Faithlife Sermons

Source of Unity pt.2

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Put into practice

Philippians 2:12–13 AV 1873
12 Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. 13 For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure.

Put into practice

Work in verse 13 is "energizes."
Because of the unity we find in being of the same mind as Christ, we are called to continue forward in our Christian walk.
Because of the unity we find in being of the same mind as Christ, we are called to continue forward in our Christian walk.
Paul makes sure they know, he loves them and commends their consistent Christian lives. He then exhorts them to continue. Because of the unity we find in being of the same mind as Christ, we are called to continue forward in our Christian walk.

This verse summarizes the various calls to action that Paul has given the Philippians: to walk in a manner worthy of the gospel (1:27), to be like-minded (2:2), and to consider others more important (2:3). Verse 12 focuses on the manner in which these actions should be implemented: with fear and trembling. Working out salvation here is referring to the practical matters of following the Lord and allowing Him to work through you. This is stressed in the very next verse, which answers why we should do this with fear and trembling: because God is the one working in us, not we ourselves (see Eph 2:10).

All believers are called on to live out the salvation God has worked in them—to progress in their spiritual maturity.

Philippians 2:14–16 AV 1873
14 Do all things without murmurings and disputings: 15 that ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world; 16 holding forth the word of life; that I may rejoice in the day of Christ, that I have not run in vain, neither laboured in vain.

Work in verse 13 is ἐνεργέω = "energizes."

Philippians 4:13 AV 1873
13 I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.
We are all called to live beyond our sin and for God's Glory.
John 15:5 AV 1873
5 I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing.

These verses actually argue the same point: apart from God working in us, we cannot accomplish anything of lasting value. This doesn’t mean we should treat God like a power source or means of inspiration; God needs to be the one working in us. When He is, all things are indeed possible, but only because of His involvement.

When things get out of whack, how do I regain an accurate understanding of who God is and who I am? The best place to start is reading Scripture. It renews our understanding of who He is and what He has done. Although we were once God’s enemies, He has delivered us out of darkness into His marvelous light (1 Pet 2:9). Here’s the key to making a change: restore a right view of God and who you are in light of Christ’s work.

Personal Edification ()

We are all called to live beyond our sin and for God's Glory.
Philippians 2:14–16 AV 1873
14 Do all things without murmurings and disputings: 15 that ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world; 16 holding forth the word of life; that I may rejoice in the day of Christ, that I have not run in vain, neither laboured in vain.
Phil. 2:14-
"ALL:" Everything a believer does
"Murmering:" is a bad attitude expressed in grumbling.
V. 15 This was written because these Christians were not without blame among the nation, they were not shining like stars.
Blameless: with out spot, nothing sticks. Tephlon John.
Harmless:

When the suffering that Paul tells us to expect comes along, we shouldn’t play the victim decrying the lack of fairness. If God sets something before us, we’re expected to do it without talking back or drawing attention to the downsides. Why give such a command? There is no greater joy-robber than grumbling and complaining. Remember the Israelites in the wilderness and all their grumbling? It coincided with stubborn rejection of God’s provision for them. Rejoicing and working without grumble or complaint are inextricably related.

Philippians 2:15–16 AV 1873
15 that ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world; 16 holding forth the word of life; that I may rejoice in the day of Christ, that I have not run in vain, neither laboured in vain.

In Paul’s mind, these calls to specific behavior are about shining God’s light in a dark and dying world. Not only will obedience draw us closer to God and help us experience His blessing, it also accomplishes God’s larger purpose.

Matthew 10:16 AV 1873
16 Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.
Matthew 10:16 AV 1873
16 Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.

The Greek word epechontes, hold out (v. 16) means either “hold forth” or “hold firmly.” The former fits better here. It was used in secular Greek of offering wine to a guest at a banquet.

Philippians 2:14–16 AV 1873
Do all things without murmurings and disputings: that ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world; holding forth the word of life; that I may rejoice in the day of Christ, that I have not run in vain, neither laboured in vain.
Are you holding out the light of God's work in your life?

Profound Joy and fulfillment (Phil 2:17-18)

Philippians 2:17–18 AV 1873
17 Yea, and if I be offered upon the sacrifice and service of your faith, I joy, and rejoice with you all. 18 For the same cause also do ye joy, and rejoice with me.
Philippians 1:21 AV 1873
21 For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.
All leads back to verse 2. Fulfill ye my joy.
All leads back to verse 2. Fulfill ye my joy.

Examples of the believer’s life

Philippians 2:19–24 AV 1873
19 But I trust in the Lord Jesus to send Timotheus shortly unto you, that I also may be of good comfort, when I know your state. 20 For I have no man likeminded, who will naturally care for your state. 21 For all seek their own, not the things which are Jesus Christ’s. 22 But ye know the proof of him, that, as a son with the father, he hath served with me in the gospel. 23 Him therefore I hope to send presently, so soon as I shall see how it will go with me. 24 But I trust in the Lord that I also myself shall come shortly.
PHil. 2:19-

Although it might seem at this point that we’re reading someone else’s private correspondence, Paul accomplishes much more here than updating the Philippians on his plans. Paul begins by praising Timothy for the qualities that have made him an invaluable member of his team. But more than just giving Timothy a well-deserved pat on the back, Paul accomplishes something in addition: holding up Timothy as a model for other believers.

As Paul reiterates his main goal of sending Timothy after a series of supporting statements, he phrases it in such a way that the readers would have known from the beginning of the verse that some other related element was coming. It would be just like me saying, “While I think you’re a nice person.…” Adding “while” signals that some related element will follow, with the added notion in English that the other thing is negative. There is no negative overtone in Greek. What is the second thing that Paul builds anticipation for? His conviction that he too will be coming to the Philippians soon. It is difficult to maintain in translation the anticipation that was intended in the Greek. One could capture the sense by saying, “While/although I hope to send him soon, I am convinced in the Lord that I too will arrive shortly.”

Phil. 2:25-30
Philippians 2:25–30 AV 1873
25 Yet I supposed it necessary to send to you Epaphroditus, my brother, and companion in labour, and fellowsoldier, but your messenger, and he that ministered to my wants. 26 For he longed after you all, and was full of heaviness, because that ye had heard that he had been sick. 27 For indeed he was sick nigh unto death: but God had mercy on him; and not on him only, but on me also, lest I should have sorrow upon sorrow. 28 I sent him therefore the more carefully, that, when ye see him again, ye may rejoice, and that I may be the less sorrowful. 29 Receive him therefore in the Lord with all gladness; and hold such in reputation: 30 because for the work of Christ he was nigh unto death, not regarding his life, to supply your lack of service toward me.
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