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Genesis 3:11-13 It Ain't My Fault

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11 And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat? 12 And the man said, The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat. 13 And the LORD God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast done? And the woman said, The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.

11 He said, “Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten of the tree of which I commanded you not to eat?” 12 The man said, “The woman whom you gave to be with me, she gave me fruit of the tree, and I ate.” 13 Then the LORD God said to the woman, “What is this that you have done?” The woman said, “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.”

We have here the offenders found guilty by their own confession

yet endeavouring to excuse and extenuate their fault

They could not confess and justify what they had done

Though God knows all our sins, yet he will know them from us

requires from us an ingenuous confession of them

Who told you that you were naked?

God asks not because He lacks information

but to elicit a confession

That God appears so soon after the transgression suggests that He already knew what happened

at the time he actually thought more of his nakedness and shame than of his transgression of the divine command

his consciousness of the effects of his sin was keener than his sense of the sin itself

To awaken the latter God said

Who told you that you were naked

Have you eaten of the tree of which I commanded you not to eat?

God reminds him of the command he had given him

Sin appears most plain and most sinful in the glass of the commandment

The man said, “The woman whom you gave to be with me, she gave me fruit of the tree, and I ate.

Adam tries to pass responsibility to his wife—and perhaps even to God

He could not deny that he had, but sought to excuse himself by saying

that the woman whom God gave to be with him had given him of the tree

As the woman had been given him for his companion and help

he blames his spouse and God

Adam refuses to admit that even complicity is a way of being involved in wrongdoing

The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

“I only took what she gave me!”

there could be no exoneration for his crime on this flimsy basis

13 Then the LORD God said to the woman, “What is this that you have done?

there could be no exoneration for his crime on this flimsy basis
there could be no exoneration for his crime on this flimsy basis
The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

Adam charges that the Lord “gave” the woman to him

The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

and in turn she “gave” him the fruit

Mathews, K. A. (1996). (Vol. 1A, p. 241). Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publi
The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

The implication is inescapable

The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

God ultimately is responsible for the success of the tempter and Adam’s demise

When the woman was questioned, she pleaded as her excuse, that the serpent had beguiled her

Eve is not any better than her husband

She, too, looks for a scapegoat

The woman said, “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.”

Just as Adam tries to pass the blame to Eve, now Eve blames the serpent

cajoled by flattering lies

The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

unlike the man she can rightly claim to be the “victim” of deception

The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

Also she stops short of attributing the snake’s wily deed to God as Adam has insinuated

In offering these excuses, neither of them denied the fact

What Adam and Eve have in common is their refusal to accept personal responsibility for their actions.

But the fault in both was, that they did not at once smite upon their breasts

“It is so still; the sinner first of all endeavours to throw the blame upon others as tempters

and then upon circumstances which God has ordained

This sin of the first pair was heinous and aggravated

it was not simply eating an apple

ingratitude to a benefactor

disobedience to the best of Masters

a preference of the creature to the Creator

The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

The result is that the authority of God has been successfully undermined

The New American Commentary: Genesis 1–11:26 (3) God Questions the Man and Woman (3:9–13)

first through trickery and then through willful rebellion

In eating forbidden fruit, we have offended a great and gracious God

violated a sacred and most solemn covenant

and wronged our own precious souls by forfeiting God’s favour and exposing ourselves to his wrath and curse

though he is the tempter, we are the sinners

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