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Shock by Jesus (Mark 8:27-30)

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Zakir Naik video
A while back I watched a video on YouTube. A religious leader from another faith challenged a Christian. The religious leader asked the Christian “Tell me! Did Jesus say he is God? If you cannot proof it then you will deny your faith in Jesus Christ and give up Christianity and convert”. The Christian was dumbfounded.
The deity of Jesus Christ is often disputed by unbelievers and atheists.
Freud sees Jesus as a projection of our inner desire.
Karl Marx asserts that Jesus was a way of keeping the hungry masses quiet.
Nietzsche says that Jesus taught a wimpish religion that sapped the energy of humanity.
Islam acknowledges Jesus was a prophet. He could perform miracles but He was not God. Muslims deny that Jesus died on the cross. Jesus’ death was an illusion.
Judaism believed that Jesus was a miracle worker. Jews today can affirm Jesus’ death on the cross but they deny Jesus resurrection and Jesus’ claim as Messiah and Son of God.
Hindus believed that Jesus was a holy man and wise teacher. But they do not see Jesus as the only way to God. They see Jesus as a symbol of self-realization. A good person in whom you can become.
Buddhism sees Jesus as an enlightened teacher. A teacher with great wisdom. Jesus lived a sacrificial life and demonstrated compassion. This is the key to happiness and enlightenment. However Buddhists do not believe Jesus is divine.
pg 73, 56,
1) He was a good man
2) He was a teacher of great spiritual truths, but he is not the miracle-working Messiah. He is not divine and is not the preexisted Second Person of the Trinity.
The common conclusion from all of them is that Jesus is not the Messiah and definitely not God.
When I was assigned to preach this message, I was confronted with 2 questions:
Who is Jesus?
Who is Jesus to me?
It set me on a journey to deeply reflect on my faith in the last few weeks. I have known Jesus all my life. He was a presence of love, speaking gently to me through His Word. I’ve done my best to follow him, to know him and to find out what he wants me to do. He was undemanding, although sometimes challenging. Warning me of dangers but grieving when I went astray. He was often forgiving when I turn back to him. Receiving me into his loving arms and applying his healing to my soul.
I believe we can all identify with this romanticized idea of Jesus. But when the dust settles and we truly reflect who Jesus actually is. Let us question if Jesus as a presence of healing and comforting a figment of our imagination?
Karl Marx noted that Jesus was a way of keeping the hungry masses quiet.
Nietzsche says that Jesus taught a wimpish religion that sapped the energy of humanity.
When we read stories of Jesus in the gospels, some of us moralize how we can behave better in the coming week, how we can prayer better, how we can meditate on God’s word better, how we can motivate ourselves to think and live better. All these are good and well but I think it all frustrates Jesus.
I think this truly frustrates Jesus.
If we take a good hard look at the gospels, we are confronted by a Jesus larger than our life. More disturbing. More urgent than how we have distill him into a motivational sermon or exemplary figure of good living.
Jesus was not the kind of king the people envisioned in his day. They had become accustomed to monarch of the old. The warrior king type that sits on the jeweled thrones. But Jesus was none of that. The people were looking for a builder to build the home they wanted. But Jesus was the architect who came with a new plan. They were looking for a singer to sing their song. But Jesus was the composer bringing them a new song. The old song is at best a background music.
Jesus was the true king, the Messiah. The Son of God.
Mark begins his book in the first verse.
Mark 1:1 NIV
The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God,
The crucial significance of Mark’s narrative is found right in the center of his book.
Mark 8:27–30 ESV
And Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi. And on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” And they told him, “John the Baptist; and others say, Elijah; and others, one of the prophets.” And he asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Christ.” And he strictly charged them to tell no one about him.
In this scene, Mark establishes Jesus as the Messiah. This becomes the turning point in Mark’s story. The character begins to morph. It’s like watching a super hero movie where the superhero is revealed. His true identity is revealed to the audiences and the story takes a different direction. But the characters of the story remains blinded to the true identity of the hero.
In this scene, Mark establishes Jesus as the Messiah.
In the same way, I think it is time for us to recognize Jesus for who He is. We
Like Jesus’ contemporaries, they too failed to recognize Jesus for who he is and who he will be. In our own day, many want a religious leader but not a king. We want someone to save our souls, not rule our world. The reason is because in our modern world, our minds are conformed to a democratic mindset. We want a government to implement the policies we embrace, not a king to reign over our lives.
What did Jesus think and believe about himself? Some have argued that Jesus did not himself make any claim to be God. His message was entirely about the Father, not about himself. We are therefore called to believe with Jesus, not in Jesus. It is true that Jesus did not make an explicit and overt claim to deity. He did not say in so many words, “I am God.” What we do find, however, are claims that would be inappropriate if made by someone who is less than God. For example,
have argued that Jesus did not himself make any claim to be God. His message
was entirely about the Father, not about himself. We are therefore called to believe
with Jesus, not in Jesus.1
It is true that Jesus did not make an explicit and overt claim to deity. He did
not say in so many words, “I am God.” What we do find, however, are claims that
would be inappropriate if made by someone who is less than God. For example,
Jesus said that he would send “his angels” (); elsewhere they are spoken of as “the angels of God” (; ). That reference is particularly significant, for he spoke not only of the angels but also of the kingdom as his: “The Son of Man will send out his angels, and they will weed out of his kingdom everything that causes sin and all who do evil.” This kingdom is repeatedly referred to as the kingdom of God, even in Matthew’s Gospel (12:28; 19:24; 21:31, 43), where one would expect to find “kingdom of heaven” instead.
of as “the angels of God” (; ). That reference is particularly
significant, for he spoke not only of the angels but also of the kingdom as his:
quest to discover what Jesus was actually like and what he did was called the “search for the historical Jesus”. The earthly Jesus was depicted as basically a good man, a teacher of
“The Son of Man will send out his angels, and they will weed out of his kingdom
everything that causes sin and all who do evil.” This kingdom is repeatedly referred
to as the kingdom of God, even in Matthew’s Gospel (12:28; 19:24; 21:31, 43),
where one would expect to find “kingdom of heaven” instead.
More significant yet are the prerogatives Jesus claimed. In particular, his claim to forgive sins resulted in a charge of blasphemy against him. When the paralytic was lowered through the roof by his four friends, Jesus’s initial comment was, “Son, your sins are forgiven” (). The reaction of the scribes indicates the meaning they attached to his words: “Why does this fellow talk like that? He’s blaspheming! Who can forgive sins but God alone?” (v. 7). their reaction shows that they interpreted Jesus’s comment “as the exercising of a divine prerogative, the power to actually forgive sins.”2 Here was an excellent opportunity for Jesus to clarify the situation, to correct the scribes if they had indeed misunderstood the import of his words. This he did not do, however. His response is highly instructive: “‘Why are you thinking these things? Which is easier: to say to this paralyzed man, “Your sins are forgiven,” or to say, “Get up, take your mat and walk”? But I want you to know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins.’ So he said to the man, ‘I tell you, get up, take your mat and go home’” (vv. 8—11). Jesus claimed other prerogatives as well. In he speaks of judging the world. He will sit on his glorious throne and divide the sheep from goats. Their immediate reaction to Jesus’s claim that he existed before Abraham was to take up stones to throw at him (). Certainly this is an indication that they thought him guilty of blasphemy, for stoning was the prescription for blasphemy ().
that they interpreted Jesus’s comment “as the exercising of a divine prerogative,
forgive sins resulted in a charge of blasphemy against him. When the paralytic was
the power to actually forgive sins.”2 Here was an excellent opportunity for Jesus to
up stones to throw at him (). Certainly this is an indication that they
clarify the situation, to correct the scribes if they had indeed misunderstood the
lowered through the roof by his four friends, Jesus’s initial comment was, “Son, your
import of his words. This he did not do, however. His response is highly instructive:
“‘Why are you thinking these things? Which is easier: to say to this paralyzed man,
sins are forgiven” (). The reaction of the scribes indicates the meaning they
thought him guilty of blasphemy, for stoning was the prescription for blasphemy
“Your sins are forgiven,” or to say, “Get up, take your mat and walk”? But I want
you to know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins.’ So he said
attached to his words: “Why does this fellow talk like that? He’s blaspheming! Who
to the man, ‘I tell you, get up, take your mat and go home’” (vv. 8—11).
().
Jesus claimed other prerogatives as well. In he speaks of
can forgive sins but God alone?” (v. 7).
judging the world. He will sit on his glorious throne and divide the sheep from
great spiritual truths, but not the miracle-working, preexistent Second Person
in connection with his trial and condemnation. The charge, according to John’s account, was that “he claimed to be the Son of God” (). Matthew reports the high priest to have said at the trial, “I charge you under oath by the living God: Tell us if you are the Messiah, the Son of God” (). “You have said so,” Jesus replied. “But I say to all of you: From now on you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds of heaven” (v. 64). This is as clear a declaration of his deity as one can find in the Gospels. Some have argued that Jesus was speaking satirically, and saying in effect, “You said that, not I.” It is true that the personal pronoun is used here to supplement the second-person singular of the verb, suggesting that the emphasis of the sentence falls on the subject—“ You said that!” However, two additional observations need to be made: (1) Jesus went on to speak of his power and second coming, thus confirming rather than contradicting the charge; (2) Jesus had an ideal opportunity here to correct any misconception that may have been involved. He could have avoided execution simply by denying that he was the Son of God, but he did not do that. Either he desired to die, albeit on a false charge, or he did not respond because the charge brought against him was correct. The Jews’ reaction is instructive. The high priest said, “‘He has spoken blasphemy! Why do we need any more witnesses? Look, now you have heard the blasphemy. What do you think?’ ‘He is worthy of death,’ they answered” (). The crime was that Jesus claimed what only God has the right to claim. Here we have Jesus in effect asserting, through acquiescence, his equality with the Father.
of the Trinity.
account, was that “he claimed to be the Son of God” (). Matthew reports
Not only did Jesus not dispute the charge that he claimed to be God, but he also accepted his disciples’ attribution of deity to him. The clearest case of this is his response to Thomas’s statement, “My Lord and my God!” ().
Throughout Jesus’ ministry Jesus proclaimed Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near” (). He said that he had come “to give his life as a ransom for many” ().
He said that he had come “to give his life as a ransom for many” ().
the high priest to have said at the trial, “I charge you under oath by the living
also accepted his disciples’ attribution of deity to him. The clearest case of this
Jesus was the Messiah, the Anointed One. In the Old Testament, people were anointed to particular roles (e.g., priest or king). So when we speak of Jesus as the Christ, or Anointed One, we must ask to what role(s) he was anointed.
God: Tell us if you are the Messiah, the Son of God” (). “You have
is his response to Thomas’s statement, “My Lord and my God!” ().
people were anointed to particular roles (e.g., priest or king). So when we
1. Jesus reveals God’s love to us
said so,” Jesus replied. “But I say to all of you: From now on you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds
speak of Jesus as the Christ, or Anointed One, we must ask to what role(s) he
The purpose of Christ’s death was to demonstrate the greatness of God’s love—he sent his Son to die. Shown this proof of God’s love and impressed by this demonstration of its depth, humans are moved to respond to him. Whoever has heard the teachings of Jesus, understood his death to be a sign of God’s great love, and responded appropriately has fully experienced Christ’s work, a work that is primarily revelatory. humans’ problem is that they are alienated from God. They have quarreled with God and believe that God is angry with them. They may also feel that God has mistreated them, sending undeserved evils into their lives; consequently, humans may look upon God as a malevolent, not a benevolent, being.
they are alienated from God. They have quarreled with God and believe that God
is angry with them. They may also feel that God has mistreated them, sending
2. Jesus reveals God’s kingdom
undeserved evils into their lives; consequently, humans may look upon God as a
malevolent, not a benevolent, being.
of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds
was anointed.
the greatness of God’s love—he sent his Son to die. Shown this proof of
The Gospels picture Jesus as a king, the ruler over the entire universe. Isaiah had anticipated a future ruler who would sit on David’s throne (). The writer to the Hebrews applies to the Son of God: “Your throne, O God, will last for ever and ever; a scepter of justice will be the scepter of your kingdom” (). Jesus himself said that in the new world the Son of Man would sit on a glorious throne (). He claimed that the kingdom of heaven was his (
had anticipated a future ruler who would sit on David’s throne (). The
writer to the Hebrews applies to the Son of God: “Your throne, O
God, will last for ever and ever; a scepter of justice will be the scepter of your
kingdom” (). Jesus himself said that in the new world the Son of Man
would sit on a glorious throne (). He claimed that the kingdom of
heaven was his (
of heaven” (v. 64). This is as clear a declaration of his deity as one can find in
God’s love and impressed by this demonstration of its depth, humans are moved
A problem arises here. Just as there is a tendency to think of Jesus‘s work of revelation as being in the past. there is also a tendency to think of his rule as being almost exclusively in the future. For as we look about us at the present time, we do not see him ruling very actively True. the Bible states that he is a king, and the Jerusalem crowd so hailed him on what we now. call Palm Sunday It is as if the door of heaven was opened a bit so that tor a brief time his true status was seen. Despite this. at the, present time there seems to be little empirical evidence that our Lord rules over the entire creation and particularly the human race.
the Gospels. Some have argued that Jesus was speaking satirically, and saying in
to respond to him. Whoever has heard the teachings of Jesus, understood his death
newlation as being in the past. there is also a tendency to think of his rule as being
effect, “You said that, not I.” It is true that the personal pronoun is used here to
to be a sign of God’s great love, and responded appropriately has fully experienced
almost exclusively in the future. For as we look about us at the present time, we
supplement the second-person singular of the verb, suggesting that the emphasis
Christ’s work, a work that is primarily revelatory.
do not see him ruling very actixely True. the Bible states that he is a king, and the
of the sentence falls on the subject—“ You said that!” However, two additional
Jerusalem crowd so hailed him on what we now. call Palm Sunday It is as if the
observations need to be made: (1) Jesus went on to speak of his power and second
door of heaven was opened a bit so that tor a brief time his true status was seen.
coming, thus confirming rather than contradicting the charge; (2) Jesus had an
Despite this. at the, present time there seems to be little empiric.~il evidence that
ideal opportunity here to correct any misconception that may have been involved.
our Lord rules over the entire creation and p.-irticula rly the human race.
He could have avoided execution simply by denying that he was the Son of God,
First of all. we need to note that. on the contrary; there is evidence that Christ is ruling today: In particular. the natural universe obeys him. Since Christ is the one through whom all things came into being () and through whom all things continue (). he is in control of the natural universe. It was therefore appropriate for him to say that. had the people kept silent on Palm Sunday; the stones would have cried out; this is but another form of the truth expressed in the psalmist‘s affirmation that the heavens declare the glory of God ().
but he did not do that. Either he desired to die, albeit on a false charge, or he
is ruling today: In particular. the natural universe obeys him. Since Christ is the
did not respond because the charge brought against him was correct. The Jews’
one through whom all things came into being () and through whom all
reaction is instructive. The high priest said, “‘He has spoken blasphemy! Why do
things continue (). he is in control of the natural universe. It was therefore
we need any more witnesses? Look, now you have heard the blasphemy. What do
appropriate for him to say that. had the people kept silent on Palm Sunday;
you think?’ ‘He is worthy of death,’ they answered” (). The crime
the stones would have cried out; this is but another form of the truth expressed
was that Jesus claimed what only God has the right to claim. Here we have Jesus
in the psalmist‘s affirmation that the heavens declare the glory of God ().
in effect asserting, through acquiescence, his equality with the Father.
But is there evidence of a reign of Christ over modern-day humans? Indeed there is. The kingdom of God, over which Christ reigns. is present in the church. He is the head of the body: the church (). When he was on earth. his kingdom was present in his disciples’ hearts. And wherever believers today are following the lordship of Christ. the Savior is exercising his ruling or kingly function.
is. The kingdom of God, over which Christ reigns. is present in the church. He is
the head of the body: the church (). When he was on earth. his kingdom
was present in his disciples’ hearts. And wherever believers today are following the
lordship of Christ. the Savior is exercising his ruling or kingly function.
In light of the foregoing. we can see that Jesus Christ‘s rule is not a matter merely of his final exaltation. It is in connection with the final step in his exaltation.
merely of his final exaltation. It is in connection with the final step in his e.\'.'ilt.-1tion.
when he returns in power. that his rule will be complete. The hymn in emphasizes that Christ has been given a “name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father“ (vv 9—,11). A time is coming when all will be under his rule, whether willingly and eagerly; or unwillingly and reluctantly
2- emphasizes that Christ has been given a “name that is above every name, that
at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under
the earth, and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory
of God the Father“ (vv 9—,11). A time is coming when all will be under his rule,
whether willingly and eagerly; or unwillingly and reluctantly
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