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Like Minds Think Alike

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Like-Minded

If you grew up in the church of Christ you heard phrases like “book chapter and verse”. You heard phrases like, we speak were the bible speaks and we are silent where the bible is silent. We hear biblical phrases consistently that speak to our context of A Capella singing, such as let us sing and make melody in our hearts, let us make a joyful noise unto God. Consistent across our brotherhood that you will find in every part of the country. Truth be told those traditional staples are very important and a key piece to the historical ideology of the church of Christ, but that does not determine true “like-mindedness”. Like-mindedness is sustained by the heart of each and every one of us. The bible is not silent on love, encouragement, edification, or bearing the burdens of one another.
There are things that are consistent across our brotherhood that you will find in every part of the country. Truth be told those traditional staples are very important and a key piece to the historical ideology of the church of Christ, but that does not determine true “like-mindedness”. Like-mindedness is sustained by the heart of each and every one of us. The bible is not silent on love, encouragement, edification, or bearing the burdens of one another.
Even in the midst of shelter in place, I can still bear burdens of my family, I can still be an encouragement to my family, I can still send a loving text message, an edifying text message. If my like mindedness is reduced to worship styles, location, and order of worship I have missed the blessing of what God is doing in this moment.

We Owe it To The Weak

The strong must bear the weak. Helping the weak grow takes patience and sacrificial love.
Our inability to help the weak is a sign of weakness and a slap in the face to a Jesus that exposes the fact that we all have some sort of weakness. Regardless of the weakness none of us can save ourselves.
· “We then” is an effect of something stated before. spends time talking about how the strong should be mindful of the weak and the weak should not resent the strong. Because of this bearing the burdens of one another is necessary.
“We then” is an effect of something stated before. spends time talking about how the strong should be mindful of the weak and the weak should not resent the strong. Because of this bearing the burdens of one another is necessary.
Be Like Minded Toward One Another
We then who are strong ought to bear with the scruples of the weak, and not to please ourselves.
· “We then” is an effect of something stated before. spends time talking about how the strong should be mindful of the weak and the weak should not resent the strong. Because of this bearing the burdens of one another is necessary.
· Strong (defined) referring to competence and skill.
1. dunatos (δυνατός, 1415), “powerful, mighty,” is translated “strong,” in , where the “strong” are those referred to in ch. 14, in contrast to “the weak in faith,” those who have scruples in regard to eating meat and the observance of days; , where the strength lies in bearing sufferings in the realization that the endurance is for Christ’s sake; , where “ye are strong” implies the good spiritual condition which the apostle desires for the church at Corinth in having nothing requiring his exercise of discipline (contrast No. 2 in ). See able, C, No. 1, mighty, possible, power.[1]
1475 גִּבּוֹר (gib·bôr): adj. [see also 1475.5]; ≡ Str 1368; TWOT 310b—1. LN 79.62–79.69 mighty, powerful, i.e., pertaining to being strong (; ); 2. LN 76 mighty, i.e., pertaining to having political or military force (); 3. LN 9 unit: אֵל גִּבּוֹר (ʾēl gib·bôr) Mighty God, i.e., title of One on David’s throne (; ), note: the idiom may have a focus on the might or power of the individual and not the deity, based on the meaning of אֵל (ʾēl), though others see it as a crux for the deity of Messiah, see also domain LN 12; 4. LN 37.48–37.95 unit: אֵל גִּבּוֹר (ʾēl gib·bôr) mighty leader (+)[2]
· Scruples of the weak – the incapability’s, the impossibilities, the inadequacies of the weak.
The interesting thing about this idea of weakness is the fact that there is a common weakness or incapability that we all have and that is the ability to save ourselves from sin.
So regardless how strong you might think you are, there’s one capability we are all carrying. Which then helps us understand the “weakness” or incapability of the Law versus the strength or dunatos of Jesus Christ.
Application – what the gospel did for us we should do for each other.
Incapability’s or what we deem as weaknesses are not always the fault of the person.
· I have a friend of mine who is blind and when he is with you, you must guide him to various destinations. Although he has a walking stick and can get there on his own it’s a comfort to him and me alike when someone can help him.
· The leveling ground is the fact that no matter how strong or weak you might be, it’s the fact that we all need Jesus.
2 Let each of us please his neighbor for his good, leading to edification.
· To please or the accommodate
· ἀρέσκω implies the establishment of a positive relationship between two factors and therefore “to make peace” or “to reconcile.” From the original legal sphere the term passed into the aesthetic in the sense of “to please” someone. The various constructions from the present stem, e.g., ἄρεσκος, ἀρεσκεύω, and ἀρεσκεία, express the action of trying to please, and easily come to have, though not exclusively, an unfavourable sense. Constructions from the general verbal stem, e.g., ἀρεστός, εὐάρεστος and εὐαρεστέω, denote something which positively evokes pleasure.[3]
· This ain’t about you, when we begin to accommodate people because of our pride, we are doing it for ourselves and not to glorify God. (For his good).
o 3208 טוֹבָה (ṭô·ḇā(h)): n.fem.; ≡ Str 2896; TWOT 793a—1. LN 88.1–88.11 good deed, fair thing, i.e., an action which is not evil, but a positive moral nature, implying a positive attitude or favor toward the object of the good deed (); 2. LN 65.20–65.29 good things, i.e., objects or events which have a good, positive quality or value (); 3. LN 57.71–57.124 bounty, prosperity, i.e., have an excessive accumulation or collection of things (); 4. LN 25.116–25.134 satisfaction, joy, i.e., a feeling or attitude of happiness ([EB 18]); 5. LN 88.66–88.74 kindness, graciousness, i.e., a moral quality related to goodness, and manifests itself in acts of undeserved benefits (), see also 3202; note: further study may yield more domains[4]
3 For even Christ did not please Himself; but as it is written, “The reproaches of those who reproached You fell on Me.”
Cited from :
o and the New Testament sees Christ prefigured in the singer’s zeal for God’s house and in his sufferings (9; cf. 21). But the very juxtaposition of David cursing his tormentors and Jesus praying for his, brings out the gulf between type and antitype, and indeed between accepted attitudes among saints of the Old Testament and the New. This is discussed further in the Introduction, 5, pp. 45ff.[5]
and the New Testament sees Christ prefigured in the singer’s zeal for God’s house and in his sufferings (9; cf. 21). But the very juxtaposition of David cursing his tormentors and Jesus praying for his, brings out the gulf between type and antitype, and indeed between accepted attitudes among saints of the Old Testament and the New. This is discussed further in the Introduction, 5, pp. 45ff.[5]
o The fact that both halves of verse 9 were to find fulfilment in Christ (; ) puts the matter into so new a context that the Christian reader finds it difficult to enter fully into David’s bewilderment, as distinct from his pain. The ‘weakness of God’ now makes sense, for it is redemptive; and ‘to suffer dishonour for the name’ () is, despite its cost, a compliment.[6]
§
o Bearing the burdens of the weak might make you look weak based on association. Nonetheless remember what Jesus did for us.
o Reproaches or act of disparagement that results in disgrace, reproach, reviling, disgrace, insult[7]
The acts of disgrace that people have done to us even fall on Jesus. If he’ll allow the wrongdoings, we’ve experienced to be a burden for him, we should be able to forgive, and we should be able to co-labor in the burden carrying of those who may be weak.
Christ came for us, He is our master but his goal was service not condemnation.
4 For whatever things were written before were written for our learning, that we through the patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope.
Even beyond the idea that we have an example of in writing as well as in example. Nonetheless these things were written for our learning so that we have patience, comfort, and hope.
(Patience or VHS) 5705 ὑπομονή (hypomonē), ῆς (ēs), ἡ (): n.fem.; ≡ Str 5281; TDNT 4.581—LN 25.174 endurance, perseverance, patience (; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; , ; .r.)[8]
5 Now may the God of patience and comfort grant you to be like-minded toward one another, according to Christ Jesus,
· Now may God grant: an “attainable wish” (according to Jewett and Kotansky in “Romans: A Commentary) how can God grant us unity or like mindedness if we are not praying for it.
o As in other homiletic benedictions, the verb is in the optative mood, δῴη (“may he give”), which was typical of LXX prayers and wishes even though its more general usage was becoming obsolete in the first century.106[9]
· It’s the patience of God that allows us to be likeminded. When you are able to be like-minded it’s all due to the patience and comfort of God. Like-mindedness is the first step to unity, it’s important that we understand what like-mindedness means.
o 5858 φρονέω (phroneō): vb.; ≡ Str 5426; TDNT 9.220—1. LN 26.16 have attitude, regard (); 2. LN 30.20 ponder, set one’s mind on (); 3. LN 31.1 hold a view, hold a belief (); 4. LN 87.12 honor, acknowledge high status (); 5. LN 88.209 be haughty (; +), see 5734[10]
The like-mindedness in not just something we think but it is shown by how we are within our interactions toward one another. Toward essentially means among not unto.
The like-mindedness is to acknowledge with high honor amongst each other.
According to Christ Jesus, our unification, our collective theology begins and ends with Jesus.
6 that you may with one mind and one mouth glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.[11]
· We can be of one mind and one mouth no matter our physical location.
One mindedness is not tied to a location. We are all Christians if I’m at Genessee, Greenville Avenue, Metropolitan church if the gospel is preached and I’m worshipping God in spirit and in truth it might even be in someone’s house I’m still likeminded.
The expression τὸ αὑτὸ φρονεῖν (“the same mind/ thinking”) was used in 12:16* in the sense of mental equality between different groups and persons that allows cooperation; it was defined by being drawn “toward” the lowly and avoiding being wise-minded in oneself. It did not involve agreeing on particulars or eliminating cultural conflicts, because the argument in explicitly rejected the ideal of ideological conformity. To have the same mind “among”112 one another is therefore to acknowledge every group’s obedience to the same Lord and hence their legitimacy. It is therefore crucial to take the phrase κατὰ Χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν as meaning “according to Jesus Christ” whose example of bearing reproaches for others has just been affirmed in 15:3*.113 This produces a distinctive form of same-mindedness because the focus is no longer on achieving unanimity in doctrine or practice but rather on bearing abuse for each other and pleasing each other as Christ did. This allows the theological, liturgical, cultural, and ethical differences between the “weak” and the “strong” to remain in force within a broader community of mutual respect and love. [12]
o 16 Be of the same mind toward one another. Do not set your mind on high things, but associate with the humble. Do not be wise in your own opinion.[13]
[1] Vine, W. E., Unger, M. F., & White, W., Jr. (1996). Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Vol. 2, p. 605). Nashville, TN: T. Nelson.
[2] Swanson, J. (1997). Dictionary of Biblical Languages with Semantic Domains : Hebrew (Old Testament) (electronic ed.). Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
[3] Foerster, W. (1964–). ἀρέσκω, ἀνθρωπάρεσκος, ἀρεσκεία, ἀρεστός, εὐάρεστος, εὐαρεστέω. G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley, & G. Friedrich (Eds.), Theological dictionary of the New Testament (electronic ed., Vol. 1, p. 455). Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.
[4] Swanson, J. (1997). Dictionary of Biblical Languages with Semantic Domains : Hebrew (Old Testament) (electronic ed.). Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
[5] Kidner, D. (1973). : an introduction and commentary (Vol. 15, p. 264). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
[6] Kidner, D. (1973). : an introduction and commentary (Vol. 15, p. 265). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
[7] Arndt, W., Danker, F. W., Bauer, W., & Gingrich, F. W. (2000). A Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament and other early Christian literature (3rd ed., p. 710). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
[8] Swanson, J. (1997). Dictionary of Biblical Languages with Semantic Domains: Greek (New Testament) (electronic ed.). Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
[9] Jewett, R., & Kotansky, R. D. (2006). Romans: A commentary. (E. J. Epp, Ed.) (p. 883). Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.
[10] Swanson, J. (1997). Dictionary of Biblical Languages with Semantic Domains: Greek (New Testament) (electronic ed.). Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
[11] The New King James Version. (1982). (). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.
[12] Jewett, R., & Kotansky, R. D. (2006). Romans: A commentary. (E. J. Epp, Ed.) (p. 884). Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.
[13] The New King James Version. (1982). (). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.
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