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Bible Study- Matthew 5

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Bible Study-

Opening Thoughts
Sermons upon sermons have been written based on known by many as The Sermon on the Mount.
Crowds from Galilee, The Decapolis, Jerusalem, Judea and the region across the Jordan are following Jesus.
With the attention of large numbers of people this becomes an opportunity for Jesus to sit down and teach.
Jesus begins teaching about the nature of the Kingdom of Heaven and the life of those who desire to be part of it
Jesus is teaching about the nature of the Kingdom of Heaven and the life of those who desire to be part of it
Nature of the Kingdom of Heaven and the life of those who desire to be part of it
The Sermon on the Mount presents an issue for some in that the standards and morality are set at extremely lofty heights.
Because Jesus outlines life in the Kingdom of Heaven in such challenging ways some scholars have suggested Christians are not to take these standards seriously:
Dispensationalism- If Israel had repented and accepted Jesus then what Jesus describes would have been established but since he was rejected the kingdom of heaven was postponed
The other end of the spectrum from not taking the Sermon on the Mount seriously in the life of Christians is the Social Gospel Movement.
The other end of the spectrum from not taking the Sermon on the Mount seriously in the life of Christians is the Social Gospel Movement.
a. The social gospel movement essentially sees the Sermon on the Mount as a kind of social roadmap to utopia. If we could just actualize Jesus’ teaching then a great multitude of social wrongs/ills could be made right.
The issue with the social gospel movement was pressing Jesus’ teachings/ethics upon those whom did not profess to follow Jesus.
Apart from the vine people could not be expected to live into the standards Jesus teaches.
The Sermon on the Mount is so extensive instead of trying to sprint through it all in one night I would like to anchor in one spot.
The beatitudes begin with “the kingdom of heaven” and end with the Kingdom of Heaven. (verses 3-10)
The beatitudes begin with “the kingdom of heaven” and end with the Kingdom of Heaven. (verses 3-10)
The Sermon on the Mount is so extensive instead of trying to sprint through it all in one night I would like to anchor in one spot.
God’s Kingdom will bring a new humanity
-It must be new/different as the standards in the opening verses are not as we experience in the old humanity.
QUESTION: Based on mankind’s sinful
Based on the old humanity the beatitudes may read as:
Blessed are the rich, for they have it all and have it all now.
Blessed are the happy, for they are content with themselves and don’t need others
Blessed are the arrogant, for people defer to them
Blessed are those who fight for the good things in life, for they will get them
Blessed are the sophisticated for they will have a good time
The Sermon on the Mount is so extensive instead of trying to sprint through it all in one night I would like to anchor in one spot.
The main body begins with verse 17 of chapter 5 and continues through verse 12 of chapter 7.
It is marked off by what scholars call an inclusio- which is a repetition of words that both begin and end a section providing a kind of verbal envelope for what comes in between.
The words “The Law and the Prophets” are the inclusio for this section
“abolish the Law”
“5:17. The Law or the Prophets was one way of referring to the entire Hebrew Scriptures (our Old Testament).
QUESTION: “In what sense did Jesus come not to abolish but to fulfill the Old Testament?
There is much debate over what Jesus meant by the word fulfill.
The word means “to fill out, expand.”
It does not mean to bring to an end.
Jesus was not taking away from the law, nor was he adding to it.
He was clarifying (filling out) its original meaning.
As a whole, the nation of Israel was limited in the thoroughness of its understanding of the Law.
This limited understanding was further warped and misguided by the perversions of the Pharisees and others who thought God’s Word needed “completion” through the oral tradition.
Jesus’ teaching here awakened his people to what the law meant from the beginning.
He clarified God’s longstanding desire that his creation be characterized by both internal (attitudes) and external (actions) obedience and holiness
Jesus himself fulfilled the law in several ways:
(1) by keeping it perfectly;
(2) by fulfilling the Old Testament messianic types and prophecies; and
(3) by providing the way of salvation that meets all the righteous requirements of the law.
5:18. Whenever Jesus began a statement with I tell you the truth it was a serious moment
Jesus overwhelmed the Pharisees’ charge that he was destroying the law.
“the law is both temporary ( ) and eternal ( 8:4)
“The least stroke (5:18) of the Hebrew alphabet is the yod.
Jesus was serious about the eternal quality of the Law
As teachers/learners we should never dismiss even the smallest part of scripture
5:19. Once again Jesus affirmed the law as it stood (properly interpreted),
But he began to shift his focus toward those who had changed its original meaning, while claiming to uphold it unchanged.
He identified the Pharisees for tampering with the law and their responsibility to teach others.
5:20. After stating that no one—not even the Messiah himself—was to change the law in any way, Jesus proclaimed the thesis for the remainder of the sermon
—unless your righteousness surpasses that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven.
This would have shocked Jesus’ listeners, because the scribes and Pharisees were considered the ultimate example of righteousness.
“To the Jewish listener, Jesus’ statement meant that no one could enter heaven.
To the average person trying to eke out a living, the Pharisees were the truly holy people.
Jesus claimed that even they were not good enough!
No amount of lawkeeping was good enough because the problem is the human heart.
Jesus went on to illustrate how bankrupt their understanding of the law was by making comparison after comparison
A careful examination of the remainder of the Sermon on the Mount reveals that virtually every point Jesus made draws a contrast between the pseudo-righteousness of the religious leaders and the true righteousness that God desires.
The person who discovers and appropriates true righteousness will:
Manifest the character qualities described in the Beatitudes (5:3–12)
And will impact the world as described in 5:13–16.
The Pharisees did neither.
Concluding Thoughts
Jesus drew attention to the gravity of his foundational premise with the formula, I tell you.
He equated himself with the author of Scripture which, of course, he was.
Jesus insisted his words bore all the authority of God himself which, of course, he was.
Jesus claimed deity for himself.
Jesus was essentially declaring war on the false pharisaical religion.
He insisted that no person could be saved by his or her own righteousness.
This was something the law intended to indicate all along, but Israel had missed the point (; ; ).
The point was hard for the self-righteous to swallow—no one, not even the super law-keeping Pharisees, could enter into heaven.
All needed a Savior!
“1. Jesus came to fulfill the law’s moral demands
“But while it is true that Jesus fulfilled the moral demands of God’s law, to understand “fulfill” in this way is out of place in this context. The issue in this paragraph is not how Jesus lived but what he was teaching.”
“2. Jesus completed the law’s inadequate teaching with his teaching.
“Some who understand that this verse is about the teachings of Jesus take it to mean that Jesus was fulfilling the law by completing it, that is, by adding to or rounding out what was already found in the Old Testament. The problem with this view is that Jesus seems to be doing the exact opposite in this paragraph, not for a moment suggesting anything about the incompleteness or inadequacy of the law but rather insisting on its perfection and abiding validity”
“3. Christ himself is the fulfillment of the law.
“The best explanation is that we should understand “fulfill” in the same sense it had earlier, when it was used of Old Testament prophecies that were fulfilled by Jesus’ coming
“This means that the Bible is about Jesus and that he is its fulfillment in all ways.
He fulfills:
The moral law by his obedience,
The prophecies by the specifics of life,
And the sacrificial system by his once-and-for-all atonement.
Jesus fulfills the Law and the Prophets in that they point to him, and he is their fulfillment.
The Authority of the Bible
“not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law
“not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law
Boice, J. M. (2001). The Gospel of Matthew (p. 81). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
The Measure of a Disciple
19 Anyone who breaks one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever practices and teaches these commands will be called great in the kingdom of heaven.
The important point is that the re-created person will actually live a moral life superior to that of the Pharisees.
“Regeneration is what Jesus was talking about when he told Nicodemus, “You must be born again” (). It is what Paul was writing about when he told the Ephesians, “God … made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions” (). On the basis of this distinction, Paul then speaks of two kinds of works, those we are capable of by ourselves (like the righteousness of the Pharisees) and those that are produced in us by the new life of Christ within.
Sin in the Heart (v 27-30)
Divorce (v 31-32)
Oaths (v 33-37)
Revenge (v 38-42)
Love Your Enemy (v 43-48)
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