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Research on Timothy

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Even in the fifties there were at least two house churches in Ephesus (2

Tim 1:16; 4:19). The size and impact of the church at Ephesus is reflected

by the uproar of the silversmiths (Acts 19:23-40) who would hardly have

reacted so strongly to a minor threat to their sales.

The opponents originated as a judaizing segment of the ritually strict

Hebraioi - the circumcision party of the Jerusalem church (cf Acts 11:2

with Tit 1:10), which combined a demand for Gentile adherence to the Mosaic

regulations and an ascetic ritualism with a zeal for visions of angels and,

at least in the diaspora, gnosticizing tendencies to promote an experience

of a (distorted) divine wisdom and knowledge, and to depreciate matter and

physical resurrection and redemption.

In the pastorals, the gnosticizing judaizers were known as the circumcision

party (Tit 1:10) and continued their claim to be 'teachers of the Law' (1

Tim 1:7) although they apparently no longer stressed, as in Galatians, the

duty of circumcision.

The young man was evidently of a timid disposition, for Paul urges the

Corinthians to set him at ease and not to despise him (1 Cor. 16:10-11; cf.

4:17ff.).[1]

it would seem that Paul left Timothy at Ephesus (1 Tim. 1:3) and

commissioned him to deal with false teachers and supervise public worship

and the appointment of church officials.[2] Although Paul evidently hoped

to rejoin Timothy, the fear that he might be delayed occasioned the writing

of the first letter to him, and this was followed by another when Paul was

not only rearrested but on trial for his life. Timothy was urged to hasten

to him, but whether he arrived in time cannot be ascertained. Later Timothy

himself became a prisoner as Heb. 13:23 shows, but no details are given,

and of his subsequent history nothing definite is known.[3]

He was affectionate (2 Tim. 1:4) but very fearful (2 Tim. 1:7ff.), needing

not a few personal admonitions from his father in the faith; he is warned

not to give way to youthful lusts (2 Tim. 2:22) and not to be ashamed of

the gospel (2 Tim. 1:8). Yet no other of Paul's companions is so warmly

commended for his loyalty (1 Cor. 16:10; Phil. 2:19ff.; 2 Tim. 3:10ff.).[4]

Timothy is heir to a maternal heritage of sincere Christian faith evoked in

the names of his mother Eunice and grandmother Lois (2 Tim 1:5). This

spiritual foundation is imaged in a firm faith rooted in his knowing "the

sacred writings that instruct in salvation" since childhood (2 Tim 3:14-

15). [5]

With his youthfulness we find a vulnerability marked by *"tears" (2 Tim

1:4), but tenderness is no exemption from serving as "a good soldier of

Christ Jesus" (2 Tim 2:3) and "suffering for the gospel" (2 Tim 1:8). [6]

The First Epistle was probably written from Macedonia, a.d. 65, in the

interval between St. Paul's first and second imprisonments at Rome. [7]

The son of a mixed marriage; his mother, who evidently instructed him in

the Scriptures, was a Jewess and his father a Greek (Acts 16:1; 2 Tim.

1:5). He was a native of Lystra (Acts 16:1) and was highly esteemed by his

Christian brethren both there and in Iconium (Acts 16:2). When he became a

Christian is not specifically stated, but it is a reasonable inference that

he was a convert of Paul's first missionary journey, which included Lystra

in its itinerary, and that on that occasion he witnessed Paul's sufferings

(2 Tim. 3:11). It is not certain when Timothy's mother Eunice became a

Christian, perhaps before Timothy, but certainly before Paul's second

missionary journey.[8]

Some men were coming in and spreading the dilution disease. What were these

men like?

. Combined belief in Jesus with following other OT practices

. Created or followed made-up myths and genealogies - possibly rooted in

the OT

. Called themselves Teachers of the Law

. They say that the resurrection had already taken place (2 Timothy

2:18)

. Said people should not marry (1 Timothy 4:3)

. Abstain from certain foods (1 Timothy 4:3)

. Among those who had fallen for this were Hymenaeus and Alexander (1

Timothy 1:20), and Philetus (2 Timothy 2:16-18). Their teaching was

spreading like gangrene (2 Timothy 2:17).

. Motivated by money (1 Timothy 6:3-5; 10)


cf. confer (Lat.), compare

ff. and the following (verses, etc.)

[1]Wood, D. R. W., Wood, D. R. W., & Marshall, I. H. (1996, c1982, c1962).

New Bible Dictionary. Includes index. (electronic ed. of 3rd ed.) (1189).

Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press.

[2]Wood, D. R. W., Wood, D. R. W., & Marshall, I. H. (1996, c1982, c1962).

New Bible Dictionary. Includes index. (electronic ed. of 3rd ed.) (1189).

Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press.

[3]Wood, D. R. W., Wood, D. R. W., & Marshall, I. H. (1996, c1982, c1962).

New Bible Dictionary. Includes index. (electronic ed. of 3rd ed.) (1189).

Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press.

ff. and the following (verses, etc.)

[4]Wood, D. R. W., Wood, D. R. W., & Marshall, I. H. (1996, c1982, c1962).

New Bible Dictionary. Includes index. (electronic ed. of 3rd ed.) (1189).

Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press.

[5]Ryken, L., Wilhoit, J., Longman, T., Duriez, C., Penney, D., & Reid, D.

G. (2000, c1998). Dictionary of biblical imagery (electronic ed.) (872).

Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

[6]Ryken, L., Wilhoit, J., Longman, T., Duriez, C., Penney, D., & Reid, D.

G. (2000, c1998). Dictionary of biblical imagery (electronic ed.) (873).

Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

[7]Smith, W. (1997). Smith's Bible dictionary. Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

[8]Wood, D. R. W., Wood, D. R. W., & Marshall, I. H. (1996, c1982, c1962).

New Bible Dictionary. Includes index. (electronic ed. of 3rd ed.) (1189).

Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press.

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