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Keeping Promises

Fall and Deliverance   •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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God's Faithfulness

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Keeping Promises

Joshua 1:5 KJV 1900
5 There shall not any man be able to stand before thee all the days of thy life: as I was with Moses, so I will be with thee: I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee.
Big Idea - keeping promises .......
God is faithful
Deuteronomy 7:9 KJV 1900
9 Know therefore that the Lord thy God, he is God, the faithful God, which keepeth covenant and mercy with them that love him and keep his commandments to a thousand generations;
Hebrews 6:10 KJV 1900
10 For God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labour of love, which ye have shewed toward his name, in that ye have ministered to the saints, and do minister.
2 Timothy 2:13 KJV 1900
13 If we believe not, yet he abideth faithful: he cannot deny himself.
2 Timothy 2:15 KJV 1900
15 Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.
2 Thessalonians 3:3 KJV 1900
3 But the Lord is faithful, who shall stablish you, and keep you from evil.
Big Idea of the Series:
Big Idea of the Series:
This six-week series tells the story of Israel’s deliverance from Egypt and their journey through the desert into the promised land.
Working backwards through the narrative,
Fall and Deliverance provides a unique vantage point on the ups and downs of Israel’s journey.
This retelling of redemptive history examines God’s faithfulness to us despite our weaknesses, as well as the charge he gives us to live righteously for his name.
Big Idea of the Message: God will keep his promises because he is faithful.
Application Point: We can build up our faith and courage by drawing near to God through reading his Word.
Sermon Ideas and Talking Points:
Keeping promise - they are going in ..... even w/o Moses
They become stuck a number times and repeated their mistakes, but God remained faithful throughout the ordeal. In that same way, if it wasn’t for God’s unfailing love and grace, we would surely be doomed to keep repeating the same mistakes, remaining stuck in our own sin. But just as God delivered the Israelites into the promised land based on his faithfulness to his promises, so also God will show his faithfulness to us in spite of our weaknesses.
Several times in this passage, God commands Joshua to be strong and courageous as he leads the people to finally enter in to their land. God repeats that this courage can be found in believing that he will be with Joshua; he will not leave him or forsake him (1:5, 9). God’s presence made a difference. Tell a personal story about a time someone’s presence helped you overcome a scary situation or when your presence helped someone else be courageous.
God does not need me or you
3. The ark of the covenant symbolized God’s presence on earth during the time of the Old Testament. It was this presence that miraculously pushed back the waters of the Jordan River so the people could cross over (3:9–17).
5. Have someone from your church share her testimony (prepared beforehand) of what reading the Bible regularly on her own has done for her life. What are the tools she has found that work best for her to have meaningful personal study in the Bible? What are her challenges to reading faithfully and how does she overcome them? How has her relationship with God been affected?

I The Passing of the Baton

Joshua’s commission (1:1–9)

1 The opening words announce the death of Moses. It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of Moses to Israel. For forty years he had been their leader in religious, domestic, judicial, military, and civic concerns. With Moses’ death one epoch ended and another began.

Moses’ death separates the Book of Joshua from the Pentateuch, for, obviously, Moses’ leadership had ended. A close relationship to the Pentateuch, however, is maintained because everything Joshua accomplished was the fulfillment of what God had begun with Moses. Observe the many links between Moses and Joshua in this chapter alone (vv.1, 3, 5, 7–8, 13–15, 17).

“Servant of the LORD” is a title of honor shared by Abraham, David, and the Servant of the Lord in Isaiah. (It is used most frequently of Moses: Exod 14:31; Num 12:7–8; Deut 34:5; and thirteen times in Joshua; “my servant” occurs twice.) The term “servant” was used to designate even the highest officials of a king. With the words “The LORD said to Joshua,” leadership is transferred from Moses to Joshua. Joshua was specifically prepared and divinely appointed for this moment (see Introduction; Num 27:15–23 and Deut 3:28; 31:1–8). Joshua is called the “son of Nun” ten times in this book (here, 2:1, 23; 6:6; 14:1; 17:4; 19:49, 51; 21:1; 24:29). Nothing is known about Joshua’s father. Already in the Pentateuch Joshua was called “Moses’ aide” (Exod 24:13; 33:11; Num 11:28). Only at the end of his life was he honored with the title “servant of the LORD” (24:29).

2 Because of his disobedience, Moses was not allowed to lead the people of Israel into the Promised Land (Num 27:12–14). His death was the occasion for God to renew his command for Israel to enter the land. The crossing of the Jordan marked Israel’s entrance to the Promised Land, just as crossing the Red Sea had marked their departure from Egypt. Flood conditions and the presence of the enemy on the other shore made this a formidable undertaking. The land was always considered to be God’s gift to Israel (vv.3, 6, 11, 13, 15, et al.). The promise of the land, which was first given to Abraham in Genesis 12:7, is a major theme throughout patriarchal history and the Exodus, especially in the Book of Deuteronomy. The fulfillment of that promise is one of the major themes in Joshua.

3 In the Hebrew text nearly the same wording is found in vv.3–5a as in Deuteronomy 11:24–25a. This is another of the many ties between Joshua and the Pentateuch, especially Deuteronomy. The author has taken pains to demonstrate that the work of Joshua is the fulfillment of the Pentateuch.

4 The promise in Deuteronomy 11:24 (cf. Deut 1:6–8) is reiterated here, although the territory that Joshua and Israel actually conquered was not nearly so vast. The literal and complete fulfillment of this promise was not experienced by Israel until the reigns of David and Solomon (see 1 Kings 4:21, 24) and then once again in the time of Uzziah and Jeroboam. Though this vast area on both sides of the Jordan was promised to Israel (Deut 11:24), there is another tradition that regards only the land west of the Jordan as the Promised Land. According to this latter tradition, the territory possessed by the two and one-half tribes east of the Jordan lay outside the Promised Land (Josh 22:19). In Deuteronomy 12:10, for example, Moses stated that Israel would arrive at the land God promised them after they had crossed the Jordan. The word “desert” refers to the Negev in the south, and “Lebanon” (lit., “the Lebanon”) refers to the Lebanese mountains. Palestine was referred to as “the Hittite country” by both Egypt and Babylonia even after the Hittites had withdrawn from the area (cf. Judg 1:26; cf. NIV Study Bible, p. 292 n. 1:4). “The Great Sea” is the Mediterranean.

5 The conditions for the promise, “No one will be able to stand up against you,” are stated in vv.6–9. It was Israel’s failure to observe these conditions that caused their humiliating defeat at Ai (7:1–5). God’s promise, “I will be with you,” is most comforting and comprehensive (cf. Deut 31:6–8). The secret of Moses’ success had been God’s presence with him. It would be the secret of Joshua’s success also, and it continues to be the secret of success for the church (cf. Matt 28:19–20). The conditions for this promise are found in vv.7–8 (cf. 7:12). The statement “I will never leave you nor forsake you” is an example of the doubling of synonyms for emphasis, a common feature in this chapter (cf. vv.7–9, 18).

6 The command to be “strong and courageous” is repeated three times in God’s charge to Joshua (vv.6–9) and again in the people’s reply to Joshua (v.18). Perhaps Joshua was intimidated by the greatness of his predecessor Moses and the awesomeness of his own responsibility. For this reason courage is emphasized in the Lord’s charge to him. This passage introduces the two major parts of the book: the conquest of the land (chs. 1–12) and the division of the land (chs. 13–21).

7 “The law my servant Moses gave you” was probably some part or all of the Book of Deuteronomy (cf. Deut 1:5 where the contents of Deuteronomy are specifically called “this law,” and see Deut 31:9–13). The many material and verbal parallels with Deuteronomy show that the author of Joshua was familiar with its contents. The covenant relationship between Israel and God as given at Sinai was contingent on Israel’s obedience to the law. The expression “to the right or to the left” is a vivid way of stating that no deviation would be permitted.

8–9 Verse 8 is the theme verse of Joshua. Throughout the rest of the book, the author draws illustrations from this crucial period in Israel’s history to demonstrate that God blesses his people when they obey him. The book may have been written in a period of apostasy and national disaster in an effort to call the people back to obedience (see Introduction, p. 244). The phrase “from your mouth” refers to the custom of muttering while studying or reflecting. The Hebrew word translated “meditate” (hāg̱āh) literally means “mutter.” When one continually mutters God’s Word to himself, he is constantly thinking about it. Knowledge of God’s law is not enough; one must also “be careful to do” what it commands. Thus the law of God is to control all thought and action. “Everything written in it” must be observed, because obedience to certain parts only is no obedience at all. As the Epistle of James (2:8–13) explains, such a practice shows respect for certain parts of the law only, but not for the Lawgiver.

Joshua 1:1 KJV 1900
1 Now after the death of Moses the servant of the Lord it came to pass, that the Lord spake unto Joshua the son of Nun, Moses’ minister, saying,
It time enter the promised land. But Moses would not go .....
He disobeyed God by striking the Rock for water rather than speaking to it....
Humble and obedience is needed God will get His work done with or with out you or me ....
Deuteronomy 3:24–26 KJV 1900
24 O Lord God, thou hast begun to shew thy servant thy greatness, and thy mighty hand: for what God is there in heaven or in earth, that can do according to thy works, and according to thy might? 25 I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon. 26 But the Lord was wroth with me for your sakes, and would not hear me: and the Lord said unto me, Let it suffice thee; speak no more unto me of this matter.
deut 3.24-
40 years have passed since the rebellion at Kaddish Barnea ...
40 years have passed since the rebellion at Kaddish Barnea ...
None are left except the children of the rebellion and Joshua and Caleb
josuua
The opening words announce the death of Moses. It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of Moses to Israel. For forty years he had been their leader in religious, domestic, judicial, military, and civic concerns. With Moses’ death one epoch ended and another began.
With the words “The LORD said to Joshua,” leadership is transferred from Moses to Joshua.
“Servant of the LORD” is a title of honor shared by Abraham, David, and the Servant of the Lord in Isaiah. (It is used most frequently of Moses: ; ; ; and thirteen times in Joshua; “my servant” occurs twice.) The term “servant” was used to designate even the highest officials of a king.
With the words “The LORD said to Joshua,” leadership is transferred from Moses to Joshua.
Joshua was specifically prepared and divinely appointed for this moment (see Introduction; and ; ).
God keeps His promises to place Israel in tot he promise land

The words, After the death of Moses, link this book with Deuteronomy (cf. Deut. 34:1–9). Before Moses’ death Joshua was designated his successor (cf. Num. 27:15–23; Deut. 3:21–22; 31:1–8). Joshua had been Moses’ young aide for a number of years (Ex. 24:13; 33:11; Num. 11:28). Joshua was from the tribe of Ephraim (Num. 13:8), and lived 110 years (Josh. 24:29).

Joshua may have felt a sense of loneliness, and waited expectantly near the Jordan River to hear the voice of God. He was not disappointed. When God’s servants take time to listen, He always communicates. In the present Age He usually speaks through His written Word. But in the Old Testament He spoke in dreams by night, in visions by day, through the high priest, and occasionally in an audible voice.

Hebrews 12:1 KJV 1900
1 Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,
Genesis 12:1 KJV 1900
1 Now the Lord had said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father’s house, unto a land that I will shew thee:
God had to change leadership but that did not change His promise ....
They were going into the promise land
Deuteronomy 32:51–52 KJV 1900
51 Because ye trespassed against me among the children of Israel at the waters of Meribah-Kadesh, in the wilderness of Zin; because ye sanctified me not in the midst of the children of Israel. 52 Yet thou shalt see the land before thee; but thou shalt not go thither unto the land which I give the children of Israel.
Deuteronomy 32:49–52 KJV 1900
49 Get thee up into this mountain Abarim, unto mount Nebo, which is in the land of Moab, that is over against Jericho; and behold the land of Canaan, which I give unto the children of Israel for a possession: 50 And die in the mount whither thou goest up, and be gathered unto thy people; as Aaron thy brother died in mount Hor, and was gathered unto his people: 51 Because ye trespassed against me among the children of Israel at the waters of Meribah-Kadesh, in the wilderness of Zin; because ye sanctified me not in the midst of the children of Israel. 52 Yet thou shalt see the land before thee; but thou shalt not go thither unto the land which I give the children of Israel.
Deut 3.51-52
deut 32.49-
Joshua had been Moses’ young aide for a number of years (; ; ). Joshua was from the tribe of Ephraim (), and lived 110 years ().
Joshua may have felt a sense of loneliness, and waited expectantly near the Jordan River to hear the voice of God.
He was not disappointed. When God’s servants take time to listen, He always communicates. In the present Age He usually speaks through His written Word. But in the Old Testament He spoke in dreams by night, in visions by day, through the high priest, and occasionally in an audible voice.
Joshua was waiting a humble helper and now it was his turn .....
Joshua was waiting a humble helper and now it was his turn .....
Joshua was waiting a humble helper and now it was his turn .....
Numbers 27:18–19 KJV 1900
18 And the Lord said unto Moses, Take thee Joshua the son of Nun, a man in whom is the spirit, and lay thine hand upon him; 19 And set him before Eleazar the priest, and before all the congregation; and give him a charge in their sight.
Numbers 27:18–20 KJV 1900
18 And the Lord said unto Moses, Take thee Joshua the son of Nun, a man in whom is the spirit, and lay thine hand upon him; 19 And set him before Eleazar the priest, and before all the congregation; and give him a charge in their sight. 20 And thou shalt put some of thine honour upon him, that all the congregation of the children of Israel may be obedient.
nubers 27.18-19
A change of leadership was needed because God keeps His promises ....
What a shame if we never prepare the next generation of leaders.
2 Timothy 2:2 KJV 1900
2 And the things that thou hast heard of me among many witnesses, the same commit thou to faithful men, who shall be able to teach others also.
The next generation will not know the things of God unless we teach and have other by our side.
Judges 2:10 KJV 1900
10 And also all that generation were gathered unto their fathers: and there arose another generation after them, which knew not the Lord, nor yet the works which he had done for Israel.
smooth
practice
trained
must let go ....

II The Place of Victory

Joshua 1:2–5 KJV 1900
2 Moses my servant is dead; now therefore arise, go over this Jordan, thou, and all this people, unto the land which I do give to them, even to the children of Israel. 3 Every place that the sole of your foot shall tread upon, that have I given unto you, as I said unto Moses. 4 From the wilderness and this Lebanon even unto the great river, the river Euphrates, all the land of the Hittites, and unto the great sea toward the going down of the sun, shall be your coast. 5 There shall not any man be able to stand before thee all the days of thy life: as I was with Moses, so I will be with thee: I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee.
God keeps His promise and we finds a place of victory
God tells Joshua that he will Give all the Land under his feet to Him .....
Listen and obey - its is yours in spite of how things look ...
Illustration - Gods promises are real and he will enable you to accomplish what he pleases ...
When God keeps his promises there is a place of victory.
Illustration Place of Victory -
Kids through college - scoffers in my family
A place of Victory
Is where God keeps his promises in-spite of the way it looks
is a testimony to the Greatness of God
Encourage others
His death was the occasion for God to renew his command for Israel to enter the land.
The crossing of the Jordan marked Israel’s entrance to the Promised Land, just as crossing the Red Sea had marked their departure from Egypt.
Flood conditions and the presence of the enemy on the other shore made this a formidable undertaking.

Though the land was God’s gift to Israel, it could be won only by hard fighting. The Lord gave them title to the territory but they had to possess it by marching on every part. The boundaries established by God and promised to Abraham (Gen. 15:18–21) and Moses (Deut. 1:6–8) were to extend from the wilderness on the south to the Lebanon mountain range on the north, and from the Euphrates River on the east to the Great Sea, the Mediterranean, on the west. The added expression, all the Hittite country, probably refers not to the extensive empire of that name north of Canaan but to the fact that in ancient times the whole population of Canaan or any part of it was sometimes called “Hittite” (cf. Gen. 15:20). “Pockets” of Hittite peoples existed here and there in Canaan.

Thirty-eight years earlier Joshua had explored this good and fruitful land as 1 of the 12 spies (Num. 13:1–16; there [Num. 13:8] he is called “Hoshea,” a variant spelling of his name). The memory of its beauty and fertility had not dimmed. Now he was to lead the armies of Israel to conquer that territory.

What is the extent of these boundaries? The territory actually conquered and possessed in the time of Joshua was much less than what was promised in Genesis 15:18–21. Even in the time of David and Solomon, when the land reached its greatest extent, the outlying districts were only within Israel’s sphere of influence.

When will the nation of Israel fully possess the land? The prophets have declared that at the time of Christ’s return to earth He will regather the Jews and reign in the land over a converted and redeemed Israel. Full and complete possession of the land awaits that day (cf. Jer. 16:14–16; Amos 9:11–15; Zech. 8:4–8).

1:5. As Joshua faced the tremendous task of conquering Canaan, he needed a fresh word of encouragement. From personal observation Joshua knew that the Canaanites and others were vigorous people who lived in strongly fortified cities (cf. Num. 13:28–29). Frequent battles kept their warriors in trim fighting condition. And for the most part the land was mountainous, a fact that would make war maneuvers most difficult. But when God gives a command He often accompanies it with a promise, so He assured Joshua a lifetime of continuous victory over his enemies, based on His unfailing presence and help. The words I will never leave you (cf. Josh. 1:9) may be rendered, “I will not drop or abandon you.” God never walks out on His promises.

Though the land was God’s gift to Israel, it could be won only by hard fighting.
The Lord gave them title to the territory but they had to possess it by marching on every part.
The boundaries established by God and promised to Abraham () and Moses () were to extend from the wilderness on the south to the Lebanon mountain range on the north, and from the Euphrates River on the east to the Great Sea, the Mediterranean, on the west.
Thirty-eight years earlier Joshua had explored this good and fruitful land as 1 of the 12 spies (; there [] he is called “Hoshea,” a variant spelling of his name). The memory of its beauty and fertility had not dimmed. Now he was to lead the armies of Israel to conquer that territory.
As Joshua faced the tremendous task of conquering Canaan, he needed a fresh word of encouragement.
When will the nation of Israel fully possess the land? The prophets have declared that at the time of Christ’s return to earth He will regather the Jews and reign in the land over a converted and redeemed Israel. Full and complete possession of the land awaits that day (cf. ; ; ).
As Joshua faced the tremendous task of conquering Canaan, he needed a fresh word of encouragement.
But when God gives a command He often accompanies it with a promise, so He assured Joshua a lifetime of continuous victory over his enemies, based on His unfailing presence and help.
Frequent battles kept their warriors in trim fighting condition. And for the most part the land was mountainous, a fact that would make war maneuvers most difficult.
But when God gives a command He often accompanies it with a promise, so He assured Joshua a lifetime of continuous victory over his enemies, based on His unfailing presence and help.
The words I will never leave you (cf. ) may be rendered, “I will not drop or abandon you.” God never walks out on His promises.
read and exegete vs 3
read and exegete vs 3
The promise in (cf. ) is reiterated here,
The promise in (cf. ) is reiterated here,
4 The promise in (cf. ) is reiterated here, although the territory that Joshua and Israel actually conquered was not nearly so vast. The literal and complete fulfillment of this promise was not experienced by Israel until the reigns of David and Solomon (see , ) and then once again in the time of Uzziah and Jeroboam. Though this vast area on both sides of the Jordan was promised to Israel (), there is another tradition that regards only the land west of the Jordan as the Promised Land. According to this latter tradition, the territory possessed by the two and one-half tribes east of the Jordan lay outside the Promised Land (). In , for example, Moses stated that Israel would arrive at the land God promised them after they had crossed the Jordan. The word “desert” refers to the Negev in the south, and “Lebanon” (lit., “the Lebanon”) refers to the Lebanese mountains. Palestine was referred to as “the Hittite country” by both Egypt and Babylonia even after the Hittites had withdrawn from the area (cf. ; cf. NIV Study Bible, p. 292 n. 1:4). “The Great Sea” is the Mediterranean.
Deuteronomy 11:24 KJV 1900
24 Every place whereon the soles of your feet shall tread shall be yours: from the wilderness and Lebanon, from the river, the river Euphrates, even unto the uttermost sea shall your coast be.
I am excited about the place of victory
vs 5 a declarative statement -
5 The conditions for the promise, “No one will be able to stand up against you,” are stated in vv.6–9. It was Israel’s failure to observe these conditions that caused their humiliating defeat at Ai (7:1–5). God’s promise, “I will be with you,” is most comforting and comprehensive (cf. ). The secret of Moses’ success had been God’s presence with him. It would be the secret of Joshua’s success also, and it continues to be the secret of success for the church (cf. ). The conditions for this promise are found in vv.7–8 (cf. 7:12). The statement “I will never leave you nor forsake you” is an example of the doubling of synonyms for emphasis, a common feature in this chapter (cf. vv.7–9, 18).

As Joshua faced the tremendous task of conquering Canaan, he needed a fresh word of encouragement. From personal observation Joshua knew that the Canaanites and others were vigorous people who lived in strongly fortified cities (cf. Num. 13:28–29). Frequent battles kept their warriors in trim fighting condition. And for the most part the land was mountainous, a fact that would make war maneuvers most difficult. But when God gives a command He often accompanies it with a promise, so He assured Joshua a lifetime of continuous victory over his enemies, based on His unfailing presence and help. The words I will never leave you (cf. Josh. 1:9) may be rendered, “I will not drop or abandon you.” God never walks out on His promises.

III The Provision Identified

From personal observation Joshua knew that the Canaanites and others were vigorous people who lived in strongly fortified cities (cf. ). Frequent battles kept their warriors in trim fighting condition. And for the most part the land was mountainous, a fact that would make war maneuvers most difficult.
But when God gives a command He often accompanies it with a promise, so He assured Joshua a lifetime of continuous victory over his enemies, based on His unfailing presence and help.
The words I will never leave you (cf. ) may be rendered, “I will not drop or abandon you.” God never walks out on His promises.
joshua 1.2
God keeps his promise by proving a provision
be strong vs 6

III The Provision Identified

be strong vs 7
be strong vs 9
How look at
Joshua 1:7 KJV 1900
7 Only be thou strong and very courageous, that thou mayest observe to do according to all the law, which Moses my servant commanded thee: turn not from it to the right hand or to the left, that thou mayest prosper whithersoever thou goest.
Joshua 1:8 KJV 1900
8 This book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do according to all that is written therein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success.
The provision is God word ......
The Strength does not come in
The Army
The Soldiers
The plans
The courage
It come from obedience......
Joshua 1:8 KJV 1900
8 This book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do according to all that is written therein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success.
observe
Several times in this passage, God commands Joshua to be strong and courageous as he leads the people to finally enter in to their land. God repeats that this courage can be found in believing that he will be with Joshua; he will not leave him or forsake him (1:5, 9). God’s presence made a difference.
Joshua 1:6–9 KJV 1900
6 Be strong and of a good courage: for unto this people shalt thou divide for an inheritance the land, which I sware unto their fathers to give them. 7 Only be thou strong and very courageous, that thou mayest observe to do according to all the law, which Moses my servant commanded thee: turn not from it to the right hand or to the left, that thou mayest prosper whithersoever thou goest. 8 This book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do according to all that is written therein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success. 9 Have not I commanded thee? Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest.
joshua 1.
Several times in this passage, God commands Joshua to be strong and courageous as he leads the people to finally enter in to their land. God repeats that this courage can be found in believing that he will be with Joshua; he will not leave him or forsake him (1:5, 9). God’s presence made a difference.
Joshua’s commission (1:1–9)
Moses’ death separates the Book of Joshua from the Pentateuch, for, obviously, Moses’ leadership had ended. A close relationship to the Pentateuch, however, is maintained because everything Joshua accomplished was the fulfillment of what God had begun with Moses. Observe the many links between Moses and Joshua in this chapter alone (vv.1, 3, 5, 7–8, 13–15, 17).
“Servant of the LORD” is a title of honor shared by Abraham, David, and the Servant of the Lord in Isaiah. (It is used most frequently of Moses: ; ; ; and thirteen times in Joshua; “my servant” occurs twice.) The term “servant” was used to designate even the highest officials of a king. With the words “The LORD said to Joshua,” leadership is transferred from Moses to Joshua. Joshua was specifically prepared and divinely appointed for this moment (see Introduction; and ; ). Joshua is called the “son of Nun” ten times in this book (here, 2:1, 23; 6:6; 14:1; 17:4; 19:49, 51; 21:1; 24:29). Nothing is known about Joshua’s father. Already in the Pentateuch Joshua was called “Moses’ aide” (; ; ). Only at the end of his life was he honored with the title “servant of the LORD” (24:29).

Flowing from this strong affirmation that God would never let Joshua down was God’s threefold call to courage. First, Joshua was commanded to be strong and courageous (cf. vv. 7, 9, 18) because of God’s promise of the land. Strength and fortitude would be required for the strenuous military campaign just ahead, but Joshua was to keep uppermost in his mind the fact that he would succeed in causing Israel to inherit the land because it had been promised to their forefathers, that is, to Abraham (Gen. 13:14–17; 15:18–21; 17:7–8; 22:16–18), Isaac (Gen. 26:3–5), Jacob (Gen. 28:13; 35:12), and the entire nation, the seed of Abraham (Ex. 6:8), as an eternal possession. And Joshua now at last was to lead the children of Israel into possession of this Promised Land. What a strategic role he was to play at this crucial time in his nation’s history!

While in any given generation the fulfillment of this great and significant promise depends on Israel’s obedience to God, there can be no question that the Bible affirms her right to the land. By divine contract the title is hers even though she will not possess it totally and enjoy it fully until she is right with God.

1:7–8. Second, Joshua was again commanded to be strong and very courageous, being careful to obey all the Law of Moses. This command is based on God’s power through His Word. This is a stronger exhortation, indicating that greater strength of character would be required to obey God’s Word faithfully and fully than to win military battles! The emphasis in these verses is clearly on a written body of truth. Many critics argue that the Scriptures did not appear in written form until several centuries later but here is a clear reference to an authoritative Book of the Law.

To enjoy prosperity and be … successful in the Conquest of Canaan Joshua was to do three things with regard to the Scriptures: (a) The Law was not to depart from his mouth; he was to talk about it (cf. Deut. 6:7); (b) He was to meditate on it day and night, to think about it (cf. Ps. 1:2; 119:97); (c) He was to do everything written in it, to obey its commands fully and to act by it (cf. Ezra 7:10; James 1:22–25).

Joshua’s life demonstrates that in a practical way he lived according to the teachings of the Law of Moses, the only portion of the Word of God then in written form. This alone explains the victories he achieved in battle and the success that marked his entire career. In one of his farewell addresses to the nation just before he died he urged the people to live in submission to the Scriptures (Josh. 23:6). Tragically they heeded this charge for only a short time. In succeeding generations the people of Israel refused to be guided by God’s authoritative revelation, and they all did what they chose (Jud. 21:25). Rejecting an objective standard of righteousness, they chose a subjective one characterized by moral and spiritual relativism. This in turn plunged the nation into centuries of religious apostasy and moral anarchy.

1:9. The third call to courage addressed to Joshua was based on the promise of God’s presence. This did not minimize the task Joshua faced. He would encounter giants and fortified cities, but God’s presence would make all the difference.

Joshua probably had times when he felt weak, inadequate, and frightened. Perhaps he considered resigning before the Conquest even began. But God knew all about his feelings of personal weakness and fear and told Joshua three times, Be strong and courageous (vv. 6–7, 9; cf. v. 18). God also urged him not to be afraid or discouraged (cf. Deut. 1:21; 31:8; Josh. 8:1). These charges with their accompanying assurances (God’s promise, God’s power, and God’s presence) were sufficient to last a lifetime. Believers in all ages can be uplifted by the same three assurances.

3 In the Hebrew text nearly the same wording is found in vv.3–5a as in . This is another of the many ties between Joshua and the Pentateuch, especially Deuteronomy. The author has taken pains to demonstrate that the work of Joshua is the fulfillment of the Pentateuch.
Flowing from this strong affirmation that God would never let Joshua down was God’s threefold call to courage.
4 The promise in (cf. ) is reiterated here, although the territory that Joshua and Israel actually conquered was not nearly so vast. The literal and complete fulfillment of this promise was not experienced by Israel until the reigns of David and Solomon (see , ) and then once again in the time of Uzziah and Jeroboam. Though this vast area on both sides of the Jordan was promised to Israel (), there is another tradition that regards only the land west of the Jordan as the Promised Land. According to this latter tradition, the territory possessed by the two and one-half tribes east of the Jordan lay outside the Promised Land (). In , for example, Moses stated that Israel would arrive at the land God promised them after they had crossed the Jordan. The word “desert” refers to the Negev in the south, and “Lebanon” (lit., “the Lebanon”) refers to the Lebanese mountains. Palestine was referred to as “the Hittite country” by both Egypt and Babylonia even after the Hittites had withdrawn from the area (cf. ; cf. NIV Study Bible, p. 292 n. 1:4). “The Great Sea” is the Mediterranean.
First, Joshua was commanded to be strong and courageous (cf. vv. 7, 9, 18) because of God’s promise of the land.
1)Strength to take the land vs 6
Strength and fortitude would be required for the strenuous military campaign just ahead, but Joshua was to keep uppermost in his mind the fact that he would succeed in causing Israel to inherit the land because it had been promised to their forefathers, that is, to Abraham (; ; ; ), Isaac (), Jacob (; ), and the entire nation, the seed of Abraham (), as an eternal possession.
And Joshua now at last was to lead the children of Israel into possession of this Promised Land. What a strategic role he was to play at this crucial time in his nation’s history!
2) Strength to obey the Word vs and 8
This command is based on God’s power through His Word. This is a stronger exhortation, indicating that greater strength of character would be required to obey God’s Word faithfully and fully than to win military battles!
5 The conditions for the promise, “No one will be able to stand up against you,” are stated in vv.6–9. It was Israel’s failure to observe these conditions that caused their humiliating defeat at Ai (7:1–5). God’s promise, “I will be with you,” is most comforting and comprehensive (cf. ). The secret of Moses’ success had been God’s presence with him. It would be the secret of Joshua’s success also, and it continues to be the secret of success for the church (cf. ). The conditions for this promise are found in vv.7–8 (cf. 7:12). The statement “I will never leave you nor forsake you” is an example of the doubling of synonyms for emphasis, a common feature in this chapter (cf. vv.7–9, 18).
1:7–8. Second, Joshua was again commanded to be strong and very courageous, being careful to obey all the Law of Moses. This command is based on God’s power through His Word. This is a stronger exhortation, indicating that greater strength of character would be required to obey God’s Word faithfully and fully than to win military battles! The emphasis in these verses is clearly on a written body of truth. Many critics argue that the Scriptures did not appear in written form until several centuries later but here is a clear reference to an authoritative Book of the Law.
Joshua was to do three things with regard to the Scriptures:
7 “The law my servant Moses gave you” was probably some part or all of the Book of Deuteronomy (cf. where the contents of Deuteronomy are specifically called “this law,” and see ). The many material and verbal parallels with Deuteronomy show that the author of Joshua was familiar with its contents. The covenant relationship between Israel and God as given at Sinai was contingent on Israel’s obedience to the law. The expression “to the right or to the left” is a vivid way of stating that no deviation would be permitted.
(a) The Law was not to depart from his mouth; he was to talk about it (cf. );
(b) He was to meditate on it day and night, to think about it (cf. ; );
(c) He was to do everything written in it, to obey its commands fully and to act by it (cf. ; ).
8–9 Verse 8 is the theme verse of Joshua. Throughout the rest of the book, the author draws illustrations from this crucial period in Israel’s history to demonstrate that God blesses his people when they obey him. The book may have been written in a period of apostasy and national disaster in an effort to call the people back to obedience (see Introduction, p. 244). The phrase “from your mouth” refers to the custom of muttering while studying or reflecting. The Hebrew word translated “meditate” (hāg̱āh) literally means “mutter.” When one continually mutters God’s Word to himself, he is constantly thinking about it. Knowledge of God’s law is not enough; one must also “be careful to do” what it commands. Thus the law of God is to control all thought and action. “Everything written in it” must be observed, because obedience to certain parts only is no obedience at all. As the Epistle of James (2:8–13) explains, such a practice shows respect for certain parts of the law only, but not for the Lawgiver.
Joshua’s life demonstrates that in a practical way he lived according to the teachings of the Law of Moses, the only portion of the Word of God then in written form. This alone explains the victories he achieved in battle and the success that marked his entire career. In one of his farewell addresses to the nation just before he died he urged the people to live in submission to the Scriptures ().
Joshua 23:6 KJV 1900
6 Be ye therefore very courageous to keep and to do all that is written in the book of the law of Moses, that ye turn not aside therefrom to the right hand or to the left;
3) Strength to Know he is not alone vs 9
The third call to courage addressed to Joshua was based on the promise of God’s presence. This did not minimize the task Joshua faced. He would encounter giants and fortified cities, but God’s presence would make all the difference.
1:9. The third call to courage addressed to Joshua was based on the promise of God’s presence. This did not minimize the task Joshua faced. He would encounter giants and fortified cities, but God’s presence would make all the difference.
Joshua probably had times when he felt weak, inadequate, and frightened. Perhaps he considered resigning before the Conquest even began.
But God knew all about his feelings of personal weakness and fear and told Joshua three times, Be strong and courageous (vv. 6–7, 9; cf. v. 18). God also urged him not to be afraid or discouraged (cf. ; ; ). These charges with their accompanying assurances (God’s promise, God’s power, and God’s presence) were sufficient to last a lifetime. Believers in all ages can be uplifted by the same three assurances.
God keeps his promises by providing a provision
God keeps His promises with obedient leaders
God keep his promises by giving us a place of Victory
God Keeps His promised by provision of Himself and God’s Word.
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