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Betraying Jesus

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Passover

Now the Feast of Unleavened Bread, which is called the Passover, was approaching.

NAS
The high point of the Feast of Unleavened Bread is Passover, the annual celebration of the death angel passing over blood-applied homes of Israelites when they were in Egypt. Passover involves a meal of which the centerpiece is the source of the blood that was applied to their doorposts, the Passover Lamb. However, none of the Gospels mention the preparation or eating of the lamb in connection to the last supper of Jesus and the Twelve. Some scholars speculate that Jesus himself presented himself as the Lamb because he gave them the bread to eat and told the disciples that it was his body that was given. “This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.” [New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (La Habra, CA: The Lockman Foundation, 1995), .]
New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (La Habra, CA: The Lockman Foundation, 1995), .
The Lexham Bible Dictionary Feast of Unleavened Bread

The Feast of Unleavened Bread was a week-long remembrance that consecrated the coming season. It may be considered an extension of the Passover feast rather than an independent holiday. The biblical texts intertwine the two feasts, with the Passover celebrated on the first day of the feast—the 14th of Abib—and the Feast of Unleavened Bread celebrated on the following day (Exod 13:3–10; Lev 23:4–8). The Feast of Unleavened Bread continued for seven days and required daily offerings. The feast demanded a rejection of leavened bread from the Israelites’ meals, households, and storage places (Deut 16:4). It concluded with a convocation and rest from laborious activity (Lev 23:8).

Preparation for Passover involved travel to Jerusalem and ritual purification before the feast. (John 11:55)

The chief priests and the scribes were seeking how they might put Him to death; for they were afraid of the people.

When Jesus had finished all these words, He said to His disciples,

2 “You know that after two days the Passover is coming, and the Son of Man is to be handed over for crucifixion.”

3 Then the chief priests and the elders of the people were gathered together in the court of the high priest, named Caiaphas;

4 and they plotted together to seize Jesus by stealth and kill Him.

5 But they were saying, “Not during the festival, otherwise a riot might occur among the people.”

Chief priests ἀρχιερεύς (one of whom was responsible to take the sacrificial blood into the Holy of Holies on the Day of Atonement to sprinkle it upon the Mercy Seat of the Ark of the Covenant which was inside the Holy of Holies) and scribes (experts in Jewish law),
When Jesus had finished all these words, He said to His disciples,
2 “You know that after two days the Passover is coming, and the Son of Man is to be handed over for crucifixion.”
3 Then the chief priests and the elders of the people were gathered together in the court of the high priest, named Caiaphas;
4 and they plotted together to seize Jesus by stealth and kill Him.
…the religious leadership, took initiative to find justification for the execution of Jesus.
5 But they were saying, “Not during the festival, otherwise a riot might occur among the people.”
Judas provided the opportunity through the weakness of his avarice, greed.

1 Jesus, therefore, six days before the Passover, came to Bethany where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised from the dead.

2 So they made Him a supper there, and Martha was serving; but Lazarus was one of those reclining at the table with Him.

3 Mary then took a pound of very costly perfume of pure nard, and anointed the feet of Jesus and wiped His feet with her hair; and the house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume.

4 But Judas Iscariot, one of His disciples, who was intending to betray Him, *said,

5 “Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii and given to poor people?”

6 Now he said this, not because he was concerned about the poor, but because he was a thief, and as he had the money box, he used to pilfer what was put into it.

7 Therefore Jesus said, “Let her alone, so that she may keep it for the day of My burial.

8 “For you always have the poor with you, but you do not always have Me.”

New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (La Habra, CA: The Lockman Foundation, 1995), Mt 26:1–5. and scribes (experts in Jewish law)
Judas Iscariot had been trusted by Jesus.
But then, Judas helped himself. (ESV)
Then, Judas entertained the devil’s plan for betrayal.

During supper, the devil having already put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon, to betray Him,

3 And Satan entered into Judas who was called Iscariot, belonging to the number of the twelve.

4 And he went away and discussed with the chief priests and officers how he might betray Him to them.

5 They were glad and agreed to give him money.

6 So he consented, and began seeking a good opportunity to betray Him to them apart from the crowd.

And Satan entered into Judas who was called Iscariot, belonging to the number of the twelve.

4 And he went away and discussed with the chief priests and officers how he might betray Him to them.

During supper, when the devil had already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray him

Then, Judas opened up completely for Satan to enter him.

Jesus then *answered, “That is the one for whom I shall dip the morsel and give it to him.” So when He had dipped the morsel, He *took and *gave it to Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot.

27 After the morsel, Satan then entered into him. Therefore Jesus *said to him, “What you do, do quickly.”

Even my close friend in whom I trusted,

Who ate my bread,

Has lifted up his heel against me.

26 Jesus answered, “It is he to whom I will give this morsel of bread when I have dipped it.” So when he had dipped the morsel, he gave it to Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot. 27 Then after he had taken the morsel, Satan entered into him.

The devil looks for opportunities.

and do not give the devil an opportunity.

27 and give no opportunity to the devil.

The devil seeks someone to devour.

8 Be of sober spirit, be on the alert. Your adversary, the devil, prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

9 aBut resist him, firm in your faith, knowing that the same experiences of suffering are being accomplished by your brethren who are in the world.

8 Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. 9 Resist him, firm in your faith, knowing that the same kinds of suffering are being experienced by your brotherhood throughout the world.

The devil can be resisted.
The devil can be resisted.

Submit therefore to God. Resist the devil and he will flee from you.

Submit yourselves therefore to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you.

Sovereignty vs. Free Will

Both are true
God is sovereign.
Judas is responsible for his decisions and actions.
For me, this passage () demonstrates God’s sovereign authority to govern us without over-riding human freedom and accountability.
In Judas’ instance, the entrance of Satan appears to be part of a greater plan to fulfill the need for Jesus to die upon the cross. Neither the foreknowledge of God nor the presence of Satan, relieve Judas of the responsibility for his own decisions and actions.
God is sovereign.
Judas is responsible for his decisions and actions.
In Judas’ instance, the entrance of Satan appears to be part of a greater plan to fulfill the need for Jesus to die upon the cross. Neither the foreknowledge of God nor the presence of Satan, relieve Judas of the responsibility for his own decisions and actions.
Clerow “Flip” Wilson Jr., the American comedian and television host from the 1970s, as Geraldine Jones said, “The devil made me do it.” as if Geraldine was not accountable for her choices and behaviors. “The devil made me buy this dress.”
Judas
In , we saw were told that, when Christ is the permanent resident upon the throne of your heart-palace, no devil can enter.

Praise

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 2455 Ἰούδας, Ἰωδά

Ἰούδας

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 3063 יְהוּדָה

יְהוּדָה [Yâhuwdah /yeh·hoo·daw/]

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 3063 יְהוּדָה

יְהוּדָה

יְהוּדָה

[Yâhuwdah /yeh·hoo·daw/]
1 the son of Jacob by Leah.
1 the son of Jacob by Leah. 2 the tribe descended from Judah the son of Jacob. 3 the territory occupied by the tribe of Judah. 4 the kingdom comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin which occupied the southern part of Canaan after the nation split upon the death of Solomon. 5 a Levite in Ezra’s time. 6 an overseer of Jerusalem in the time of a Levite musician in the time of a priest in the time of Nehemiah. Additional Information: Judah = “praised”.
2 the tribe descended from Judah the son of Jacob.
Judah = “praised”
3 the territory occupied by the tribe of Judah.
4 the kingdom comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin which occupied the southern part of Canaan after the nation split upon the death of Solomon.
5 a Levite in Ezra’s time.
6 an overseer of Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah.
7 a Levite musician in the time of Nehemiah.
8 a priest in the time of Nehemiah.
Additional Information: Judah = “praised”.

give thanks, laud, praise;

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 3063 יְהוּדָה

Yâhuwdah

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 3063 יְהוּדָה

יְהוּדָה [Yâhuwdah /yeh·hoo·daw/]

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 3063 יְהוּדָה

1 the son of Jacob by Leah. 2 the tribe descended from Judah the son of Jacob. 3 the territory occupied by the tribe of Judah. 4 the kingdom comprised of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin which occupied the southern part of Canaan after the nation split upon the death of Solomon. 5 a Levite in Ezra’s time. 6 an overseer of Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah. 7 a Levite musician in the time of Nehemiah. 8 a priest in the time of Nehemiah. Additional Information: Judah = “praised”.

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 2455 Ἰούδας, Ἰωδά

1 the fourth son of Jacob. 2 an unknown ancestor of Christ. 3 a man surnamed the Galilean, who at the time of the census of Quirinus, excited the revolt in Galilee, Acts 5:37. 4 a certain Jew of Damascus, Acts 9:11. 5 a prophet surnamed Barsabas, of the church at Jerusalem, Acts 15:22,27,32. 6 the apostle, Jn 14:22, who was surnamed Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus, and according to opinion wrote the Epistle of Jude. 7 the half-brother of Jesus, Mt. 13:55. 8 Judas Iscariot, the apostle who betrayed Jesus. Additional Information: Judah or Judas = “he shall be praised”.

Ἰούδας, Ἰωδά

Of Hebrew origin
Of Hebrew origin
1 the fourth son of Jacob.
2 an unknown ancestor of Christ.
3 a man surnamed the Galilean, who at the time of the census of Quirinus, excited the revolt in Galilee, .
4 a certain Jew of Damascus, .
5 a prophet surnamed Barsabas, of the church at Jerusalem, ,,.
6 the apostle, , who was surnamed Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus, and according to opinion wrote the Epistle of Jude.
7 the half-brother of Jesus, .
8 Judas Iscariot, the apostle who betrayed Jesus.
Additional Information: Judah or Judas = “he shall be praised”.
Also: Judas Maccabees “hammerer”
Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 2469 Ἰσκαριώθ, Ἰσκαριώτης, Σκαριώθ, Σκαριώτης

Ἰσκαριώθ, Ἰσκαριώτης, Σκαριώθ, Σκαριώτης [Iskariotes /is·kar·ee·o·tace/] n pr m. Of Hebrew origin probably 377 and 7149; GK 2696 and 2697 and 5000 and 5001; 11 occurrences; AV translates as “Iscariot” 11 times. 1 the apostle who betrayed Jesus. Additional Information: Iscariot = “men of Kerioth”.

Ἰσκαριώτης

[Iskariotes /is·kar·ee·o·tace/]
Of Hebrew origin
1 the apostle who betrayed Jesus.
Additional Information: Iscariot = “men of Kerioth”.
Judas was the son of Simon Iscariot
Kerioth was a Judean town

14 Then one of the twelve, named Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests

15 and said, “What are you willing to give me to abetray Him to you?” And they weighed out thirty pieces of silver to him.

16 From then on he began looking for a good opportunity to betray Jesus.

30 pieces of silver was a) the redemption price of a slave as shown in ; or the price of contempt as it was thrown back, see ; or 7 weeks pay for a Roman soldier
Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 694 ἀργύριον

ἀργύριον

Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon 694 ἀργύριον

ἀργύριον

30 pieces of silver was a) the redemption price of a slave as shown in ; or the price of contempt as it was thrown back, see ; or 7 weeks pay for a Roman soldier

ἀργύριον

Thirty pieces of silver was a) the redemption price of a slave as shown in ; or the price of contempt as it was thrown back, see ; or 7 weeks pay for a Roman soldier.
Silver coins used in 33 AD: a) Tyrian shekel or tetradrachma, b) Staten of Antioch tetradrachma, c) Ptolemaic Tetradrachma, d) Roman denarii. Roman denarii were used to pay Temple Tax, and had the highest value with 94% silver content, that is 14 grams of silver (14x30 = 420 grams which would be worth $205.39 in 2019).
Roman soldiers were paid $225 denarii/year. Modern military pay is $22,630-$25,510/year for E3 (Pvt 1st Class). Seven weeks would be about $3,350.
Roman soldiers were paid $225 denarii/year. Modern military pay is $22,630-$25,510/year for E3 (Pvt 1st Class). Seven weeks would be about $3,350.
Argyria
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