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Choses the Foolish to put to shame the Wise

But God  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  Presented   •  40:53
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Do you believe yourself to be wise? And if so, where does your wisdom come from?
1 Corinthians 1:26–31 NKJV
26 For you see your calling, brethren, that not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called. 27 But God has chosen the foolish things of the world to put to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to put to shame the things which are mighty; 28 and the base things of the world and the things which are despised God has chosen, and the things which are not, to bring to nothing the things that are, 29 that no flesh should glory in His presence. 30 But of Him you are in Christ Jesus, who became for us wisdom from God—and righteousness and sanctification and redemption— 31 that, as it is written, “He who glories, let him glory in the Lord.”
Were not the situation so grievous, one could almost imagine a smile of incredulity on Paul’s face as he wrote these words and urged the Corinthians to survey their own congregation. From a human viewpoint wisdom, influence, and high breeding were apparently in short supply. If God had chosen on the basis of such criteria, He would have passed them by. But when God called, he turned the world’s standards upside down and usually chose the ordinary rather than the outstanding in order that no one may boast before Him (v. 29) but only in the Lord.
For Christ alone personified the wisdom from God (v. 30) and in Him the Corinthians experienced righteousness, that is, justification (Rom. 4:24–25), holiness, that is, sanctification (2 Thes. 2:13–15), and redemption, that is, glorification (Rom. 8:23; Eph. 4:30).
In the wisdom of God the plan of salvation was accomplished by a crucified Christ hidden from the wise and learned but revealed to simple believers (cf. Matt. 11:25–26).
Matthew 11:25–26 NKJV
25 At that time Jesus answered and said, “I thank You, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that You have hidden these things from the wise and prudent and have revealed them to babes. 26 Even so, Father, for so it seemed good in Your sight.
God doesn't call the qualified, He qualifies the called.
Paul gave the rationale for the makeup of God’s people, here in 1 Cor. 1:26-28. Because the Lord’s people embrace the “nothing” message, the world views them as nothing. But in the next age God will shame the wise and the strong and bring to nothing the things that in this age are viewed as something (2:6; 3:18–20).
1 Corinthians 2:6 NKJV
6 However, we speak wisdom among those who are mature, yet not the wisdom of this age, nor of the rulers of this age, who are coming to nothing.
The Greek noun sophia means wisdom, intelligence, or knowledge, but this intelligence and knowledge pertain more to skill in living than to intellectual mastery.
In the OT, wisdom does not refer to intellectual ability but to one who looks to God for instruction. Solomon stated that “the fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge” (Pr 1:7), which implies that even a genius who does not fear God is a fool (see Ps 14:1).
Psalm 14:1 NKJV
1 The fool has said in his heart, “There is no God.” They are corrupt, They have done abominable works, There is none who does good.
Paul understood sophia in the light of the OT. He saw worldly wisdom and God’s wisdom as opposites (see 1Co 2:1–9; Col 2:23). The Greeks depended on human mental prowess and insight to unravel the mysteries of life, but Paul relied on God’s revelation in Christ (1Co 1:30; Eph 1:8–9, 17; 3:8–12). This is why Paul said that God’s wisdom in Christ is not “of this age” and “the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God” (1Co 2:6; 3:19).
1 Corinthians 3:18–20 NKJV
18 Let no one deceive himself. If anyone among you seems to be wise in this age, let him become a fool that he may become wise. 19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, “He catches the wise in their own craftiness”; 20 and again, “The Lord knows the thoughts of the wise, that they are futile.”
The wisdom of God is foolishness to man, and the wisdom of men is foolishness to God. Now why did God chose to do it this way, look again at v.29
1 Corinthians 1:29 NKJV
29 that no flesh should glory in His presence.
God determined to choose despised ones—those who embrace the foolishness of the cross—so that no one can boast about his human accomplishment or position in his presence.
God receives the glory not men. No one can boast in himself but only in God because apart from Christ one can do nothing.
1 Corinthians 1:30 NKJV
30 But of Him you are in Christ Jesus, who became for us wisdom from God—and righteousness and sanctification and redemption—
By the Father’s doing, believers have an identification in Christ (in other words “in Christ crucified,”). Because of this they possess the wisdom of God—Christ crucified, the very essence of wisdom. Through this wisdom, believers have justification at God’s court, sanctification that allows their entrance into his presence, and ultimate redemption.
All of course - to the glory of God.
1 Corinthians 1:31 NKJV
31 that, as it is written, “He who glories, let him glory in the Lord.”
In Jer 8:3–9:26, the prophet issues several oracles of God’s judgment on those who lie, oppress people, and commit idolatry. Those people who are wise in their own eyes will be put to shame (Jer 8:9; compare 1 Cor 1:21).
God’s people must not put their trust in their own wisdom, ability, or wealth. The only safeguard is to boast in what God has done—in His accomplishments.
I started this message with two questions let me conclude with the same two questions.
Do you believe yourself to be wise? And if so, where does your wisdom come from?
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