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yeargin How to Build Hope

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How to Build Hope
Paul knows something about hope and encouragement; here he is in the philippi jail writing about joy
Later on in his life Paul is in prison for being a Christian. He writes a letter to the church in Philippi. At this point she is 11 years of age. It’s been four years since he’s physically been to Philippi. The church in Philippi heard that Paul was suffering in prison. They were concerned about his health, so they generously took up an offering, gave money, and sent it to Paul with a man they trusted named Epaphroditus, a deacon in the church. On his way to be with Paul, Epahphrodites becomes ill, close to death. Not only is Philippi’s founding pastor close to death, now their deacon is, and they church is waiting to see how their leaders will respond to the suffering they are going through.
In his dirty jail cell, Paul responds. He sits down and writes to the Philippians to ease their anxieties. What a privilege that God would preserve this letter centuries later of a man who writes of joy in his suffering. He writes:
Question: what one thing would I want to have or have happen that would make my life easier and would bring me more happiness?

1) Surrender the Flesh (phil 3:1-7)

Lose to the flesh
what happens when you lose to the flesh, when you surrender the external desires and ambitions to whatever Christ would desire and give?
You Win Christ
External Hopes
Ritual - phil 3:5
Relationship- phil 3:5
Respectability- phil 3:5
Religion- phil 3:5
Paul walked away from Gamaliel
Paul walked away from prestige, Paul walked away from power, Paul walked away from stability
Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive II. Face Your Faults

Now, quit comparing yourself to other people. I’m going to tell you something, folks: There are people in this church who are smarter than you are. And there are people in this church who are richer than you are. And there are people in this church who are stronger than you are. But nobody can love Jesus better than you can. And you put it down: You can have all of Jesus you want. And I don’t know how much of Jesus you have; but you probably have just about all you want. And we need to just have a holy dissatisfaction. If you’re satisfied with your spiritual life right now, it’s simply because you’re aiming too low. You ought to be a growing Christian. You ought to be moving up one step higher.

Education- Suicide, Shame
Fame-
Success-
Wealth-
Good Looks-
Children-
Richly all things to enjoy
How do you know if you are crossing the line in placing your hope in something versus just being blessed by what God has given?
It has been said that you don’t solve money problems with money. How has that proven true in your life?
When is a time in your life when you realized you were holding on too tightly to something, and what did you do about it?
What are things that people place their hope in or hold onto that ultimately end up controlling them?
Why do you think Jesus was OK with Zacchaeus giving half of his money away, but asked the rich young ruler to give every penny away?
Matthew 26:39 KJV 1900
And he went a little further, and fell on his face, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt.

2) Suffer for the Faith (phil 3:8-11)

Suffer for the Lord
Gain fellowship and knowledge
now I know

There’s an old story that preachers love to tell about a social gathering. And there was an old man who preached the gospel for many, many years there, and there was a very famous orator, an actor, there. And somebody thought it would be a form of entertainment, I suppose, to hear from both of them. They said, “Let’s have both of them recite something for us.” The old preacher, who had preached for many, many years, was not learned; he was not educated, not eloquent, and not particularly gifted. And then there was this artist, this man who knew elocution. He knew acting. He’d been on the stage. He knew drama. He was well educated and very well trained. Somebody said, “Let’s ask them both to quote the Twenty-third Psalm.” So everybody thought that was a good idea.

And so, first of all, the actor quoted the Twenty-third Psalm. Oh, the expression! It was so magnificent. It was so beautiful. He knew exactly where to put the emphasis. Every word was perfect. And the people were just awestruck. And when he finished, they applauded. Then the old preacher stood up, and he quoted the Twenty-third Psalm entirely different. But he quoted those six magnificent verses. There was no applause, but there was not a dry eye in the place. And afterward somebody asked that actor, “You know, there was a dramatic difference between what you did and what the old preacher did. There was a difference. And you were both wonderful, but what was the difference?” The actor said, “I’ve thought about it, and I know what the difference is. I know the psalm; he knows the Shepherd.” Amen? That’s what we need to learn, friend. It’s not merely the Word of God, but the God of the Word.

This is a man—this is the Apostle Paul who was a grizzled old warrior now in prison getting ready to die, and he’s still talking about knowing the Lord Jesus Christ. And he doesn’t think that he has already attained. He’s not already perfect. He wants to know more and more about the Lord Jesus Christ. He wants that higher ground that Jim was leading us to sing about. So what we need to do very first of all is to fix our focus.

I think one of the great dangers that every seminary student faces and every Bible student faces is to have orthodoxy without the Holy Spirit—you can backslide with a Bible under your arm—to be Bible-taught and not to be Spirit-taught.

A) Paul was willing to suffer to know the Lord Personally ()

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive D. Paul Wanted to Know the Lord Preeminently

Meology has replaced theology. Now Paul said, “I want to know Him.” The whole point here is relationship is more important than accomplishment—relationship is more important than accomplishment.

A friend
Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive B. The Fellowship of Christ

I come to the garden alone

while the dew is still on the roses

And the voice I hear, falling on my ear,

The Son of God discloses.

And He walks with me, and He talks with me,

And He tells me I am His own,

and the joy we share as we tarry there,

None other has ever known.

B) Paul was willing to suffer to know the Lord powerfully ()

power in his testimony, victory over sin, over self and through Jesus Christ over satan

C) Paul was willing to suffer to know the Lord preeminently ()

im willing to die to see my saviour
Conform to his image
What are things that people place their hope in or hold onto that ultimately end up controlling them?
Why do you think Jesus was OK with Zacchaeus giving half of his money away, but asked the rich young ruler to give every penny away?
How does our suffering compel us to love Jesus more?
you’ve lost everyone and everything but Jesus and He is the true treasure in your life. Some have learned to love Jesus more because they realize that our God didn’t stay distant, but chose suffering and you love Him so much more because you and I would never choose to suffer for someone else in the way He did. Suffering for the Christian should never compel them to love Jesus less.
Can suffering purify our motives? How
If we are Christians, we are commanded to do all things for the glory of God. I would confess that everything I do is not for God’s glory, and it’s because my motives are mixed up a lot of the time. Even with the knowledge of Scripture, even with encouraging Christian friends, even with the Holy Spirit’s moral compass inside me, my motives can become selfish, lazy, prideful, idolatrous. In a word: impure.
Paul, beaten and alone in prison has no health, no wealth, no freedom. HE HAS NOTHING TO GAIN, and yet his motives are pure. He suffers for Jesus without complaining to God, doubting Him or accusing Him of being unreasonable.
How does suffering change or refocus our priority to follow Jesus daily?
How is hope during difficult times different for a Christian than it is for a person who does not know Christ?
When is a time you had peace during really difficult circumstances?
How do you go about controlling your mindset even when your world is falling apart?
When dealing with emotional pain, do you typically spew it, stuff it or share it? Why?
What is the best and worst way to respond to someone who is hurting?

3) Sanctify the Future (phil 3:12-14)

Forget the past (
To reach forth to the prize
Forgiveness
Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive V. Satan Binds You to the past; but Jesus Frees You for the Future

Satan Binds You to the Past; But Jesus Frees You for the Future

A) we need to forget past guilt

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive A. We Need to Forget past Guilt

What are things that we need to forget in our lives? Past guilt. If you will look in this same chapter, look in verse 6. Concerning zeal, persecuting the church, Paul knew the things that he had done—and they were terrible. But he refused to be haunted by the ghost of guilt. He buried those things in the grave of God’s forgetfulness.

B) we need to forget past glory

forget your past matches, this match in front of you is the only one that matters
“No man can serve two masters.” () Nobody can! Now He didn’t say you couldn’t have two jobs. He said, “No man can serve two masters,” because, you see, your master is the one who tells you exactly what to do, not part of the time, but all the time. That’s your master. You might have two bosses, but “no man can serve two masters.” Let me tell you what the Apostle James said. He said, “A double minded man is unstable in all his ways.” () Let me tell you what the Apostle Paul said. He said, “This one thing I do.” Let me tell you what a runner does. He puts his eye on the goal and with complete concentration looks at it. As he mentions here in verse 14, “I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.” It’s concentration.

C) we need to forget past grief

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive C. We Need to Forget past Grief

Paul talks about false brethren, people who had done him wrong; but he refused to be drinking the intoxicating cup of self-pity

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive C. We Need to Forget past Grief

You can have sickness and sorrow and financial reverse. Don’t sit around licking your wounds and drinking from that intoxicating cup. Paul said, “I forget that.”

D) we need to forget past grudges

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive III. Forget Your Failures

Now, what is the principle? The principle is you’re never a failure until you quit. Forget your failures. Forget those things that are behind. If there’s somebody here tonight who says, “Well, pastor, I am not the Christian I ought to be: woe is me,” well, all right, let’s put that in the grave of God’s forgetfulness then and forget those things which are behind. You’re never a failure until you quit.

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive IV. Firm up Your Faithfulness

Now, what is the principle here? The principle is that concentration is the secret of power—concentration is the secret of power.

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive IV. Firm up Your Faithfulness

These lights that are shining on us tonight, they’re defused. If they can concentrate enough, what do you have? A laser. It can burn through solid steel—concentrated light. When we were little boys—all little boys have done this—we would get a magnifying glass, go outside on a hot day, and do what? Set leaves on fire. It’s getting those beams of that magnifying glass focused just right. Or else we’d wait till we had one of our friends that wasn’t looking, and we’d put that on the back of his neck and watch him jump when it got hot enough. You see the guy that laughed? He’s done exactly that same thing.

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive IV. Firm up Your Faithfulness

“No man can serve two masters.” (Matthew 6:24) Nobody can! Now He didn’t say you couldn’t have two jobs. He said, “No man can serve two masters,” because, you see, your master is the one who tells you exactly what to do, not part of the time, but all the time. That’s your master. You might have two bosses, but “no man can serve two masters.” Let me tell you what the Apostle James said. He said, “A double minded man is unstable in all his ways.” (James 1:8) Let me tell you what the Apostle Paul said. He said, “This one thing I do.” Let me tell you what a runner does. He puts his eye on the goal and with complete concentration looks at it. As he mentions here in verse 14, “I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.” It’s concentration.

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive IV. Firm up Your Faithfulness

You say, “Well now, pastor, that brings up a real problem. I’ve got to do my job. I’ve got to have my rest. I think recreation is legitimate. I believe I ought to have friends.” And so do I. But listen to me very carefully now. Your job, your rest, your recreation, and your friends ought to help you toward this goal, or else they’re wrong for you. Did you know that’s the test of whether anything is right or wrong: whether or not it will help you to know Jesus? Any friend that makes it harder for you to love Jesus is not a true friend. Any job that you cannot do for the glory of God you have no business doing. Any vacation that you take that draws away your love for Jesus or dulls you is the wrong thing for you to do.

Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive IV. Firm up Your Faithfulness

I read what an Olympic runner said, and here’s what he said. Listen to it. This is really good. He said, “The only way to win a race is to forget all previous victories which would give you false pride and all former failures which would give you false fears. Each race is a new beginning. Pressing on to the finish tape is all that is important.” Is that not wonderful? You forget all past victories. That will give you false pride. Forget all past failures. That will give you false fear. And you put everything you’ve got into the race. That is, you keep your eye on that goal. You cannot run a race looking over your shoulder.

In Sunday School, talking about Lot’s wife and how she looked back and turned into a pillar of salt, a little boy said, “Well, that’s nothing. My mama was in the car, looked back, and turned into a telephone pole.”

You say, “Well, I was on the deacon fellowship; I’m finished with that now. I used to teach; I’m not going to teach any more. I used to be in the choir. It’s now time for me to rest a little bit. I used to tithe. Boy, I used to study the Bible. I used to. I used to.” Friend, you’re sick. Your voice may not make the sweet notes that Joyce’s could make tonight. Maybe you don’t have what it takes to serve in the deacon fellowship. Maybe your eyes won’t let you read that print in the Bible anymore like you used to. Maybe your mind is not as clear as it used to be. That’s fine. But I’m going to tell you something: You never stop running for Jesus. You never stop growing. You never stop going. You never stop glowing. You just keep on keeping on, and keep on keeping on. Here’s the Apostle Paul, and at the end of his life he says, “That I may know him.” (Philippians 3:10)

How does the way a child is nurtured and disciplined shape their view of God once they grow up?
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