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Reformed Baptist

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I. Introduction

Last week we learned about confessions and why we hold to them. We took a brief look the the 1689 London Baptist Confession. This week

II. What is a Reformed Baptist?

We are reformed in our worship
In our understanding of the Covenants
In our soteriology: The Doctrines of Grace
Confessional

III. Reformed Baptists and Worship

As reformed baptists, we worship God in very particular way. , , , (LBC 22:1,5)
How do we worship differently here than at other churches?
Confessional prayer.
Corporate prayer.
Extensive use of the Word of God, in reading, preaching, singing, praying.
Bible based preaching.
Singing in Psalms, hymns and spiritual songs.
Lord’s Supper and Baptism.
In short we do not seek to do anything that is not set out in scriptures in our worship. Some people call this the “Regulative Principle of Worship”.

IV. Reformed Baptists and Covenant Theology

As Reformed Baptist we believe that Adam represented all mankind in his sin, and Christ, in His works, represents all who live in Him . (LBC 7)
What is covenant theology?

A theological system dividing the history of redemption into separate periods (dispensations) in which God relates to his people in unique ways, first developed by Englishman John Nelson Darby (1800–1882) and primarily popularized in the United States through the Scofield Reference Bible. Dispensationalism differs from *covenant theology by identifying two separate peoples—Israel and the church—to whom God relates in distinct ways, thus introducing greater discontinuity into the biblical story than normally affirmed in the Reformed tradition.

Also known as federal theology, this form of *biblical theology focuses on the way God relates to his creatures through covenants—binding relationships between God and humanity involving mutual promises and responsibilities.

What is dipensationalism?

A theological system dividing the history of redemption into separate periods (dispensations) in which God relates to his people in unique ways, first developed by Englishman John Nelson Darby (1800–1882) and primarily popularized in the United States through the Scofield Reference Bible. Dispensationalism differs from *covenant theology by identifying two separate peoples—Israel and the church—to whom God relates in distinct ways, thus introducing greater discontinuity into the biblical story than normally affirmed in the Reformed tradition.

“Reformed Baptists agree with Reformed paedobaptists that God made a covenant of works with Adam, which he broke and so brought condemnation on the whole human race (). They also say that God mercifully made a covenant of grace with His elect people in Christ (), which is progressively revealed in the Old Testament and formally established in the new covenant at the death of Christ (). The only way anyone was saved under the old covenant was by virtue of this covenant of grace in Christ, such that there is only one gospel, or one saving promise, running through the Scriptures.
“Reformed Baptists agree with Reformed paedobaptists that God made a covenant of works with Adam, which he broke and so brought condemnation on the whole human race (). They also say that God mercifully made a covenant of grace with His elect people in Christ (), which is progressively revealed in the Old Testament and formally established in the new covenant at the death of Christ (). The only way anyone was saved under the old covenant was by virtue of this covenant of grace in Christ, such that there is only one gospel, or one saving promise, running through the Scriptures.
“Reformed Baptists agree with Reformed paedobaptists that God made a covenant of works with Adam, which he broke and so brought condemnation on the whole human race (). They also say that God mercifully made a covenant of grace with His elect people in Christ (), which is progressively revealed in the Old Testament and formally established in the new covenant at the death of Christ (). The only way anyone was saved under the old covenant was by virtue of this covenant of grace in Christ, such that there is only one gospel, or one saving promise, running through the Scriptures.
Baptist covenant theologians, however, believe they are more consistent than their paedobaptist brothers with respect to covenant theology’s own hermeneutic of New Testament priority. According to the New Testament, the Old Testament promise to “you and your seed” was ultimately made to Christ, the true seed (). Abraham’s physical children were a type of Christ, but Christ Himself is the reality. The physical descendants were included in the old covenant, not because they are all children of the promise, but because God was preserving the line of promise, until Christ, the true seed, came. Now that Christ has come, there is no longer any reason to preserve a physical line. Rather, only those who believe in Jesus are sons of Abraham, true Israelites, members of the new covenant, and the church of the Lord Jesus (). In both the Old and New Testaments, the “new covenant” is revealed to be a covenant of believers only, who are forgiven of their sins, and have God’s law written on their hearts ().
Baptists today who adhere to dispensationalism believe that the physical offspring of Abraham are the rightful recipients of the promises of God to Abraham’s seed. But they have departed from their historic Baptist roots and from the hermeneutical vision of the organic unity of the Bible cast by their forefathers. Baptist theologian James Leo Garrett correctly notes that dispensationalism is an “incursion” into Baptist theology, which only emerged in the last one hundred fifty years or so.” - Tom Hicks https://founders.org/2017/03/30/what-is-a-reformed-baptist/

V. Reformed Baptists and The Doctrines of Grace

Total Depravity (Total Inability) - (LBC 6:3-4, 9:3)
LBC 6, 9
We don’t mean that man is as evil as can be. Adolf Hitler could have been a lot more evil if God had not restrained him, and human laws in their own way curb the evil that men would act out. It means that man is completely depraved in that their is nothing they can do to remedy their situation.
Unconditional Election - ; (LBC 3:1,3,5)
LBC 3
This is a humbling thing. God choose us to be saved out of his own love and not because of anything good in us. In this way God is not a respecter of persons, but is completely free in his choosing.
Limited Atonement (Particular Redemption) - ; (LBC 8:4-5)
LBC 8
Really important doctrine because it forces us to ask: What did Christ’s death accomplish? Did it objectively save the people for whom did for or did it subjectively give people the opportunity to be saved?
Irresistible Grace (Effectual Calling) - ; (LBC 10:1-2)
LBC 10
Meaning that God effectually brings to pass the salvation of his people in time. He does this in a way that the personal is willing to turn to Christ, the person doesn’t come kicking a screaming to Christ. This is done through regeneration.
Perseverance of the Saints (Preservation of the Saints) - ; (LBC 17,18:1-2)
LBC 17,18

VI. Conclusion

Being a Reformed Baptist is more than we often think it is. It is viewing the whole Word of God as authoritative for our life, be this in our use of the confessions, our worship or the doctrines of Grace
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