Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

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Do you believe yourself to be wise?
And if so, where does your wisdom come from?
Were not the situation so grievous, one could almost imagine a smile of incredulity on Paul’s face as he wrote these words and urged the Corinthians to survey their own congregation.
From a human viewpoint wisdom, influence, and high breeding were apparently in short supply.
If God had chosen on the basis of such criteria, He would have passed them by.
But when God called, he turned the world’s standards upside down and usually chose the ordinary rather than the outstanding in order that no one may boast before Him (v.
29) but only in the Lord.
For Christ alone personified the wisdom from God (v.
30) and in Him the Corinthians experienced righteousness, that is, justification (Rom.
4:24–25), holiness, that is, sanctification (2 Thes.
2:13–15), and redemption, that is, glorification (Rom.
8:23; Eph.
4:30).
In the wisdom of God the plan of salvation was accomplished by a crucified Christ hidden from the wise and learned but revealed to simple believers (cf.
Matt.
11:25–26).
God doesn't call the qualified, He qualifies the called.
Paul gave the rationale for the makeup of God’s people, here in 1 Cor.
1:26-28.
Because the Lord’s people embrace the “nothing” message, the world views them as nothing.
But in the next age God will shame the wise and the strong and bring to nothing the things that in this age are viewed as something (2:6; 3:18–20).
The Greek noun sophia means wisdom, intelligence, or knowledge, but this intelligence and knowledge pertain more to skill in living than to intellectual mastery.
In the OT, wisdom does not refer to intellectual ability but to one who looks to God for instruction.
Solomon stated that “the fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge” (Pr 1:7), which implies that even a genius who does not fear God is a fool (see Ps 14:1).
Paul understood sophia in the light of the OT.
He saw worldly wisdom and God’s wisdom as opposites (see 1Co 2:1–9; Col 2:23).
The Greeks depended on human mental prowess and insight to unravel the mysteries of life, but Paul relied on God’s revelation in Christ (1Co 1:30; Eph 1:8–9, 17; 3:8–12).
This is why Paul said that God’s wisdom in Christ is not “of this age” and “the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God” (1Co 2:6; 3:19).
The wisdom of God is foolishness to man, and the wisdom of men is foolishness to God.
Now why did God chose to do it this way, look again at v.29
God determined to choose despised ones—those who embrace the foolishness of the cross—so that no one can boast about his human accomplishment or position in his presence.
God receives the glory not men.
No one can boast in himself but only in God because apart from Christ one can do nothing.
By the Father’s doing, believers have an identification in Christ (in other words “in Christ crucified,”).
Because of this they possess the wisdom of God—Christ crucified, the very essence of wisdom.
Through this wisdom, believers have justification at God’s court, sanctification that allows their entrance into his presence, and ultimate redemption.
All of course - to the glory of God.
In Jer 8:3–9:26, the prophet issues several oracles of God’s judgment on those who lie, oppress people, and commit idolatry.
Those people who are wise in their own eyes will be put to shame (Jer 8:9; compare 1 Cor 1:21).
God’s people must not put their trust in their own wisdom, ability, or wealth.
The only safeguard is to boast in what God has done—in His accomplishments.
I started this message with two questions let me conclude with the same two questions.
Do you believe yourself to be wise?
And if so, where does your wisdom come from?
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