Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

Overall tone of the sermon

This automated analysis scores the text on the likely presence of emotional, language, and social tones. There are no right or wrong scores; this is just an indication of tones readers or listeners may pick up from the text.
A score of 0.5 or higher indicates the tone is likely present.
Emotion Tone
Anger
0.11UNLIKELY
Disgust
0.11UNLIKELY
Fear
0.52LIKELY
Joy
0.63LIKELY
Sadness
0.48UNLIKELY
Language Tone
Analytical
0.54LIKELY
Confident
0UNLIKELY
Tentative
0.3UNLIKELY
Social Tone
Openness
0.86LIKELY
Conscientiousness
0.9LIKELY
Extraversion
0.12UNLIKELY
Agreeableness
0.72LIKELY
Emotional Range
0.69LIKELY

Tone of specific sentences

Tones
Emotion
Anger
Disgust
Fear
Joy
Sadness
Language
Analytical
Confident
Tentative
Social Tendencies
Openness
Conscientiousness
Extraversion
Agreeableness
Emotional Range
Anger
< .5
.5 - .6
.6 - .7
.7 - .8
.8 - .9
> .9
For the choir director: “Do Not Destroy.”
A Davidic Miktam.
When he fled before Saul into the cave.
1 Be gracious to me, God, be gracious to me,
for I take refuge in You.
I will seek refuge in the shadow of Your wings
until danger passes.
2 I call to God Most High,
to God who fulfills His purpose for me.
3 He reaches down from heaven and saves me,
challenging the one who tramples me.
Selah
God sends His faithful love and truth.
4 I am surrounded by lions;
I lie down with those who devour men.
Their teeth are spears and arrows;
their tongues are sharp swords.
5 God, be exalted above the heavens;
let Your glory be over the whole earth.
6 They prepared a net for my steps;
I was despondent.
They dug a pit ahead of me,
but they fell into it!
Selah
7 My heart is confident, God, my heart is confident.
I will sing; I will sing praises.
8 Wake up, my soul!
Wake up, harp and lyre!
I will wake up the dawn.
9 I will praise You, Lord, among the peoples;
I will sing praises to You among the nations.
10 For Your faithful love is as high as the heavens;
Your faithfulness reaches the clouds.
11 God, be exalted above the heavens;
let Your glory be over the whole earth.
Intro
In this morning’s passage we read, not of a triumphant David, but one who is despondent.
As someone who is with very little hope.
Of someone who has low spirits.
David is on the run right now and it is not because he is a criminal, it is because Saul, in his paranoia, is seeking to kill David.
David has been wildly successful in battle, conquering all of the enemies of Israel for Saul and Saul fears David because he knows that God has left him and is on David.
And so in his jealousy and his anger, he attempts to kill David multiple times.
In chapter 18, the first attempt is interesting, because Saul promises Michal to be David’s wife if he will go and slay 200 Philistines and bring back proof of his accomplishment.
I’ll leave out the proof, but you can read it in ch 18.
He is hoping that the Philistines will rid him of his problem.
But that fails because David comes back, unharmed with the bride price.
Body
Saul gets a bit more anxious and in chapter 19, we learn that Saul has ordered his own son and the all his servants to kill David.
Jonathan intervenes on David’s behalf but then soon thereafter he hurls a javelin at David.
David goes on the run and just so you get a picture of how much running David does, here is a map of David’s travels.
It is during this time where David is on the run where we he composes this psalm.
Now there were two occasions for when he could have written this psalm, the first in , while hiding in the cave of Adullam after recovering the sword of Goliath.
The second in , which records the very well known incident of David cutting off a piece of Saul’s robe when he is… “relieving” himself in a cave, a cave where David just so happens to be hiding in.
The second occasion is more likely the event which inspired David to compose this lament and praise psalm.
Acutely aware of his need, David brings a suitable prayer.
He calls out to God for mercy while at the same time, displaying complete confidence in trust in God.
Body
He read of David crying out...
Psalm 57:7–11 HCSB
7 My heart is confident, God, my heart is confident.
I will sing; I will sing praises.
8 Wake up, my soul!
Wake up, harp and lyre!
I will wake up the dawn.
9 I will praise You, Lord, among the peoples;
I will sing praises to You among the nations.
10 For Your faithful love is as high as the heavens;
Your faithfulness reaches the clouds.
11 God, be exalted above the heavens;
let Your glory be over the whole earth.
David, in his time of despair, is shown as a righteous servant.
He trusts God to deliver him form those who were seeking to kill him.
It was not just Saul, they Philistines were also after David.
He describes himself as “surrounded by lions” (verse 4).
And if in fact David is writing this from the cave in the wilderness near Engedi, then it is odd that he is saying these things.
He could have ended Saul.
He could have killed Saul, he had several chances to do so, but he does not sin, he does not attempt to take matters into his own hands.
No, vengeance belongs to the Lord.
And God will be faithful to accomplish His promises and God had set up David to be king and David was not about to take it by force or on his timing.
David is shown to be a faithful servant to God.
But what does any of this have to do with Easter?
Easter is so significant, it is in fact what all of the Scriptures point to.
Easter is the climax of the Christian story, the assurance of eternal life with God.
Yet for many of us, all the joy and celebrations come to an end on Sunday, and by the time Monday rolls around, life goes back to how we left it.
INTRODUCTION Easter has been and always will be significant in the life of the Church, regardless of tradition or denomination.
Most who grew up in the faith probably hold memories of buying a new outfit, hunting eggs and eating a home-cooked meal with families and friends.
It’s always been a big deal, as it should be.
Easter is the climax of the Christian story, the assurance of eternal life with God.
Yet for many of us, all the joy and celebrations come to an end on Sunday, and by the time Monday rolls around, life goes back to how we left it.
And although, we are recognizing Easter today as a day, we do not just rejoice one day out of the year.
And just because we have church seasons…Easter season leading up to June 9th when the last church season of Pentecost begins…does not mean that we only recognize the resurrection of Christ for a few months.
No, our lives are centered around this very real event that has implications on how we understand God, our faith, and how we live our lives.
This is a significant event.
An event that brings us joy and hope.
INTRODUCTION Easter has been and always will be significant in the life of the Church, regardless of tradition or denomination.
Most who grew up in the faith probably hold memories of buying a new outfit, hunting eggs and eating a home-cooked meal with families and friends.
It’s always been a big deal, as it should be.
Easter is the climax of the Christian story, the assurance of eternal life with God.
Yet for many of us, all the joy and celebrations come to an end on Sunday, and by the time Monday rolls around, life goes back to how we left it.
Beginning with Easter Sunday, this season lasts seven weeks.
< .5
.5 - .6
.6 - .7
.7 - .8
.8 - .9
> .9