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The Coronation of a King

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lass=MsoNormal align=right style='text-align:right'>1)  3-16-08…AM Palm Sunday…SBC“The Coronation of a King”

Matthew 21:1-11; Mark 11:1-11; Luke 19:28:38; John 12:12-19

Introduction:

Ø      Palm Sunday is the day in the church year when traditionally we mark the entrance of Jesus into Jerusalem for the last week of his life.

Ø      Matthew’s writing offers an apologetic (reasoning and proof) for the Messiaship of Jesus Christ

He constantly references:

1)      fulfillment of OT prophecies related to the Messiah (in our text it is Zechariah 9:9)

2)      emphasis on the genealogical rights to the throne of David

3)      the recording of numerous kingdom principles and teachings

4)      the assumption of the Jewish readers to understand the festival and traditions related to the Messiah

5)      I believe that all of this indicates an intention to persuade Jews that their Messiah had come

Ø      Matthew’s introduces to the Jews, Jesus as the fulfillment of God’s promise to David, and Israel as a nation

1)      at the same time he presents Jesus as the provision for the sins of the World

2)      Matthew illustrates how God, who sent His son, is the God of Israel and that He has not forgotten His covenants with His people and Jesus the Messiah is proof of that

 

Transition:       In our text this morning, Jesus is entering Jerusalem for the last time

·         this is Jesus’ final week on this earth

Ø      the Passover is the upcoming event for which this entire journey to Jerusalem is all about

·         from Mark 11:9 we see that a crowd had begun to follow Jesus on this 2 mile journey from Bethany

o        Bethphage (v. 1) and Bethany (v. 17) were two small villages just to the east of Jerusalem on or near the slopes of the large hill, known as the Mount of Olives, which dominated the skyline of that side of town.[1]

·         the celebration of deliverance from Egyptian bondage so long ago coupled with this Prophet who seems to hold the potential for relieving Israel of their current bondage has created quite an excitement on this journey to Jerusalem

Ø      This Triumphal Entry was an event of outstanding significance.[2]

1.                          By means of it Jesus deliberately evokes a demonstration. He fully realizes that, as a result, the enthusiasm of the masses will enrage the hostile leaders at Jerusalem, so that they will desire more than ever to carry out their plot against him.[3]

2.                          By means of this Triumphal Entry Jesus fulfils the Messianic prophecy of Zech. 9:9. When the people hail him as the Son of David, i.e., the Messiah, he does not try to restrain them.[4]

3.                          he also shows the crowds what kind of Messiah he is, the One who came to promote and establish “the things that make for peace” (Luke 19:42)… Accordingly, Jesus enters Jerusalem mounted on a colt, the foal of an ass, an animal associated not with the rigors of war but with the pursuits of peace, for he is the Prince of Peace (Isa. 9:6). [5]

We see first of all that this coronation began with…

1)   Preparation       v1-3                              (Points A-E come from MacArthur Commentary – see footnote 6)

 

A-    From this text and many others it is clear that Jesus was always in control of the events that affected His life.[6]

B-    He initiated His own coronation when He sent two disciples to procure the donkey on which He would ride into Jerusalem.

C-    Jesus set into motion a series of climactic events that culminated in the voluntary, gracious sacrifice of Himself on the cross that had been divinely planned from eternity past.

D-    Only in His omniscience could Jesus have known that the donkey and her colt would at that moment have been where they were, waiting to be found by the two disciples.

E-     Jesus also knew the disciples would be questioned about taking the animals. He therefore further instructed them

Transition:  Before Matthew even informs his readers how the two disciples fared, he marks this event as a fulfillment of …

2)   The Prophecy             v4-5

 

A-    Matthew explains that Jesus’ entire life and ministry were marked by two overriding purposes, to do His heavenly Father’s will (Matt. 26:39, 42; John 4:34; 5:30) and to fulfill the Old Testament prophecies of the Messiah’s first coming (Matt. 5:17; Luke 13:33; 24:25–27; Acts 3:21).[7]

B-    The Zechariah 9:9 Prophecy

1-      The daughter of Zion refers to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, which was sometimes referred to as Zion, because Mount Zion is the city’s highest and most prominent hill. [8]

2-      Zechariah, 500 years earlier, had predicted that the people of Jerusalem would hail the Messiah as their King as He was coming into the city and that He would be gentle, or humble, and mounted on a donkey, even on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden (see Zech. 9:9).[9]

3-      By the standards and purposes of the earth’s kings, Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem was anything but triumphant; but by the standards and purposes of God, it was exactly as it was meant to be.[10]

4-      This King is not the fulfillment of men’s dreams but of a specific Messianic prophecy (Zech. 9:9).  He is both great and humble, exalted and lowly. He is the One who in this very act is riding … to his death, and thus to victory, a victory not only for himself but also for his true people, those who believe in him.[11]

Ø      Everything happened exactly as Jesus had predicted.            v6

Transition:   To this omnisciently created scene was added…

 

3)   The Parade                 v6-11

 

A-    It was an ancient custom (2 Kings 9:13) for citizens to throw their garments in the road for their monarch to ride over, symbolizing their respect for him and their submission to his authority.[12]

B-    The whole picture conveys celebration and honor, reminiscent of the victory parades with which triumphant kings and generals in Old Testament times were welcomed (2 Kings 9:13)[13]

C-    The people cried Hosanna - transliterated from the Aramaic; strictly, a cry expressing an appeal for divine help            literally:  save us!   help, we pray![14]

1-      But the crowd on that day was not interested in Jesus’ saving their souls but only in His saving their nation.[15]

2-      Like the Twelve, they had long wondered why, if Jesus were truly the Messiah, He had not used His supernatural powers against the Romans.[16]

3-      The people wanted a conquering, reigning Messiah who would come in great military power to throw off the brutal yoke of Rome and establish a kingdom of justice and righteousness where God’s chosen people would have special favor.[17]

 

 

Conclusion:                 Why did Jesus come?

 

1-      He did not come to make war with Rome but to make peace with God for men.[18]

2-      The multitude knew who Jesus was, but they did not understand or truly believe what they knew.[19]

3-      The people wanted Jesus on their own terms, and they would not bow to a King who was not of their liking, even though He were the Son of God. [20]

4-      They wanted Jesus to destroy Rome but not their cherished sins or their hypocritical, superficial religion.[21]

 

Ø      Are you someone today who is open to a Jesus who you think will give you wealth, health, success, happiness, and the other worldly things they want?[22]

Ø      Are you like the multitude at the triumphal entry, who will loudly acclaim Jesus as long as He will satisfy their selfish desires and bring you what you want?[23]

Ø      But like the same multitude a few days later, will you reject and denounce Him when He does not deliver as you expected.[24]

Ø      When His Word confronts you with your sin and your need of a Savior, will you curse Him and turn away?[25]

To the Believer

  1. Christ died that you and I might live apart from eternal death and endless misery by being separated from God forever

  1. Being a Christian means being dead to sin and not being controlled by its dominating power

Do you love to obey this command of Romans 6:13? 

Do not present your members to sin as instruments for unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life, and your members to God as instruments for righteousness.[26]

How much of your new life is swayed by living according to God’s standard?

To the Unbeliever

  1. Christ is setting up the events of the cross in order to absorb the wrath of God on you!

 

-          the seriousness of an insult rises with the dignity of the one insulted

-          the Creator of the Universe is worthy of your respect and loyalty and your faith

-          failure to love God and surrender to Him is not trivial, it is high treason

-          failure to love defames God and destroys true human happiness

  1. God sent His son to die for you, to absorb the wrath that was intended for your sin                       Romans 3:25

-          Propitiation:  The removal of God’s wrath by providing a substitute

-          Jesus Christ was your substitute

-          It was Jesus who not only cancelled your wrath, but he absorbed it, he diverted it from you to Himself

  1. Do not trifle with God or trivialize His love for you

-          you will never appreciate God’s love for you until you realize the seriousness of your sin and the fairness of His wrath against you

1 John 4:10 In this is love, not that we have loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the [wrath-absorbing] propitiation for our sins.[27]

Why did He come?    He came for you!

 

Will you accept Him as King of your life for the salvation of your soul today?


----

[1]Craig Blomberg, vol. 22, Matthew, electronic ed., Logos Library System; The New American Commentary (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2001, c1992), 311.

[2]William Hendriksen and Simon J. Kistemaker, vol. 9, New Testament Commentary : Exposition of the Gospel According to Matthew, Accompanying Biblical Text Is Author's Translation., New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1953-2001), 760.

[3]William Hendriksen and Simon J. Kistemaker, vol. 9, New Testament Commentary : Exposition of the Gospel According to Matthew, Accompanying Biblical Text Is Author's Translation., New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1953-2001), 760.

[4]William Hendriksen and Simon J. Kistemaker, vol. 9, New Testament Commentary : Exposition of the Gospel According to Matthew, Accompanying Biblical Text Is Author's Translation., New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1953-2001), 760.

[5]William Hendriksen and Simon J. Kistemaker, vol. 9, New Testament Commentary : Exposition of the Gospel According to Matthew, Accompanying Biblical Text Is Author's Translation., New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1953-2001), 760.

[6]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 260.

[7]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 260.

[8]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 260.

[9]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 260.

[10]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 260.

[11]William Hendriksen and Simon J. Kistemaker, vol. 9, New Testament Commentary : Exposition of the Gospel According to Matthew, Accompanying Biblical Text Is Author's Translation., New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1953-2001), 765.

[12]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[13]Craig Blomberg, vol. 22, Matthew, electronic ed., Logos Library System; The New American Commentary (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2001, c1992), 313.

[14]Timothy Friberg, Barbara Friberg and Neva F. Miller, vol. 4, Analytical Lexicon of the Greek New Testament, Baker's Greek New Testament library (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books, 2000), 416.

[15]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[16]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[17]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[18]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[19]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[20]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[21]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[22]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[23]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[24]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[25]John MacArthur, Matthew (Chicago: Moody Press, 1989), 263.

[26]The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2001), Ro 6:13.

[27]The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2001), 1 Jn 4:10.

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