Faithlife Sermons

My Net Over You

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 1 view
Notes & Transcripts

INTRODUCTION

Emmanuel Baptist Church
August 12, 2018

INTRODUCTION

“But I don’t like it.” That’s what my children say when Cheryl and I put something on their plates they don’t want to eat. Cheryl and I usually respond in the same way, “Well, we aren’t going to be eating later, so you better eat what’s on your plate.”
Sometimes they do. Sometimes they don’t.
“I don’t like it,” is also the attitude that some people take toward the wrath of God. I find this humorous because even if you say, “I don’t like it,” it’s still on your plate. You still have to deal with it. Saying you don’t like the idea of the wrath of God is like saying you don’t like the idea of being eaten by a bear.
You may not like the idea of being eaten by a bear, but you better believe that it is a reality that some have experienced and that you could experience as well if you were to go hiking in the mountains.
We may not like the idea of God’s wrath, but we better believe that it is a reality that some have experience and that we could experience as well if we were to die apart from faith in Christ.
We may not like it, but hundreds of biblical passages talk about the wrath of God. The KJV of says that “God is angry with the wicked every day.” At the beginning of Nahum, which is God’s word against the Assyrian capital, Nineveh, we are given an introduction to God’s wrath in ...
Nahum 1:2–8 ESV
The Lord is a jealous and avenging God; the Lord is avenging and wrathful; the Lord takes vengeance on his adversaries and keeps wrath for his enemies. The Lord is slow to anger and great in power, and the Lord will by no means clear the guilty. His way is in whirlwind and storm, and the clouds are the dust of his feet. He rebukes the sea and makes it dry; he dries up all the rivers; Bashan and Carmel wither; the bloom of Lebanon withers. The mountains quake before him; the hills melt; the earth heaves before him, the world and all who dwell in it. Who can stand before his indignation? Who can endure the heat of his anger? His wrath is poured out like fire, and the rocks are broken into pieces by him. The Lord is good, a stronghold in the day of trouble; he knows those who take refuge in him. But with an overflowing flood he will make a complete end of the adversaries, and will pursue his enemies into darkness.
You probably heard it in , “The LORD is slow to anger...” We usually think of this as good news, but it isn’t good news once God is angry.
There is an entry on the "God’s Wrath” in the Shaw Pocket Bible Handbook, which gives an example of it. It says “there is a Greek verb that can be used both of anger and of the swelling of buds as the sap rises.”
It goes on to say, “It points to the kind of anger that results from a settled and consistent disposition...”
The Lord is slow to wrath, but once it erupts, it burns hot. Pharaoh is about to learn this.
[CONTEXT] In God revealed the pride of Pharaoh and his settled response to it. That response is, of course, wrath.
Pharaoh thinks of himself as a mighty monster in the oceans, a dragon in the seas, a great crocodile in the river Nile. He thrashes about, churning the waters, and muddying the streams, but in the end its all show and no substance. It’s pride without punch; bravado without bite.
Pharaoh thought he could rescue Judah from the Babylonian army, which was the rod of God’s discipline against the rebellion of Judah. Thus, Pharaoh was attempting to rescue Judah from God.
For pridefully thrashing about, churning the waters, and muddying the streams of God’s discipline against his people, [CIT] God’s wrath would destroy Pharaoh. That’s what he promises in this chapter of Scripture through his prophet Ezekiel.
because God’s wrath is going to destroy Pharaoh.
[PROP] If we are wise, we realize that only God can save from God. If we would be saved, we must repent of our pride and humble ourselves before the Son of God, Jesus Christ, who took God’s wrath in our place.
[TS] We’re going to see three CHARACTERISTICS of the wrath of God in vv. 3-8 tonight; three CHARACTERISTICS that call us to repentance...

MAJOR IDEAS

#1: The Wrath of God is Personal

[EXP] Because sin is a personal offense, God is personally involved in pouring out his wrath on those who sin against him and refuse to repent. We see this in several ways in this passage of Scripture…
Notice how many times God refers to himself as personally involved in the wrath that is coming to Pharaoh in the form of the Babylonian army.
a. Notice how many times God refers to himself as personally involved in the wrath that is coming to Pharaoh in the form of the Babylonian army.
Verse 3, “I will throw my net over you.”
i. Verse 3, “I will throw my net over you.”
Verse 4, “I will cast you on the ground.”
ii. Verse 4, “I will cast you on the ground.”
Verse 4, “On the open field I will fling you.”
iii. Verse 4, “On the open field I will fling you.”
Verse 4, “and (I) will cause all the birds of the heavens to settle on you.”
iv. Verse 4, “and (I) will cause all the birds of the heavens to settle on you.”
Verse 4, “and I will gorge the beasts of the whole earth with you.”
v. Verse 4, “and I will gorge the beasts of the whole earth with you.”
Verse 5, “I will strew your flesh upon the mountains.”
vi. Verse 5, “I will strew your flesh upon the mountains.”
Verse 5, “and (I will) fill the valleys with your carcass.”
vii. Verse 5, “and (I will) fill the valleys with your carcass.”
Verse 6, “I will drench the land even to the mountains with your flowing blood…”
viii. Verse 6, “I will drench the land even to the mountains with your flowing blood…”
Verse 7, “when I blot you out, I will cover the heavens…”
ix. Verse 7, “when I blot you out, I will cover the heavens…”
Verse 7, “I will cover the sun.”
x. Verse 7, “I will cover the sun.”
Verse 8, “All the bright lights of heaven will I make dark over you…”
xi. Verse 8, “All the bright lights of heaven will I make dark over you…”
Whether Pharoah knew it or not, he was in a personal dispute with Almighty God, and Almighty God was personally pouring out his wrath on Pharaoh.
· Whether Pharoah knew it or not, he was in a personal dispute with Almighty God, and Almighty God was personally pouring out his wrath on Pharaoh.
[APP] We might think that Pharaoh was special because he was a ruler and that’s why his sin warranted such a personal response from God.
[APP] We might think that Pharaoh was special because he was a ruler and that’s why his sin warranted such a personal response from God.
2. [App] We might think that Pharaoh was special because he was a ruler and that’s why his sin warranted such a personal response from God.
That’s true as it regards this chapter of Scripture, but there is coming a day when God will perosnally address the sins of every person who refuses to repent just as he personally addressed Pharaoh’s sin in this passage.
That’s true as it regards this chapter of Scripture, but there is coming a day when God will perosnally address the sins of every person who refuses to repent just as he personally addressed Pharaoh’s sin in this passage.
a. That’s true as it regards this chapter of Scripture, but there is coming a day when God will perosnally address the sins of every person who refuses to repent just as he personally addressed Pharaoh’s sin in this passage.
says there is coming a Day of Judgement so personal that God will “judge the secrets of men by Christ Jesus.”
i. says there is coming a Day of Judgement so personal that God will “judge the secrets of men by Christ Jesus.”
says that Jesus has been personally appointed to judge the world in righteousness.
ii. says that Jesus has been personally appointed to judge the world in righteousness.
says that “we all must appear (and surely that is a personal appearance) before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each one may receive what is due for what he has done in the body, whether good or evil.”
iii. says that “we all must appear (and surely that is a personal appearance) before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each one may receive what is due for what he has done in the body, whether good or evil.”
gives us a picture of the judgment before the great white throne of Christ. Twice we are told in that passage that people will be judged according to what they have done (vv. 12, 13).
iv. gives us a picture of the judgment before the great white throne of Christ.
· Twice we are told in that passage that people will be judged according to what they have done (vv. 12, 13).
Actions are personal but names even more so and so we see the personal nature of God’s judgment in
· Actions are personal but names even more so and so we see the personal nature of God’s judgment in
[] And if anyone’s name was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire.
[] And if anyone’s name was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire.
All of this points to a personal accounting before God if we refuse to repent and trust Christ – a personal accounting that will not go well for us.
b. All of this points to a personal accounting before God if we refuse to repent and trust Christ – a personal accounting that will not go well for us.
I will stand before God personally.
i. I will stand before God personally.
My deeds will be recounted.
ii. My deeds will be recounted.
My name will be missing… if I refuse to repent and trust Christ.
iii. My name will be missing… if I refuse to repent and trust Christ.
But what about those we have opportunity to share Christ with?
c. But what about those we have opportunity to share Christ with?
Remembering that they too will personally answer to God may move us to personally care for them as we share the gospel with them.
i. Remembering that they too will personally answer to God may move us to personally care for them as we share the gospel with them.
We should remember that the individual we are sharing with will personally stand before God.
ii. We should remember that the individual we are sharing with will personally stand before God.
His or her deeds recounted.
iii. His or her deeds recounted.
His or her name missing from the book of life… if there is repentance from sin and faith in Christ.
iv. His or her name missing from the book of life… if there is repentance from sin and faith in Christ.
[TS] #1: The Wrath of God is Personal.
3. [TS] #1: The Wrath of God is Personal.

#2: The Wrath of God Humbles. It is humiliating.

[EXP] We see the humiliating nature of God’s wrath in a few different descriptions in vv. 3-8.
a. First, in verse 3, God says that he will haul Pharoah up “with a host of many peoples.”
First, in verse 3, God says that he will haul Pharoah up “with a host of many peoples.”
Pharaoh considered himself a lion of the nations – a leader of the human race – but a net of people from the nations will capture.
i. Pharaoh considered himself a lion of the nations – a leader of the human race – but a net of people from the nations will capture.
Apparently Pharaoh is not the leader of men he once thought.
ii. Apparently Pharaoh is not the leader of men he once thought.
Next, in verse 4, God says that he will “cast (Pharoah) on the ground.”
Next, in verse 4, God says that he will “cast (Pharoah) on the ground.”
i. In the water, Pharoah, the crocodile or dragon, felt powerful as he trashed about in the water, but God will make him feel weakness as he drags him out of the water onto dry ground.
In the water, Pharoah, the crocodile or dragon, felt powerful as he trashed about in the water, but God will make him feel weakness as he drags him out of the water onto dry ground.
c. Also in verse 4, God says that he will “cause all the birds of the heavens to settle on (Pharoah), and (God) will gorge the beasts of the whole earth with (Pharoah).”
Also in verse 4, God says that he will “cause all the birds of the heavens to settle on (Pharoah), and (God) will gorge the beasts of the whole earth with (Pharoah).”
Pharaoh saw the nations as feasting in the safety of his glorious shadow, but now the nations will feast on him.
i. Pharaoh saw the nations as feasting in the safety of his glorious shadow, but now the nations will feast on him.
ii. This is most unglorious for one who thought himself most glorious.
This is most unglorious for one who thought himself most glorious.
d.Verses 5-6 uses the phrase “will be full of you.”
Verses 5-6 uses the phrase “will be full of you.”
i. Pharaoh was full of himself; now, under the wrath of God, the mountains, valleys, and ravines will be full of Pharoah.
Pharaoh was full of himself; now, under the wrath of God, the mountains, valleys, and ravines will be full of Pharoah.
e. Verses 7-8 talk about God blotting Pharaoh out as well as “all the bright lights of heaven.”
Verses 7-8 talk about God blotting Pharaoh out as well as “all the bright lights of heaven.”
refers to David, Israel’s second king, as the “lamp (or light) of Israel.” There’s no doubt that Pharoah would’ve thought of himself as the light of the world.
i. refers to David, Israel’s second king, as the “lamp (or light) of Israel.” There’s no doubt that Pharoah would’ve thought of himself as the light of the world.
Under the wrath of God, however, he will be plunged into darkness.
ii. Under the wrath of God, however, he will be plunged into darkness.
2. [App] What does the wrath of God do? At least one thing it does is show us who we really are.
[APP] What does the wrath of God do? At least one thing it does is show us who we really are.
Pharoah was always in darkness even when he thought of himself as enlightened.
a. Pharoah was always in darkness even when he thought of himself as enlightened.
He was always in darkness even before that become obvious to him on the day of God’s wrath.
i. He was always in darkness even before that become obvious to him on the day of God’s wrath.
b. If the sin is pride (and it is) and God’s response is wrath, it stands to reason that God’s wrath would result in humiliation… but it can result in humility if one repents.
If the sin is pride (and it is) and God’s response is wrath, it stands to reason that God’s wrath would result in humiliation… but it can result in humility if one repents.
i. The difference between humiliation and humility is the difference between now and later.
The difference between humiliation and humility is the difference between now and later.
If we admit our sin and repent by turning to God through faith in Christ now, then we will be humbled by the grace of God.
ii. If we admit our sin and repent by turning to God through faith in Christ now, then we will be humbled by the grace of God.
iii. But if we refuse to admit our sin and repent; if we reject the offer of salvation in Jesus Christ, then we will be humiliated by the wrath of God.
But if we refuse to admit our sin and repent; if we reject the offer of salvation in Jesus Christ, then we will be humiliated by the wrath of God.
c. Will we humble ourselves before him through faith in Christ or will we be humiliated on the day wrath?
Will we humble ourselves before him through faith in Christ or will we be humiliated on the day wrath?
[TS] #2: The Wrath of God is Humiliating
3. [TS] #2: The Wrath of God is Humiliating

#3: The Wrath of God is Actual

[EXP] This should go without saying, but everything that God said would happen to Pharoah happened to Pharoah.
1. [Exp] This should go without saying, but everything that God said would happen to Pharoah happened to Pharoah.
This is certified with the words “Thus says the Lord God” in v. 3 and the words “declares the Lord God” in v. 8.
a. This is certified with the words “Thus says the Lord God” in v. 3 and the words “declares the Lord God” in v. 8.
i. Whatever God says, he does.
Whatever God says, he does.
The language that’s used here in may be symbolic or metaphorical but the judgment described is actual.
b. The language that’s used here in may be symbolic or metaphorical but the judgment described is actual.
i. And, actually, the judgment that is described is just the earthly physical judgment that Pharoah will experience before the eternal spiritual-physical judgment that awaits him in hell.
And, actually, the judgment that is described is just the earthly physical judgment that Pharoah will experience before the eternal spiritual-physical judgment that awaits him in hell.
The metaphorical language doesn’t descibe a less horrible thing in more horrible terms just to make a point.
ii. The metaphorical language doesn’t descibe a less horrible thing in more horrible terms just to make a point.
iii. No, the actual will be more horrible than the metaphorical.
No, the actual will be more horrible than the metaphorical.
The metaphorical language of God’s wrath used in this passage and in other passages in the Bible make understandable a horror that is beyond our comprehension.
iv. The metaphorical language of God’s wrath used in this passage and in other passages in the Bible make understandble a horror that is beyond our comprehension.
· The wrath of God is worse that we can imagine.
The wrath of God is worse that we can imagine.
[TS] {see below}

CONCLUSION

Related Media
Related Sermons