Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

Overall tone of the sermon

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Tone of specific sentences

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Anger
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Anger
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Introduction
[pray]
Father God in Heaven, we praise You and welcome You into our presence.
Our One Desire is that You may be glorified in this place today.
Father we ask that you forgive our sins against You and against Your Son.
Father please show us where we forsake you daily and lead us into repentance.
God I ask that you would give me clarity of mind, precision of speech, and a heart for your people who are gathered here today.
In the name of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, Amen.
When we think of Old Testament prophecy regarding the Messiah, Bible scholars turn first to .
But the song, written by the prophet Isaiah, actually starts at the end of .
So I’ve added a point to your outline.
This song is a beautiful tribute to the Messiah and it points directly at Jesus Christ and carries us to the Passion of the Christ at Mount Calvary.
The messianic interpretation of was held by Jewish rabbis till the twel
O.
He was a Shocking Servant -
This song references the “servant,” whom we interpret to be Jesus Christ.
We see several things that are surprising about the Messiah here:
His Exaltation
He is highly exalted (v 13), which was surprising to the Pharisees.
Even after His death, the Servant was lifted up very high (so says the text).
The Pharisees expected a humiliating defeat that would put an end to the rebel from Nazareth.
But God saw a great victory taking place.
He was raised from the dead.
He ascended into Heaven to sit at the right hand of His Father.
He was given great authority.
His Appearance
His appearance (v 14) at His crucifixion was surprising.
When the movie, The Passion of the Christ, came out it was given an R rating because of the bloody depictions of our Lord.
Many parents refrained from showing it to their young children, and rightly so, because of the graphic depictions of the bruised and bloodied Jesus Christ.
I won’t go into graphic detail of this account—even the Gospel writers could not go into great detail—but accounts say that Jesus didn’t even look human by the time they were done with Him on that Friday.
The people in the crowd could not even bear to look at Him.
His Message Left Kings Speechless
Paul interpreted this section to point to the gospel message:
And this gospel message was spread to the Gentiles (aka “they who had no news of him nor had heard”).
The word “sprinkle” here can refer a splash of water, but in some cases it can be translated as “startle” just like you get when you get a splash of water in the face.
The connection here is to the sprinkling of the blood, as we see when the blood of the sacrifice is sprinkled on the seat of atonement and sins are forgiven.
The word “sprinkle” here can refer a splash of water, but in some cases it can be translated as “startle” just like you get when you get a splash of water in the face.
The connection here is to the sprinkling of the blood, as we see when the blood of the sacrifice is sprinkled on the seat of atonement and sins are forgiven.
Since when is the servant considered prosperous?
When is the servant exalted and lifted up?
While Jesus startled princes and paupers alike, His message of forgiveness and free access to God is the most shocking message of all time.
I.
He was a Man of Sorrows -
It is interesting here that this chapter begins with the “arm of the Lord” (v 1) which indicates something powerful and mighty.
It immediately moves to the image of the tender shoot growing up in parched ground (v 2).
What more tenuous a position could you point to?
This is an image of humiliation and weakness.
It points to the humanity of Jesus.
God Used His Hand
God Used His Strong Arm
But in order to save a world full of lost sinners it took His mighty arm.
Yet sinners still refuse to believe
The Sorrowful Servant
As I said, the “servant” in this passage is Jesus, the long-awaited Messiah.
But why is He sorrowful?
How did people treat servants?
They despised Him and put a cheap price on His head.
They were waiting for a king, not a servant with no prestige or power.
They counted Him for little to nothing.
They rejected Him.
Certainly Jesus felt pain in His humanity.
Just like all of us, he felt physical pain and emotional pain.
Israel was both politically and spiritually dry ground when Jesus was born.
This tender “root of Jesse” came up in a dry and parched land that was far from God.
The Jewish people hoped for a Messiah that would assume the throne of David, son of Jesse.
And that will still come to pass.
Paul referred to this prophecy in when He pointed to Christ as the “root of Jesse.”
Jesus himself claims this title in ...
Romans 15:
Certainly the servant, Jesus, witnessed a lot of pain and heartache as His people lived under the oppression of the Roman empire, all while rejecting their God and their Messiah.
This certainly caused the Servant much sorrow.
Certainly the servant, Jesus, witnessed a lot of pain and heartache as His people lived under the oppression of the Roman empire, all while rejecting their God and their Messiah.
II.
He was Smitten of God - vv 4-6
Smitten of God
Smitten is not a word that we use often in today’s language, except perhaps in the context of love.
The word “smitten” is actually a derivative of the word smite (I know that helps, right?). “Smitten of God” means that He was struck down by God.
Why Would God Punish the Servant?
The passage makes it clear this this is because of our sin...
He was pierced for our transgressions, which is for our breaking of God’s laws.
He was crushed for our iniquities, which means that we stand guilty before God.
He was scourged, but it brought us healing—not physical healing but spiritual healing and righteousness in God’s eyes.
Because the servant died—Jesus died on the cross in the most horrible way imaginable—so that “the iniquity of us all [would] fall on Him”—that is to say “on the servant.”
III.
He was Silent Before His Oppressors - vv 7-9
John 1:29
III.
He was Silent Before His Oppressors - vv 7-9
This section focuses on Jesus’ silence before the court officials.
His Silence Before His Accusers
Jesus was not guilty.
He had no sin for which He was responsible.
The trial that Jesus endured was an illegal conviction.
He had no sin in Him and had done nothing wrong.
The religious leaders of His day turned to false witnesses and lies in order to convict Him and condemn Him to death.
But He never made an appeal or even an excuse for Himself.
Because He took our sin, He had no defense that could preserve Him from the torture that was to come.
When He was being arrested at the Garden of Gethsemane...
Like a Lamb to Slaughter
The phrase that refers to the sheep going silently
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