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The Power of His Presence

Breaking Bread with Barnabas  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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The power of the presence of Jesus: Brings light to your darkness (v. 17), sight to your blindness (v. 19), calm to your frightening (v. 20), deliverance from your storms (vv. 18, 21).

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Pre-Introduction:
Pre-Introduction:
At this time, we invite any children who desire to join my dear wife for a children’s service to follow her where you can hear a wonderful bible lesson and sing some uplifting songs about Jesus.
For those joining us online, you’re listening to the Services of the Broomfield Baptist Church. This is the Pastor bringing the Sunday Morning message entitled "The Power of His Presence.” We invite you to follow along with us in your Bible in the Book of John, chapter six, and verses sixteen to twenty-one.
For our guests and church family present here today, In about 35mins or so, I’m going to ask you to do something. I’ll be asking you to make a decision based on the information in today’s sermon. At the end of the service, I’ll invite you to come and kneel front as a sign of God working in your life.

Introduction:

[Start Low]
John 6:20 KJV 1900
But he saith unto them, It is I; be not afraid.
MANY a dark night has rested over this sea of Tiberias unrecorded. Many a storm has swept it; many an earthquake has convulsed it; many a wave has risen and fallen o’er its blue expanse; many a scene and hour of danger its steep hills have witnessed; all unrecorded; passing away in silence. But here is one night, of which record has been kept; one blast written down in history; one storm made memorable for ever. At what exact part of that lake the occurrence took place we know not; it must have been somewhere towards the north, where Capernaum lay. Let us read this brief record, and learn its everlasting lesson. [Horatius Bonar, Light and Truth: Or, Bible Thoughts and Themes, the Gospels (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1871), 299.]
MANY a dark night has rested over this sea of Tiberias unrecorded. Many a storm has swept it; many an earthquake has convulsed it; many a wave has risen and fallen o’er its blue expanse; many a scene and hour of danger its steep hills have witnessed; all unrecorded; passing away in silence. But here is one night, of which record has been kept; one blast written down in history; one storm made memorable for ever. At what exact part of that lake the occurrence took place we know not; it must have been somewhere towards the north, where Capernaum lay. Let us read this brief record, and learn its everlasting lesson. [Horatius Bonar, Light and Truth: Or, Bible Thoughts and Themes, the Gospels (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1871), 299.]
“Jesus is the ‘I am,’ the voice behind the unconsumed burning bush in , the one who walks across the stirring sea, who speaks on behalf of God in the first person. The presence of Jesus silences our fear and exposes our need to receive him in his fullness.” [ZECNT]
B. Raise Need-
Illustration-
C. State Purpose-
D. Orient Theme-
Main Thought: The power of the presence of Jesus: Brings light to your darkness (v. 17), Sight to your blindness (v. 19), Calm to your frightening (v. 20), Deliverance from your storms (vv. 18, 21)
Sub-introduction:
How does John show the full deity of Christ?
• By His titles. Jesus is called the Word (1:1), the Lamb of God (1:29), the Messiah 1:41), the Savior of the world (4:42), and Lord and God (20:28).
• By His claim to be the “I am,” or [Jehovah] of the Old Testament (8:58; 13:19), thus equating Himself with God.
• By His own statement in 10:30, where the word one in the neuter gender indicates that Jesus and God are one in nature. The reaction of the people clearly shows that they understood this to be a claim to be fully God.
• By the seven miracles John chose to use as signs or proofs that Jesus is God. They are: turning water to wine (2:1–11); curing the nobleman’s son (4:46–54); curing the paralytic (5:1–18); feeding the five thousand men (6:6–13); walking on water (6:16–21); giving sight to the blind man (9:1–7); raising Lazarus from death (11:1–45). [Charles Caldwell Ryrie, Ryrie’s Concise Guide to the Bible (San Bernardino, CA: Here’s Life Publishers, 1983), 124–125.]
Charles Caldwell Ryrie, Ryrie’s Concise Guide to the Bible (San Bernardino, CA: Here’s Life Publishers, 1983), 124–125.
Body:

I. Departing Disciples ()

[Go Slow]

A. An Evening on the Sea ()

John 6:16 KJV 1900
And when even was now come, his disciples went down unto the sea,
They that go down to the sea in ships, That do business in great waters; These see the works of the Lord, And his wonders in the deep. For he commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind, Which lifteth up the waves thereof. They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: Their soul is melted because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, And are at their wits’ end. Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble, And he bringeth them out of their distresses. He maketh the storm a calm, So that the waves thereof are still. Then are they glad because they be quiet; So he bringeth them unto their desired haven. Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness, And for his wonderful works to the children of men!” (, KJV 1900)
SAVE
CLASSIFICATION OF TEACHINGS
1. Our Lord
Son of man, 23; Son of God, 26, 31, 33; His humility, love of solitude, dependence upon the Father, 22, 23; teaches His disciples their weakness and dependence by trial, 22, 29; sends His disciples out into the storm, to pull against the wind, 22, 24; sees them while in the storm, 25; upholds them by His prayers while storm-tossed and toiling, 23–26; comes to them in the storm, 25; speaks comfort and cheer, 27; enters the boat with them, brings calm, 32; brings them safely and speedily to land, 34; answers prayer, promptly, stretches both His hands to, takes hold of, saves the sinking man, 30, 31.
2. The Disciples
Sent from the place of refreshment to place of conflict, obeyed and went, 22; sore distressed, pulled bravely against the wind, 24; did not recognize our Lord as He drew near, feared, 26; reassured by Him, 27; received Him into the boat, 32; found calm and a harbor, 34; worshipped Him, 33.
3. Peter
His desire to get to our Lord, to display himself, 28, 29; believed, walked on the waves, 29; got his eyes off from Jesus upon the wind, his faith faltered, was afraid, began to sink, cried unto the Lord, upheld, his unbelief rebuked, 30, 31.
4. Prayer
(1). When to pray:
In the stillness of the night, after exhaustive labors, in times of emergency, 23; when sinking, 30.
(2). Where to pray:
In the mountain alone with God, 23; in the tumult, 30.
(3). How to pray:
Sometimes protractedly, 23–25; sometimes briefly, definitely, personally, to the point, in faith, 30, 31.
(4). The need of prayer:
The Son of God prayed, 23.
(5). Results of prayer:
Walking on the waves, 25; deliverance from destruction, 30, 31; brings rest better than sleep, 23.
[R. A. Torrey, Studies in the Life and Teachings of Our Lord (Los Angeles: Bible Institute of Los Angeles, 1907), 111.]

B. In the Darkness without Jesus ()

John 6:17 KJV 1900
And entered into a ship, and went over the sea toward Capernaum. And it was now dark, and Jesus was not come to them.
By terrible things in righteousness wilt thou answer us, O God of our salvation; Who art the confidence of all the ends of the earth, and of them that are afar off upon the sea: Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains; Being girded with power: Which stilleth the noise of the seas, The noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people. They also that dwell in the uttermost parts are afraid at thy tokens: Thou makest the outgoings of the morning and evening to rejoice.” (, KJV 1900)
a
We learn to know the value of Christ’s company, when we have it, by the discomfort we experience when we have it not. [J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on John, vol. 1 (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1879), 339.]
[J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on John, vol. 1 (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1879), 339.]
SAVE
Application:
Let us look at these words in their more general aspect, as relating to the history of each saint and of the church at large. (1.) Night. (2.) Night without Jesus. (3.) Night with Jesus. (4.) Day with Jesus.
1. Night. All have their nights. The sinner’s history is all one long starless night. But the saint has his night too; his night of sorrow, of bereavement, of pain. The Church, too, has her night. She is “not of the night”; but she has “nights.” Darkness, tempest, danger, are around about. Persecution, poverty, desertion; “famine, and nakedness, and peril, and sword.” She has had many such nights, and will have them until her King arrives. There shall be no night then. But there is night now.
2. Night without Jesus. The sinner’s night is altogether without Jesus; nay, this is the very gloom of its darkness. But the saint has nights in which Jesus seems distant. “By night upon my bed I sought Him whom my soul loveth. I sought Him, but I found Him not.” Without Him altogether he cannot be; for the promise is, “Lo, I am with you always.” But there are times of sorrow, weakness, suffering, when He is not realised. And though the issue of these is to bring Him nearer, yet for a time He seems absent. The bond is not broken, but the joy is not tasted. The Church, too, has her nights of weariness and persecution in which He seems to stand aloof. It is dark, and He comes not.
3. Night with Jesus. His presence is everything. It cannot indeed make it not night; but it makes the night to seem as day. With Him the darkness is as the light. For having Him we have, (1.) Companionship; (2.) Protection; (3.) Safety; (4.) Comfort; (5.) Strength; (6.) Assurance of coming day. With these may we not rejoice in the night? It is the night that draws out these blessings; that makes Jesus more suitable, more necessary. Blessed night that introduces us more fully into the fellowship of Jesus.
4. Day with Jesus. Hitherto it has been night; yet during it the Church has had the Master’s presence; “Lo, I am with you always.” It has been good for her, indeed, to have Him with her during the world’s darkness. But He does not leave her when the day breaks. He does not say, Let me go, for the day breaketh. More than ever shall He be with her during the long day of glory which is at hand. “So shall we ever be with the Lord”! He with us, and we with Him. And if his presence made night not only endurable but even pleasant, what will not that presence make the coming day! [Bonar, 301–303.]
Horatius Bonar, Light and Truth: Or, Bible Thoughts and Themes, the Gospels (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1871), 301–303.
Transition: We have at the departing of the disciples and how it was only at the constraint of Christ that they followed His Word and will, now let’s consider...

II. The Winds & Water-Walker ()

[Climb Higher]

A. The Rising of the Storm ()

John 6:18 KJV 1900
And the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew.
Note - Describe the Sea of Galilee and the Geography.
“Small as the lake is, and placid in general as a molten mirror, I have repeatedly seen it quiver, and leap, and boil like a caldron, when driven by fierce winds.”—Thomson’s “Land and the Book.” [Ryle, 340.]
SAVE

B. The Sight of the Savior ()

John 6:19 KJV 1900
So when they had rowed about five and twenty or thirty furlongs, they see Jesus walking on the sea, and drawing nigh unto the ship: and they were afraid.
And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.” (, KJV 1900)
Which alone spreadeth out the heavens, And treadeth upon the waves of the sea.” (, KJV 1900)
The Lord sitteth upon the flood; Yea, the Lord sitteth King for ever.” (, KJV 1900)
The Lord on high is mightier Than the noise of many waters, Yea, than the mighty waves of the sea.” (, KJV 1900)
SAVE
In the center of an important section of the Gospel, as Jesus is beginning to be noticed by friends and foes, Jesus takes the opportunity to make himself known to his disciples and, therefore, to the readers through the Gospel’s witness. In what is a moment of both wonder and worship, the Gospel declares in God’s own words the identity of the Son. In this pericope, the reader of the Fourth Gospel is exhorted to encounter the “I am,” the one of the unconsumed burning bush () who alone can walk on the waves of the sea ().
Walking across the Stirring Waters - The archetypical symbol of water, connected to everything from creation to cleansing, is a dominant motif in the ancient world and the OT and is particularly significant in the Gospel of John. With this in view, there is a striking comparison between this pericope and its stirring waters and 5:1–18, in which the lame man (and a great multitude of the sick) huddle around so-called magical waters because they believe within them is the healing power of God. They believed that God, or at least his power, was in some way contained within the waters—precisely at the point where the waters stir. But neither God nor his power were contained in those waters. God and his power were entirely located in the person of Jesus, who walked across the surface of the stirring waters of the Sea of Galilee toward his disciples. Not only does the water fail to contain any power of God, but the water of the stirring sea failed to control God as he effortlessly walked across its surface with its waves only serving to wash his feet. Moses asked God to remove the water (cf. ); Jesus can walk directly over it. All the potent imagery of water in the OT has been placed “at the feet” of Jesus, the feet that approached the disciples in their boat. The church is to kneel at the feet of Jesus, the feet that walk on water. [Edward W. Klink III, John, ed. Clinton E. Arnold, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2016), 313-14.]
The archetypical symbol of water, connected to everything from creation to cleansing, is a dominant motif in the ancient world and the OT and is particularly significant in the Gospel of John. With this in view, there is a striking comparison between this pericope and its stirring waters and 5:1–18, in which the lame man (and a great multitude of the sick) huddle around so-called magical waters because they believe within them is the healing power of God. They believed that God, or at least his power, was in some way contained within the waters—precisely at the point where the waters stir. But neither God nor his power were contained in those waters. God and his power were entirely located in the person of Jesus, who walked across the surface of the stirring waters of the Sea of Galilee toward his disciples. Not only does the water fail to contain any power of God, but the water of the stirring sea failed to control God as he effortlessly walked across its surface with its waves only serving to wash his feet. Moses asked God to remove the water (cf. ); Jesus can walk directly over it. All the potent imagery of water in the OT has been placed “at the feet” of Jesus, the feet that approached the disciples in their boat. The church is to kneel at the feet of Jesus, the feet that walk on water. [Klink III, 313–314.]
OT Old Testament[Klink III, 313–314.]
Walking across the Stirring Waters - The archetypical symbol of water, connected to everything from creation to cleansing, is a dominant motif in the ancient world and the OT and is particularly significant in the Gospel of John. With this in view, there is a striking comparison between this pericope and its stirring waters and 5:1–18, in which the lame man (and a great multitude of the sick) huddle around so-called magical waters because they believe within them is the healing power of God. They believed that God, or at least his power, was in some way contained within the waters—precisely at the point where the waters stir. But neither God nor his power were contained in those waters. God and his power were entirely located in the person of Jesus, who walked across the surface of the stirring waters of the Sea of Galilee toward his disciples. Not only does the water fail to contain any power of God, but the water of the stirring sea failed to control God as he effortlessly walked across its surface with its waves only serving to wash his feet. Moses asked God to remove the water (cf. ); Jesus can walk directly over it. All the potent imagery of water in the OT has been placed “at the feet” of Jesus, the feet that approached the disciples in their boat. The church is to kneel at the feet of Jesus, the feet that walk on water. [Edward W. Klink III, John, ed. Clinton E. Arnold, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2016), 313-14.]
OT Old Testament[Klink III, 313–314.]
Edward W. Klink III, 313–314.]
Application:
Sometimes we are caught in a storm because we have disobeyed the Lord. Jonah is a good example. But sometimes the storm comes because we have obeyed the Lord. When that happens, we can be sure that our Saviour will pray for us, come to us, and deliver us. In writing the account of this event years later, perhaps John saw in it a picture of Christ and His church. Christ is in heaven interceding for us, but we are in the midst of the storms of life, trying to reach the shore. One day, He will come for us and we shall reach the port safely, the storms all past. Actually, there were several miracles involved in this event. Jesus walked on the water, and so did Peter (). Jesus stilled the storm, and instantly the boat was on the other shore. Of course, all of this happened at night so that only Jesus and His disciples knew what had occurred. Jesus had led His people into the green pastures (), and now He brought them into the still waters (). What a wonderful Shepherd He is! [Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 310.]
Actually, there were several miracles involved in this event. Jesus walked on the water, and so did Peter (). Jesus stilled the storm, and instantly the boat was on the other shore. Of course, all of this happened at night so that only Jesus and His disciples knew what had occurred. Jesus had led His people into the green pastures (), and now He brought them into the still waters (). What a wonderful Shepherd He is! [Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 310.]
Transition: The Disciples had departed, and the cyclone had engulfed their vessel, but the Water-Walker had come to them, and they were afraid, lastly, let’s note...

III. The "I Am" in Me ()

[Take Fire]

A. Words of Peace ()

John 6:20 KJV 1900
But he saith unto them, It is I; be not afraid.
a
“It is I; be not afraid” (6:20). It is a message which quiets our fears. The storms are blowing around us, the wind hurling past our rigging, and we feel as if we cannot go any further. Then the Christ of victory appears and says, “Be not afraid” (6:20). It is a message which quickens our faith“It is I” (6:20), said the Master. His presence makes all the difference and faith finds its anchorage in Him. [Stephen F. Olford, Institutes of Biblical Preaching, Volume Two (Memphis, TN: Olford Ministries International, 1981).]
“Immediately he talked with them, and saith unto them, Be of good cheer; it is I; be not afraid” (). What Christ said was just a few words, but they were very powerful words. His words of assurance removed fear and revealed God.
His words removed fear. “Be of good cheer … be not afraid.” Christ gave both a positive and negative command here to stop fear. The positive is “be of good cheer.” The negative is “be not afraid.” And note it was the Word of God which quieted the disciples’ fears; for when Christ “talked with them” (which talk was the Word of God), their attitude eventually changed from terror to tranquility and from worry to worship. In our troubles we will find great tranquility in the Word of God. Therefore, if we want tranquility in time of our trials, we need to get into the Word of God. Unfortunately, many folk try the remedies of the world before they try the Word, and that only aggravates their trials.
His words removed fear. “Be of good cheer … be not afraid.” Christ gave both a positive and negative command here to stop fear. The positive is “be of good cheer.” The negative is “be not afraid.” And note it was the Word of God which quieted the disciples’ fears; for when Christ “talked with them” (which talk was the Word of God), their attitude eventually changed from terror to tranquility and from worry to worship. In our troubles we will find great tranquility in the Word of God. Therefore, if we want tranquility in time of our trials, we need to get into the Word of God. Unfortunately, many folk try the remedies of the world before they try the Word, and that only aggravates their trials.
His words revealed God. “It is I.” These three words are only two words (ego eimi) in the Greek, and these two words are much more powerful and significant than most readers of the Bible realize. What Jesus said was “I am,” not “It is I.” This was a direct reference to the Deity of Jesus Christ. Some Bibles have a footnote pointing to . That is the great “I am” verse in Scripture. [John G. Butler, Jesus Christ: His Miracles, vol. 2, Studies of the Savior (Clinton, IA: LBC Publications, 2001), 132–133.]
His words revealed God. “It is I.” [John Butler
John G. Butler, Jesus Christ: His Miracles, vol. 2, Studies of the Savior (Clinton, IA: LBC Publications, 2001), 132–133.]
I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.” (, KJV 1900)
Fear thou not; for I am with thee: Be not dismayed; for I am thy God: I will strengthen thee; yea, I will help thee; Yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of my righteousness.” (, KJV 1900)
When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; And through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: When thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; Neither shall the flame kindle upon thee.” (, KJV 1900)
Fear ye not, neither be afraid: Have not I told thee from that time, And have declared it? ye are even my witnesses. Is there a God beside me? Yea, there is no God; I know not any.” (, KJV 1900)
SAVE
God in First Person - The voice in the burning bush () is the voice of Jesus Christ, who treads the waves of the sea. We have already been told Jesus reveals the Father (1:18), and in this pericope he speaks for him directly. Amidst all the interest in religion and spirituality, it is imperative that Jesus be understood as the only true spokesperson for God. God has spoken in the first person, the person of Jesus Christ. The church has heard the Word of God and thus declares that there is no other person through whom one can be saved (). This is spoken not by our own authority but by God’s own. We are the children of the first person, the one who came through the storm of our darkness to address us, announcing to us the thing we needed most: himself in the first person. [Klink III, 314.]
The voice in the burning bush () is the voice of Jesus Christ, who treads the waves of the sea. We have already been told Jesus reveals the Father (1:18), and in this pericope he speaks for him directly. Amidst all the interest in religion and spirituality, it is imperative that Jesus be understood as the only true spokesperson for God. God has spoken in the first person, the person of Jesus Christ. The church has heard the Word of God and thus declares that there is no other person through whom one can be saved (). This is spoken not by our own authority but by God’s own. We are the children of the first person, the one who came through the storm of our darkness to address us, announcing to us the thing we needed most: himself in the first person. [Klink III, 314.]
Edward W. Klink III, 314.]
The Bible says, “As iron sharpens iron, so a man sharpens the countenance of his friend.” () What that means is this: that a true friend will put an edge on your life. A true friend will make you a sharper person....How would you like to have a friend—a friend that would help you to live a clean life? How would you like to have a friend that would draw you closer to Jesus? How would you like to have a friend that would give you more strength? How would you like to have a friend that would help you to win your loved ones to Jesus Christ? How would you like to have a friend that would make you a mature believer in the Lord Jesus? Well, you already have that friend—and his name is trouble. Trouble: that’s the name of this strange friend....
How would you like to have a friend—a friend that would help you to live a clean life? How would you like to have a friend that would draw you closer to Jesus? How would you like to have a friend that would give you more strength? How would you like to have a friend that would help you to win your loved ones to Jesus Christ? How would you like to have a friend that would make you a mature believer in the Lord Jesus? Well, you already have that friend—and his name is trouble. Trouble: that’s the name of this strange friend....
I walked a mile with Pleasure;
She chatted all the way;
But left me none the wiser
For all she had to say.
I walked a mile with Sorrow,
And ne’er a word said she;
But, oh! The things I learned from her,
When sorrow walked with me.
—Robert Browning Hamilton
...Did you know, some 365 times in the Bible—one time for every day of the year—God has told us not to be afraid. In one way or another, He said “be not afraid,” or “fear not.” 365 times He tells us not to be afraid. The devil is the sinister minister of fear; but our Lord tells us not to be afraid....
Peace is not the subtraction of problems from life; peace is the addition of power to meet those problems. That’s God’s peace....
I don’t know what your problem is, I don’t know what your need is; but I know your answer. And. His name is Jesus.
Jesus is all this world needs today;
Blindly they strive for sin darkens their way.
Oh, to pull back the grim curtains of night;
One look at Jesus and all will be light.
And my advice for you, in the midst of your storm, is to see Jesus, the great I AM, and see Him walking on the water. And what looked like it was going to be over their head was already under His feet. Under His feet. And you’re seated in the heavenlies with Him. And you can’t drown with your head above water. [Adrian Rogers, “How to Find Peace in the Midst of Your Storm,” in Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive (Signal Hill, CA: Rogers Family Trust, 2017), .]
I don’t know what your problem is, I don’t know what your need is; but I know your answer. And. His name is Jesus.
Jesus is all this world needs today;
No Fear - In the presence of God, fear is both natural and unwarranted. In comparison to us and our reality, God is terrifying; yet when God is embraced there is no safer place. serves as almost a commentary on the command of Jesus: “be not afraid” (6:20). The psalmist declares that the presence of God creates a safe place; nations and kingdoms are rising up, yet at the mere sound of God’s voice the earth melts (). In the presence of God the command is clear: “Be still [or, “cease striving”] and know that I am God” (v. 10, emphasis added). Jesus commands his disciples not to fear because his presence had already announced by the psalmist: “The Lord Almighty is with us” (). The command extends beyond the psalms or the Sea of Galilee and enters the heart of the Christian, for whom God is present through the Son and his Spirit, and for whom the mere voice of the Lord is a constant support. Be still, Christians, for the Lord is with us. [Klink III, 314.]
Blindly they strive for sin darkens their way.
Oh, to pull back the grim curtains of night;
[Adrian Rogers, “How to Find Peace in the Midst of Your Storm,” in Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive (Signal Hill, CA: Rogers Family Trust, 2017), .]
In the presence of God, fear is both natural and unwarranted. In comparison to us and our reality, God is terrifying; yet when God is embraced there is no safer place. serves as almost a commentary on the command of Jesus: “Do not fear” (6:20). The psalmist declares that the presence of God creates a safe place; nations and kingdoms are rising up, yet at the mere sound of God’s voice the earth melts (). In the presence of God the command is clear: “Be still [or, “cease striving”] and know that I am God” (v. 10, emphasis added). Jesus commands his disciples not to fear because his presence had already announced by the psalmist: “The Lord Almighty is with us” (). The command extends beyond the psalms or the Sea of Galilee and enters the heart of the Christian, for whom God is present through the Son and his Spirit, and for whom the mere voice of the Lord is a constant support. Be still, Christians, for the Lord is with us. [Edward W. Klink III, John, ed. Clinton E. Arnold, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2016), 314.]
peace is not the subtraction of problems from life; peace is the addition of power to meet those problems. That’s God’s peace.
One look at Jesus and all will be light.
And my advice for you, in the midst of your storm, is to see Jesus, the great I AM, and see Him walking on the water. And what looked like it was going to be over their head was already under His feet. Under His feet. And you’re seated in the heavenlies with Him. And you can’t drown with your head above water.Adrian Rogers, “How to Find Peace in the Midst of Your Storm,” in Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive (Signal Hill, CA: Rogers Family Trust, 2017), .]
Edward W. Klink III, John, ed. Clinton E. Arnold, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2016), 314.]
Adrian Rogers, “How to Find Peace in the Midst of Your Storm,” in Adrian Rogers Sermon Archive (Signal Hill, CA: Rogers Family Trust, 2017), .]

B. Welcoming the Prince of Peace ()

John 6:21 KJV 1900
Then they willingly received him into the ship: and immediately the ship was at the land whither they went.
Hudson Taylor summed it up like this: “We are a supernatural people, born again by a supernatural birth; we wage a supernatural fight and are taught by a supernatural teacher, led by a supernatural captain to assured victory” (from Knight’s Master Book of New Illustrations).
Typical and Dispensational Teaching.—The Lord with them, the storm at once died down. In this we have a little picture of the Jewish remnant in the future, who will be buffeted, tried, and persecuted too, unable to cope with the powers of the Beast and of Antichrist, till the Lord comes back in person to earth, and identifies Himself with His poor and harassed people. Then the storm will for them become calm, and they will be landed on ground that never can give way beneath them. [C. E. Stuart, Tracings From The Gospel Of John (Galaxie Software, 2005), 151.]
C. E. Stuart, Tracings From The Gospel Of John (Galaxie Software, 2005), 151.]
Delays are not denials. He is as near in the storm as though already in the boat. The storm-waves are his pathway. Be not afraid! [F. B. Meyer, Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary, vol. 5 (Philadelphia: American Sunday-School Union, 1914–1918), 191.]
F. B. Meyer, Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary, vol. 5 (Philadelphia: American Sunday-School Union, 1914–1918), 191.]
SAVE
“God has not promised you smooth sailing; but He has promised you a safe landing.” ~Adrian Rogers
a
Receive Him! The vagueness of the narrative in regard to the events following the encounter with Jesus makes emphatic what was described: the reception of Jesus by his disciples. They were confused and scared, yet they were willing to receive him. They welcomed Jesus even though he could not have been less defined and explainable. They did the only thing they could do: trust him, which was the same thing they had to do when he first said to them, “Come and see” (cf. 1:39, 46). The call of the Christian and the task of discipleship can be described quite simply as having the same objective: trusting in the inexplicable and all-consuming God made known in Jesus Christ. Without all questions being answered and doubts being solved, the Christian trusts in the God who need say nothing more than “I am” in order to calm our fears. The Water-Walker has come and stands before the whole world, declaring as he did to his disciples on the stirring sea, “I am.” Will you receive him? Is there truly any other “I” that should take precedence? [Klink III, 314–315.]
The vagueness of the narrative in regard to the events following the encounter with Jesus makes emphatic what was described: the reception of Jesus by his disciples. They were confused and scared, yet they were willing to receive him. They welcomed Jesus even though he could not have been less defined and explainable. They did the only thing they could do: trust him, which was the same thing they had to do when he first said to them, “Come and see” (cf. 1:39, 46).
The call of the Christian and the task of discipleship can be described quite simply as having the same objective: trusting in the inexplicable and all-consuming God made known in Jesus Christ. Without all questions being answered and doubts being solved, the Christian trusts in the God who need say nothing more than “I am” in order to calm our fears. The Water-Walker has come and stands before the whole world, declaring as he did to his disciples on the stirring sea, “I am.” Will you receive him? Is there truly any other “I” that should take precedence? [Klink III, 314–315.]
Edward W. Klink III, John, ed. Clinton E. Arnold, Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2016), 314–315.]
The Disciples at Sea.* Chap. 6:16–21
1 Constrain’d by their Lord to embark,
And venture, without him, to sea;
The season tempestuous and dark,
How griev’d the disciples must be!
But though he remain’d on the shore,
He spent the night for them in pray’r;
They still were as safe as before,
And equally under his care.
2 They strove, though in vain, for a while,
The force of the waves to withstand;
But when they were weary’d with toil,
They saw their dear Saviour at hand:
They gladly receiv’d him on board,
His presence their spirits reviv’d,
The sea became calm at his word,
And soon at their port they arriv’d.
3 We, like the disciples, are toss’d
By storms on a perilous deep;
But cannot be possibly lost,
For Jesus has charge of the ship:
Though billows and winds are enrag’d,
And threaten to make us their sport,
This pilot his word has engag’d
To bring us, in safety, to port.
4 If sometimes we struggle alone,
And he is withdrawn from our view;
It makes us more willing to own
We nothing without him can do:
Then Satan our hopes would assail,
But Jesus is still within call;
And when our poor efforts quite fail,
He comes in good time and does all.
5 Yet, Lord, we are ready to shrink,
Unless we thy presence perceive;
O save us (we cry), or we sink,
We would, but we cannot, believe:
The night has been long and severe,
The winds and the seas are still high,
Dear Saviour, this moment appear,
And say to our souls, “It is I.”*
[* Book II. Hymn 87.] [* Book III. Hymn 18.] [John Newton and Richard Cecil, The Works of John Newton, vol. 3 (London: Hamilton, Adams & Co., 1824), 432–433.]]
* Book III. Hymn 18. [John Newton and Richard Cecil, The Works of John Newton, vol. 3 (London: Hamilton, Adams & Co., 1824), 432–433.]
[John Newton and Richard Cecil, The Works of John Newton, vol. 3 (London: Hamilton, Adams & Co., 1824), 432–433.]

Conclusion:

A. Call to Act/Summary of Message/Application:
Call/Summarize/Apply- The power of the presence of Jesus: Brings light to your darkness (v. 17), Sight to your blindness (v. 19), Calm to your frightening (v. 20), Deliverance from your storms (vv. 18, 21)
“Jesus is the ‘I am,’ the voice behind the unconsumed burning bush in , the one who walks across the stirring sea, who speaks on behalf of God in the first person. The presence of Jesus silences our fear and exposes our need to receive him in his fullness.” [ZECNT]
B. Gospel Invitation:
In just a moment, we are going to have an invitation for you to respond to what you've heard about the Lord today. Friend, God loves you, but it's not okay for you to leave here today without realizing how much trouble you might be in with God because of your sins if you have never believed on the Lord Jesus Christ. Why don't you change your mind toward Him? His love sent Jesus Christ, God's only Son, to die on the cross for all your sins. Won't you come and ask Jesus to come into your life and save you?
Friend, if God’s Word has shown you something about yourself, an area where you might be weak in faith, or something that He is wanting you to obey Him in, or just simply if the Lord is working in your life right now, your greatest need is to be right with Him. While the piano plays, don’t wait another moment. Now is the time to acknowledge that God is moving toward you, and you are moving toward Him. Step out, and come and kneel at the front somewhere, pray to God, and tell Him what’s on your heart. If you need to be saved, come and we’ll have someone, men with men and ladies with ladies, show you from the Bible how you can be saved today. If you would step out and decide to follow Jesus today, then why not come and tell Him so?
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