you preach the gospel to the nations or to your neighbors all around you. Think of the cost that He paid to make you His. Oh dear friends, just as the disciples received Christ on Palm Sunday, receive Him as your King today and become His disciple.
Receive your King as His disciple -

Application to Believer

Do not grow weary in your following after Him, instead, be filled with hope that the Good Shepherd will not forsake you the valley of the shadow of Death but that He will raise you up to eternal life - ,
Lastly, for those of you who are suffering a very difficult trial whether it be emotionally, financially, relationally, you have a Savior who knows what it is to suffer and He is sympathetic to you in your suffering. He knows personally what it is to endure the hurt and the pain of living in this fallen world. Come to him, tell Him of your suffering and He will receive you. Look to Him and follow His example. Our God has promised that He will never leave you nor forsake you. There is a reason why is placed after . The LORD was David’s Shepherd, He was the Greater David’s Shepherd and He is your Shepherd too. Do not grow weary in your following after Him, instead, be filled with hope that the Good Shepherd will not forsake you the valley of the shadow of Death but that He will raise you up to eternal life.
May those who have been delivered Praise Him and glorify Him and Stand in Awe of Christ our King
Do not grow weary in your following after Him, instead, be filled with hope that the Good Shepherd will not forsake you the valley of the shadow of Death but that He will raise you up to eternal life - ,

Climactic Conclusion - vs 31b

Summary of Argument
Jesus triumphantly entered Jerusalem that sunday to claim His crown as Messiah King, bear the curse for His people’s sin and make the way for the salvation of Jew and Gentile, rich and poor, for those who have died and for those who have yet been born. There is no other way. Only Jesus loves sinners this much. Only Jesus can triumphantly proclaim it is finished! 
He is the One who triumphantly entered Jerusalem that Palm Sunday to claim His crown as Messiah King by bearing the curse for His people’s sin. He is the One who, through His suffering, made the way for the salvation of Jew and Gentile, rich and poor, for those who have died and for those who have yet been born.
Jesus triumphantly entered Jerusalem that sunday to claim His crown as Messiah King, bear the curse for His people’s sin and make the way for the salvation of Jew and Gentile, rich and poor, for those who have died and for those who have yet been born. There is no other way. Only Jesus loves sinners this much. Only Jesus can triumphantly proclaim it is finished! 
Look one last time to the last line of , “he has done it” which sounds so much like the final victory cry of our King on the cross, “it is finished!”  
that he has done it.
There is no other way. Only Jesus loves sinners this much. Only Jesus has the power to save. Turn from your sin and turn to Him! Believe in Him! Trust in Him! Praise Him! Glorify Him! Stand in Awe of Him! You will inherit eternal life if you are in Him. This is the Gospel Truth. We who believe can have confidence in this truth for as the last line of puts it, “he has done it” which sounds so much like the final victory cry of our King on the cross, “it is finished!”  
Dear friends, know this: Jesus triumphantly entered Jerusalem that Palm Sunday to claim His crown as Messiah King, bear the curse for His people’s sin and make the way for the salvation of Jew and Gentile, rich and poor, for those who have died and for those who have yet been born. There is no other way. Only Jesus loves sinners this much. Only Jesus has the power to save. Turn from your sin and turn to Him! Believe in Him! Trust in Him! Praise Him! Follow Him and you will have eternal life. This is the Gospel Truth. We who believe can have confidence in this truth for as the last line of puts it, “he has done it” which sounds so much like the final victory cry of our King on the cross, “it is finished!”  
For, as the last line of puts it, “he has done it” which sounds so much like the final victory cry of our King on the cross, “it is finished!”  

Prayer & Benediction

Jesus is our Triumphant Crucified King. He bore our curse and He purchased for us eternal life in Him. He has declared it is finished! My prayer for you today is, as Paul Prays in - “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith—that you, being rooted and grounded in love, 18 may have strength to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, 19 and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled with all the fullness of God.
(ESV) 14 For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, 15 from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named, 16 that according to the riches of his glory he may grant you to be strengthened with power through his Spirit in your inner being, 17 so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith—that you, being rooted and grounded in love, 18 may have strength to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, 19 and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled with all the fullness of God.
20 Now to him who is able to do far more abundantly than all that we ask or think, according to the power at work within us, 21 to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever. Amen.
20 Now to him who is able to do far more abundantly than all that we ask or think, according to the power at work within us, 21 to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever. and all the church said, Amen.
I want to end with the prayer of Paul in , 14 For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, 15 from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named, 16 that according to the riches of his glory he may grant you to be strengthened with power through his Spirit in your inner being, 17 so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith—that you, being rooted and grounded in love, 18 may have strength to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, 19 and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled with all the fullness of God. 20 Now to him who is able to do far more abundantly than all that we ask or think, according to the power at work within us, 21 to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever. and all the church said, Amen.
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