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God All

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Intro:

AG:
TS: God once again appears to Abraham and reaffirms the covenant adding the sign of circumcision.
In doing so, He reveals more about Himself.
In , God introduces Himself as “I am God Almighty” El-Shadai. It had been 24 years since God Promised Abraham He would make his seed a great nation and 13 years since Sarah and Abraham gave up on God and Ishmael was born. At that point, Abraham was 99 years old and he and Sarah were well past the age of childbearing- So having a child was impossible.
RS:
Genesis 17:1 ESV
When Abram was ninety-nine years old the Lord appeared to Abram and said to him, “I am God Almighty; walk before me, and be blameless,
Genesis 17:1–14 ESV
When Abram was ninety-nine years old the Lord appeared to Abram and said to him, “I am God Almighty; walk before me, and be blameless, that I may make my covenant between me and you, and may multiply you greatly.” Then Abram fell on his face. And God said to him, “Behold, my covenant is with you, and you shall be the father of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be called Abram, but your name shall be Abraham, for I have made you the father of a multitude of nations. I will make you exceedingly fruitful, and I will make you into nations, and kings shall come from you. And I will establish my covenant between me and you and your offspring after you throughout their generations for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you. And I will give to you and to your offspring after you the land of your sojournings, all the land of Canaan, for an everlasting possession, and I will be their God.” And God said to Abraham, “As for you, you shall keep my covenant, you and your offspring after you throughout their generations. This is my covenant, which you shall keep, between me and you and your offspring after you: Every male among you shall be circumcised. You shall be circumcised in the flesh of your foreskins, and it shall be a sign of the covenant between me and you. He who is eight days old among you shall be circumcised. Every male throughout your generations, whether born in your house or bought with your money from any foreigner who is not of your offspring, both he who is born in your house and he who is bought with your money, shall surely be circumcised. So shall my covenant be in your flesh an everlasting covenant. Any uncircumcised male who is not circumcised in the flesh of his foreskin shall be cut off from his people; he has broken my covenant.”
Genesis 1:1–14 ESV
In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day. And God said, “Let there be an expanse in the midst of the waters, and let it separate the waters from the waters.” And God made the expanse and separated the waters that were under the expanse from the waters that were above the expanse. And it was so. And God called the expanse Heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, the second day. And God said, “Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear.” And it was so. God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good. And God said, “Let the earth sprout vegetation, plants yielding seed, and fruit trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind, on the earth.” And it was so. The earth brought forth vegetation, plants yielding seed according to their own kinds, and trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And there was evening and there was morning, the third day. And God said, “Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night. And let them be for signs and for seasons, and for days and years,
Gen 17:
Genesis 17:1–5 ESV
When Abram was ninety-nine years old the Lord appeared to Abram and said to him, “I am God Almighty; walk before me, and be blameless, that I may make my covenant between me and you, and may multiply you greatly.” Then Abram fell on his face. And God said to him, “Behold, my covenant is with you, and you shall be the father of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be called Abram, but your name shall be Abraham, for I have made you the father of a multitude of nations.
The name El Shaddai tells us…
The name El Shaddai tells us…

1. That God is all-powerful.

El Shaddai is translated Almighty God or God Almighty.
It means, the God who can do anything. We know the name Elohim (God) means He is the almighty Creator of the universe; but there is a new dimension in knowing God by the name Shaddai.
Shaddai has been given 2 meanings by scholars. Some scholars believe the word literally means “mountain”- So they interpret the name Shaddai as suggesting strength, stability, and permanence.
God intentionally let Abraham and Sarah pass childbearing age before fulfilling His Promise for a very important reason-
God wanted to reveal to Abraham and Sarah that He was not only the all-powerful God who created the universe but also the all-powerful, life-giving God who could give them a child.
They had to learn to quit trusting in themselves and learn to trust in God who can do anything.
After revealing Himself to Abraham for the 1st time as El Shaddai, God promised to greatly increase Abraham’s descendants.
At that point Abraham fell on his face.
Through the name El Shaddai God was revealing to Abraham that His covenant with him was not canceled even though at times, Abraham had lapses of faith,
such as getting out of God’s will and going into Egypt, where he lied about Sarah being his sister.
After that, Abraham gave up on God and had a son by Sarah’s servant Hagar, resulting in the birth of Ishmael.
From time to time, all of us have lapses of faith. I know I do; but even then, we must remember that our God is El Shaddai.
This name reminds us that our all-powerful God can keep His promises even when we don’t hold up our end.
That is why we can trust Him to keep us saved.
The name El Shaddai tells us…

2. That God is all-sufficient.

The name El Shaddai also reveals God as the all-sufficient God.
The name El Shaddai is used several times in the Book of Genesis.
1st used when referring to the promise made with Abraham.
2nd time we find it is when Abraham’s son Isaac sends his son Jacob to take a wife from the daughters of his mother’s brother.
Isaac did this to prevent Jacob from marrying a Canaanite. As Jacob left to take a wife so that the promise would be fulfilled, Isaac told Jacob that he wanted God to bless him and multiply the size of his family.
3rd time in the Book of Genesis when God changed Jacob’s name to Israel.
This new name given to Jacob means “having power with God”.
4th 1st time Jacob ever used the name El Shaddai he was old in age and had to send his sons, including the youngest 1 Benjamin, back to Egypt to get food for his family during a severe famine.
He had refused to let Benjamin go on the 1st trip, during which they had unknowingly encountered Joseph, whom the brothers had secretly sold into slavery. Joseph demanded they return with their younger brother Benjamin. Jacob refused to let him go until his family faced starvation. Finally, when he came to the end of himself and faced the extinction of his family through famine, Jacob allowed Benjamin to go.
To paraphrase, Jacob finally confessed that God was all-powerful and whatever happened, God was in control and he would accept it.
Jacob had never called God El Shaddai before because he had always relied on his own scheming, deceit, and power to get what he wanted.
He had to reach the point in his life where he could not rely on his own power, but only that of El Shaddai.
Both Abraham and Jacob had to reach the place in their lives where they were willing to depend totally upon the life-sustaining power of God.
As long as we depend on our own skills, abilities, an intellect, we will never know the power of El Shaddai; but when we do completely depend upon God, we find that His grace is sufficient.
The name El Shaddai tells us…

3. That God walks with us.

God allows all of us to go through overwhelming experiences that look hopeless in order for us to experience His power to come to know Him as El Shaddai. In , the Lord reveals Himself to Abraham as El Shaddai and then gives him a command.
That command was to walk before God and live a blameless life.
The phrase walk before me means that we live in the knowledge that we are never out of God’s sight. The word blameless means without any outstanding fault. It doesn’t mean we are perfect, or sinless, but that we do nothing that could be used to injure our reputation or witness. It means to live so that there is no opportunity for private or public reproach.

Conclusion:

We will never come to know God as El Shaddai until we come to the end of ourselves. We must quit trusting in our own power and begin trusting in the power of God. Only when we come to know God as El Shaddai, will we begin to experience the power of God in our lives.
God only shows His power when we are willing to admit our weaknesses and inabilities. The 1st step is being willing to admit you don’t have the power to save yourself and to trust in Christ to completely, eternally save you form the penalty of your sins. Then, God says you must walk before Him and be blameless. That’s what is required if you want to experience the power of God in your life.
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