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God’s Last Invitation

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God’s Last Invitation
(Revelation 22:13–21)

Revelation 22:13-21 (KJV)  I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last. 14 Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city. 15 For without are dogs, and sorcerers, and whoremongers, and murderers, and idolaters, and whosoever loveth and maketh a lie. 16 I Jesus have sent mine angel to testify unto you these things in the churches. I am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star. 17 And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely. 18 For I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this book, If any man shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book: 19 And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book. 20 He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus. 21 The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen. [1]

 

Intro. - In these its concluding verses, the Bible comes full circle. It opened with the promise of a coming Savior, who would redeem His people from their sins. That promise, which came immediately after the Fall, is recorded in Genesis 3:15: “I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her seed; he shall bruise you on the head, and you shall bruise him on the heel.” Just as the Bible opens with the promise of Christ’s first coming, so it ends with the promise of His second coming.

The faithful Southern Baptist expositor W. A. Criswell writes:

First, the Saviour is to come that He might be crushed, bruised, crucified and made an offering for sin. He is to come to die as the Redeemer for the souls of men. After God made that promise in Eden, hundreds of years passed, millenniums passed, and the Lord did not come. When finally He did arrive He came unto His own and His own received Him not. He was in the world and the world was made by Him and the world knew Him not. The thousands of humanity had forgotten the promise or else they scoffed at its fulfillment. When finally announcement came that he had arrived, the learned scribes pointed out the place where He was to be born, but never took the time to journey the five miles from Jerusalem to Bethlehem to welcome this promised Saviour of the world. But however long he delayed and however men forgot and scoffed and however few of a faithful band waited for the consolation of Israel, as old Simeon, yet He came. In keeping with the holy, faithful promise of God, the Lord Jesus came. It is thus in the text that God speaks in closing His Bible, “Surely, I come quickly.” Here a second time, however infidels may scoff and however others may reject and however the centuries may grow into the millenniums, this is the immutable Word and promise of the Lord God, “Surely, I come.” (Expository Sermons on Revelation [Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1969], 5:176–77)

·         The second coming of the Lord Jesus Christ is a compelling theme in both the Old and New Testaments (e.g., Zech. 14:4; Mal. 3:2; 4:5; Matt. 16:28; 24:27; 1 Cor. 1:7; 15:23; 1 Thess. 2:19; 3:13; 4:15; 5:23; 2 Thess. 2:1; James 5:8; Jude 14).

·         But nowhere is it given greater emphasis than in the Apocalypse, the “Revelation of Jesus Christ” (1:1).

·         It is only fitting that this book, whose focus is on the Second Coming, ends with a final invitation in light of that glorious reality.

·         Verses 6–12 of this chapter are addressed to believers, demanding their proper response to Christ’s imminent return.

·         Verses 13–21 call unbelievers to repentance.  The inspired canon of Scripture closes with an urgent invitation, pleading with sinners to come to Jesus Christ and receive the free gift of eternal life before it is forever too late.

·         God’s final invitation to sinners comes in verse 17. But surrounding that invitation are several incentives designed to motivate people to respond to it.

1.        The InvitationRevelation 22:17 And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely. [2]

a.       There are two distinct invitations in this verse, delineated by the two exclamations, “Come.” The first part of the verse is a prayer addressed to Christ; the second part is an invitation addressed to sinners.

b.       The first part calls for Christ to come; the second part is the last call for sinners to come to faith in Christ.

c.        To Jesus’ promise of His imminent return (vv. 7, 12, 20), the Holy Spirit, the third Member of the Trinity responds, “Come.” The text does not specify why the Spirit especially desires Jesus to return, but the rest of Scripture suggests both a negative and a positive reason.

d.       Negatively, men and women throughout history have continually rejected, ignored, and denied Christ.

1.        They have mocked and blasphemed the work of the Spirit (Matt. 12:31), whose ministry is to point them to Christ (John 15:26; 16:8).

2.       Speaking of the wicked sinners before the Flood, God said, “My Spirit shall not strive with man forever, because he also is flesh; nevertheless his days shall be one hundred and twenty years” (Gen. 6:3).

3.        The stubborn, stiff-necked, hard-hearted Israelites provoked the Spirit repeatedly during their forty years of wilderness wandering (Heb. 3:7–8)—something they would continue to do throughout their history (cf. Neh. 9:30; Isa. 63:10; Acts 7:51).

4.       The sinful world’s blasphemous rejection of Jesus Christ will reach its apex during the Tribulation. That seven-year period will see Satan promote to power the two most vile and evil blasphemers who will ever live: the beast (Antichrist) and the false prophet. To those two wretched, demon-possessed sinners will go the dubious honor of being the first people cast into the final hell, the lake of fire (19:20).

5.        Throughout the long, dark centuries of mankind’s sin and rebellion, the Spirit has worked to bring about conviction and repentance (cf. John 16:8–11).

6.       So when the Lord Jesus Christ says He is coming, the long-suffering, grieved, blasphemed Holy Spirit echoes, “Come.” He pleads with Christ to return, subdue His enemies, judge sinners, and end the Spirit’s long battle to produce conviction in stubborn, hard-hearted sinners.

e.        On the positive side, it is the desire and ministry of the Spirit to glorify the Lord Jesus Christ (John 16:14).

1.        But the last view the world had of Jesus was of Him on a cross between two criminals, rejected, despised, and mocked.

2.       The Spirit longs to see His fellow Member of the Trinity exalted in beauty, splendor, power, and majesty.

3.        That will happen when Christ returns in triumph at His second coming.

4.       The Holy Spirit is not the only one who longs for Christ’s return. Echoing His plea for Christ to come is the bride .

5.        Throughout the centuries, God’s people have waited for, prayed for, hoped for, and watched for Christ’s return. They are weary of the battle against sin and long to see Jesus Christ exalted, glorified, and honored.

6.       They long for Him to return and take them to heaven to live with Him forever (John 14:3; 1 Thess. 4:17).

7.        They long for the day when their perishable, mortal bodies will be transformed into their imperishable, immortal resurrection bodies (1 Cor. 15:53–54). They know that in that glorious day there will be no more sorrow, no more tears, no more crying, no more pain, and no more death.

8.       Rebellion will be swiftly dealt with; God and the Lamb will be glorified and will reign forever over the new heaven and the new earth.

f.         Believers are, in the words of Paul, those “who have loved His appearing” (2 Tim. 4:8).

1.        It is incongruous for someone to claim to love Jesus Christ and not long for His return.

2.       Believers are destined for eternal fellowship with Him, and the anticipation of that fellowship should be their chief joy.

3.        The church will never be satisfied until it is presented to God “in all her glory, having no spot or wrinkle or any such thing; but that she would be holy and blameless” (Eph. 5:27).

2.       The second use of the exclamation “Come” signals a change in perspective.

a.        The invitation is no longer for Christ to return, but for sinners to come to saving faith in Him.

b.       The phrase let the one who hears say, “Come” invites those who hear the Spirit and the bride to join with them in calling for Christ’s return.

c.        Obviously, they cannot do so until they come to faith in Him; only the redeemed can truly long for Him to appear.

d.       The implicit warning is not to be like those who “having ears, do … not hear” (Mark 8:18; cf. Deut. 29:4; Jer. 5:21; 6:10; Ezek. 12:2).

1.        The one who hears with faith and believes is the one who will be saved, because “faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ” (Rom. 10:17).

2.       Hearing is often associated with obedience in Scripture (e.g., Matt. 7:24; Luke 6:47; 8:21; 11:28; John 5:24; 18:37). Those who hear and obey the gospel will join with the Spirit and the bride in calling for the return of Jesus Christ, because they desire His glory—and their own deliverance from sin’s presence—in the realm of perfect holiness.

3.        The one who hears is further defined as the one who is thirsty. Thirst is a familiar biblical metaphor picturing the strong sense of spiritual need that is a prerequisite for repentance.

4.       In Isaiah God calls “every one who thirsts [to] come to the waters” of salvation (Isa. 55:1).

5.         Jesus pronounced those “blessed … who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied” (Matt. 5:6).

6.       In John 7:37 He gave the invitation, “If anyone is thirsty, let him come to Me and drink,” while earlier in Revelation He promised, “I will give to the one who thirsts from the spring of the water of life without cost” (21:6; cf. Ps. 107:9; John 4:14; 6:35).

3.        Adding another dimension to the invitation, John writes let the one who wishes take the water of life without cost.

a.        That unlimited invitation is typical of the broad, sweeping, gracious offers of salvation made in Scripture (cf. Isa. 45:22; 55:1; Matt. 11:28; John 3:15–16).

b.       It also illustrates the biblical truth that salvation involves both God’s sovereign choice (cf. John 6:44) and human volition.

c.        God saves sinners, but only those who recognize their need and repent.

d.       The water of life (or the washing of regeneration, Titus 3:5) is offered without cost (cf. Isa. 55:1) to the sinner because Jesus paid the price for it through His sacrificial death on the cross (Rom. 3:24).

e.        God freely offers the water of life to those whose hearts are thirsty for forgiveness, whose minds are thirsty for truth, and whose souls are thirsty for Him.

2.       The Incentives  - “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.”Blessed are those who wash their robes, so that they may have the right to the tree of life, and may enter by the gates into the city. Outside are the dogs and the sorcerers and the immoral persons and the murderers and the idolaters, and everyone who loves and practices lying.“I, Jesus, have sent My angel to testify to you these things for the churches. I am the root and the descendant of David, the bright morning star.” … I testify to everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book: if anyone adds to them, God will add to him the plagues which are written in this book; and if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God will take away his part from the tree of life and from the holy city, which are written in this book. He who testifies to these things says, “Yes, I am coming quickly.” Amen. Come, Lord Jesus. The grace of the Lord Jesus be with all. Amen. (22:13–16, 18–21)

·         Surrounding the invitation in verse 17 are four incentives for sinners to accept it: because of the Lord’s Person, because of the exclusivity of heaven, because of the truthfulness of Scripture, and because of the certainty of the Savior’s return.

A.      because of christ’s person“I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.” … “I, Jesus, have sent My angel to testify to you these things for the churches. I am the root and the descendant of David, the bright morning star.” (22:13, 16)

a.        The first reason for sinners to accept God’s final invitation is because it comes personally from the exalted, majestic, glorious Lord Jesus Christ.

b.       The Lord’s threefold identification of Himself repeats the same truth for emphasis. Since the original readers of Revelation spoke Greek, Jesus identifies Himself first as the Alpha and the Omega (cf. 1:8; 21:6).

1.        Alpha and Omega are, respectively, the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet. Together with the parallel phrases the first and the last (cf. 1:17) and the beginning (the source of all things) and the end (the goal of all things), it expresses Christ’s infinity, eternity, and boundless life transcending all limitations.

2.       This threefold description describes the completeness, timelessness, and sovereign authority of the Lord Jesus Christ.

3.        This description of Jesus Christ is also a statement of His deity. Obviously, there can be only one Alpha and Omega, first and last, and beginning and end—God.

4.       In 1:8 God says, “I am the Alpha and the Omega,” while 21:6 describes Him as “the beginning and the end.” In Isaiah 44:6 God declares, “I am the first and I am the last” (cf. Isa. 41:4; 48:12).

5.        That all three titles, which can apply only to God, are used here of Jesus Christ offers convincing testimony to His deity. He is not a created being; He is not merely a great prophet or a great moral teacher; He is not a misguided martyr. He is God the Son, the second Person of the eternal Trinity.

6.       Salvation in Jesus Christ is the theme of Scripture. In the Old Testament the ark in which Noah and his family were saved, the Passover lamb, and the kinsman redeemer are all pictures of Christ.

7.        In addition, Christ fulfilled more than 300 Old Testament prophecies at His first coming. He is the focus of the New Testament as well. The gospels record His life and ministry, and the rest of the New Testament expounds their doctrinal and practical implications.

8.       To be saved is to be saved by Christ; to be a Christian is to be in Christ; to have forgiveness is to be forgiven by Christ; to have hope is to have hope in Christ; in short, for the Christian “to live is Christ” (Phil. 1:21).

c.        Christ further identifies Himself in His own words in verse 16. But before doing so He tells John, “I, Jesus, have sent My angel to testify to you.”

1.        Though angels communicated the Apocalypse to John (v. 6; 1:1; 17:1, 7; 21:9), its source was Jesus.

2.       The expression “I, Jesus” appears only here in the Bible. It establishes that this final invitation in Scripture is not a human invitation, but a divine call issued personally to sinners by the Lord Jesus Christ.

3.        The Apocalypse is addressed to the churches (1:11), but though it is written to believers (1:1), they are to proclaim it to the entire world (cf. 22:10).

4.       Then, in an astounding, seemingly paradoxical statement, Jesus declares Himself to be both the root (ancestor) and the descendant of David. That phrase sums up the biblical teaching on Christ’s two natures; only the God-man can be both David’s ancestor and his descendant.

5.        In His deity, Christ is David’s root (cf. Mark 12:35–37); in His humanity, He is David’s descendant (2 Sam. 7:12–16; Ps. 132:11–12; Matt. 1:1; Rom. 1:3; 2 Tim. 2:8).

d.       Finally, Jesus describes Himself as “the bright morning star.”

1.        To call someone a star was in biblical times (as it is today) to exalt him (cf. Dan. 12:3).

2.       In extrabiblical Jewish writings, the coming Messiah was called a star (Robert H. Mounce, The Book of Revelation, The New International Commentary on the New Testament [Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1977], 395).

3.        Though Balaam was a greedy prophet for hire, God nevertheless used him to make an accurate prediction of the coming Messiah: “A star shall come forth from Jacob, a scepter shall rise from Israel” (Num. 24:17).

4.       Peter wrote of the time when “the day dawns and the morning star arises in your hearts” (2 Pet. 1:19).

5.        Jesus promised to give the overcomers at Thyatira the “morning star” (2:28)—that is, Himself.

6.       As the morning star heralds the arrival of the day, so Jesus’ coming will herald the end of the darkness of man’s night, and the glorious dawn of His kingdom.

7.        Christ is the “Light of the world” (John 8:12) who calls sinners to drink of the water of life. And to those who heed that call He promises, “Come to Me, all who are weary and heavy-laden, and I will give you rest” (Matt. 11:28); and “The one who comes to Me I will certainly not cast out” (John 6:37).

B.     because of the exclusivity of heaven -  Revelation 22:14-15 (KJV)  Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city. 15 For without are dogs, and sorcerers, and whoremongers, and murderers, and idolaters, and whosoever loveth and maketh a lie. [3]

a.        This section begins with the last of the seven beatitudes in Revelation (v. 7; 1:3; 14:13; 16:15; 19:9; 20:6), each introduced by the pronouncement blessed.

                                                                                       i.      This blessing is pronounced (most likely by the Lord Jesus Christ) on those who wash their robes.

                                                                                      ii.      That phrase graphically portrays the believer’s participation in the death of Christ. In 7:14 one of the twenty-four elders said to John, “These [the Tribulation martyrs; 7:9] are the ones who come out of the great tribulation, and they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.”

                                                                                    iii.      Soiled clothes represent sinfulness in Isaiah 64:6 and Zechariah 3:3, whereas Psalm 51:7; Isaiah 1:18; and Titus 3:5 speak of the cleansing of sin that accompanies salvation.

                                                                                    iv.      The agency through which that cleansing comes is the blood of Christ (1:5; 5:9; 7:14; Matt. 26:28; Acts 20:28; Rom. 3:24–25; 5:9; Eph. 1:7; 2:13; Col. 1:20; Heb. 9:12, 14; 10:19; 13:12; 1 Pet. 1:2, 18–19; 1 John 1:7).

                                                                                      v.      Those who have experienced the washing from sin that marks salvation will forever have the right to the tree of life.

                                                                                    vi.      the tree of life is located in the capital city of heaven, the New Jerusalem. This will be the fulfillment of Jesus’ promise, “To him who overcomes, I will grant to eat of the tree of life which is in the Paradise of God” (2:7).

                                                                                   vii.      Those granted access to the tree of life, will be allowed to enter by the gates into the city (cf. the discussion of 1:21 in chap. 19 of this volume).

b.       Heaven is exclusively for those who have been cleansed from their sins by faith in the blood of Christ and whose names have been “written from the foundation of the world in the book of life of the Lamb who has been slain” (13:8).

c.        In contrast, everyone else will remain forever outside the New Jerusalem in the lake of fire (20:15; 21:8), because “nothing unclean, and no one who practices abomination and lying, shall ever come into it, but only those whose names are written in the Lamb’s book of life” (21:27).

d.       As in 21:8, a representative (though not exhaustive) list of the type of sins that exclude people from heaven is given to John.

e.        Dogs  - The inclusion of dogs on the list seems puzzling at first glance.

                                                                                       i.      But in ancient times dogs were not the domesticated household pets they are today.

                                                                                      ii.      They were despised scavengers that milled about cities’ garbage dumps (cf. Ex. 22:31; 1 Kings 14:11; 16:4; 21:19, 23–24; 22:38).

                                                                                    iii.      Thus, to call a person a dog was to describe that person as someone of low character (cf. 1 Sam. 17:43; 24:14; 2 Sam. 3:8; 9:8; 16:9; 2 Kings 8:13; Phil. 3:2); in fact, the first time blatantly impure sinners are called dogs is in Deuteronomy 23:18, where male homosexual prostitutes are in view.

f.         Sorcerers (from pharmakos, the root of the English word “pharmacy”) refers to those engaged in occult practices and the drug abuse that often accompanies those practices (cf. 9:21; 21:8; Gal. 5:20).

g.       Immoral persons (from pornos, the root of the English word “pornography”) are those who engage in illicit sexual activities.

h.       Murderers are also excluded from heaven in the list given in 21:8 (cf. 9:21; Rom. 1:29).

i.         Idolaters are those who worship false gods, or who worship the true God in an unacceptable manner (cf. 21:8).

j.         The final group excluded from heaven also includes everyone who loves and practices lying.

k.        It is not all who have ever committed any of these sins who are excluded from heaven (cf. 1 Cor. 6:11). Rather, it is those who love and habitually practice any such sin, stubbornly cling to it, and refuse Christ’s invitation to salvation who will be cast into the lake of fire.

C.      because of the truthfulness of scriptureI testify to everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book: if anyone adds to them, God will add to him the plagues which are written in this book; and if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God will take away his part from the tree of life and from the holy city, which are written in this book. (22:18–19)

a.        It is of great significance that the Bible closes with an affirmation of its truthfulness. Because the words of Scripture are “faithful and true” (22:6), they must not be sealed up, but proclaimed (22:10).

b.       Sinners are to be called to respond to the warnings in the Word of the living God or suffer the consequences. All the prophecies of Revelation regarding the doom of sinners will come true.

c.        That terrifying certainty should drive people to Jesus Christ to escape the wrath to come (1 Thess. 1:10).

d.       The speaker who testifies to the authority and finality of the words of the prophecy of this book is none other than the Lord Jesus Christ (cf. v. 20).

e.        His solemn warning against tampering with Scripture applies first of all to the prophecy of the book of Revelation (cf. 1:3). Its stern rebukes of Jezebel and her followers (2:20–23), those who had embraced the “deep things of Satan” (2:24), and those of the “synagogue of Satan” (3:9) would have prompted them to assault it.

                                                                                       i.      Down through the centuries there have been others who have both attacked Revelation and seriously misinterpreted it.

                                                                                      ii.      But in light of the repeated warnings against altering God’s Word, Christ’s warning must be broadened to include all of Scripture.

                                                                                    iii.      In Deuteronomy 4:2 Moses cautioned, “You shall not add to the word which I am commanding you, nor take away from it, that you may keep the commandments of the Lord your God which I command you.”

                                                                                    iv.      In Deuteronomy 12:32 he added, “Whatever I command you, you shall be careful to do; you shall not add to nor take away from it.”

                                                                                      v.      Proverbs 30:5–6 warns, “Every word of God is tested; He is a shield to those who take refuge in Him. Do not add to His words or He will reprove you, and you will be proved a liar.”

f.         The canon of Scripture was closed at the end of the first century when Revelation was finished.

                                                                                       i.      Thus, any false prophet, fraud, or charlatan who adds alleged new revelations to it (as the Montanists did in the early church and Joseph Smith, Mary Baker Eddy, and other false prophets have done in recent times) will face divine vengeance.

                                                                                      ii.      God will add to such people the plagues which are written in the book of Revelation.

                                                                                    iii.      God’s judgment will be equally severe on anyone who takes away from the words of Scripture (as the heretic Marcion did in the early church and liberal higher critics have done in modern times)—God will take away their part from the tree of life and from the holy city.

                                                                                    iv.      Both warnings contain a play on words. Those who add to Scripture will have plagues added to them; those who take away from Scripture will have the blessings of heaven taken away from them.

g.       No true believer would ever deliberately tamper with Scripture. Those who know and love God will treat His Word with the utmost respect.

                                                                                       i.      They will say with the psalmist, “O how I love Your law!” (Ps. 119:97; cf. Pss. 119:113, 163, 167; John 14:23); and, “I delight in Your law” (Ps. 119:70; cf. Pss. 1:2; 119:77, 92, 174).

                                                                                      ii.      That does not, of course, mean that believers will never make errors in judgment or mistakenly interpret Scripture incorrectly or inadequately. The Lord’s warning here is addressed to those who engage in deliberate falsification or misinterpretation of Scripture, those whom Paul denounces as peddlers of the Word of God (2 Cor. 2:17).

D.      because of the certainty of christ’s return -   He who testifies to these things says, “Yes, I am coming quickly.” Amen. Come, Lord Jesus. The grace of the Lord Jesus be with all. Amen. (22:20–21)

a.        The book of Revelation and the Bible close with one final reminder and a benediction. In His last recorded words in Scripture the Lord Jesus Christ, He who testifies to these things, affirms “Yes, I am coming quickly.”

b.       His coming is imminent, just as Revelation (and the rest of the New Testament) teaches. John speaks for all true believers when he responds, Amen. Come, Lord Jesus, since Christians are those “who have loved His appearing” (2 Tim. 4:8).

c.        Scoffers may mockingly ask, “Where is the promise of His coming? For ever since the fathers fell asleep, all continues just as it was from the beginning of creation” (2 Pet. 3:4).

d.       But things will not continue forever as they are. Jesus will return, just as Revelation predicts. If the certainty of Christ’s return to judge sinners does not motivate people to repent, then nothing will.

e.        For the glorious, comforting truth is that those who humble themselves and accept God’s offer of salvation will find Him gracious.

f.         Fittingly, the last words of the Bible, the grace of the Lord Jesus be with all. Amen, are an expression of God’s grace toward fallen humanity.

g.       The Lord of glory, as He promised in Scripture, offers heaven exclusively to those who, in light of His certain return, accept His gracious invitation and return to Him.


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[1]  The Holy Bible : King James Version. 1995 (electronic ed. of the 1769 edition of the 1611 Authorized Version.). Bellingham WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

[2]  The Holy Bible : King James Version. 1995 (electronic ed. of the 1769 edition of the 1611 Authorized Version.). Bellingham WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

vv. verses

cf. confer (Lat.), compare

v. verse

[3]  The Holy Bible : King James Version. 1995 (electronic ed. of the 1769 edition of the 1611 Authorized Version.). Bellingham WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

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