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Never Charge God with Folly

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There are 3 Tests Job faces:
The test of Wealth - Loss of wealth seeks to rob him of his confidence in God.
The test of Health - Loss of health seeks to rob him of his trust in God.
The test of Stealth - His friends sneak try to rob him of his faith and integrity.
1:22 Antecedent to “this” are the calamities of vv. 13–19. Any one of those events might have caused lesser men to lose faith, abandon hope, or even charge God with neglect or deliberate evil. The “sin” that Job did not commit was to accuse God of “wrongdoing.” He did indirectly acknowledge that God had sent these troubles, but he did not at this point question God’s justice, love, wisdom, or sovereignty. It is a rare and commendable posture that the hero from Uz assumed, one that should characterize all God’s children whatever turns life might take.
Thus the chapter ends with “the greatest man among all the people of the East” destitute, childless, and broken. In the space of less than a page and in a brief span of time, he went from being the greatest to being the least of men. We the readers know something that Job did not, and so we cannot enter into his sorrow. Like God, we know the end from the beginning. We know all about the fact that Job had been chosen as a test case. Because of his godliness God selected him for this trial. Job was unaware that his troubles were a great honor. Would Job remain faithful? Will we?
3. Test of Health (2:1–10)
There are 4 catastrophes in Chapter One:
A number of similarities exist between this chapter and the preceding one. Verses 1–3a are nearly identical to 1:6–8. corresponds with 2:6, and 1:22 corresponds with 2:10c. In these ten verses Job’s testing intensifies. Up to this point he has lost his possessions and his children. Now he would lose his health, which the Satan hoped would break his will and prompt him to curse his God. These two tests together produce yet other losses that we will note in the course of the debate cycle: honor, respect, standing in the community, friendships, and even the support of his wife and brothers (12:4; 16:10; 19:13–19; 30:1, 9–10).
Theft of oxen and donkeys (1:
There are four catastrophes:
1st and 3rd are people related disasters
2nd and 4th are nature related disasters
All of these disasters befell Job in the course of one feast (vv. 13, and 18)
First disaster
Job 1:13 KJV 1900
13 And there was a day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother’s house:
Last disaster
Job 1:18 KJV 1900
18 While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, Thy sons and thy daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother’s house:
All four were caused by Satan
All four were permitted by God
The implication is that Job lost everything…v. 21
Job 1:21 KJV 1900
21 And said, Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, And naked shall I return thither: The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord.
(KJV 1900)
z ch. 8:7. .
a Comp. ver. 10 with ch. 1:3.
12 So the Lord blessed the latter end of Job more than his beginning: for he had fourteen thousand sheep, and six thousand camels, and a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand she asses. 13 He had also seven sons and three daughters.
b Comp. ver. 10. & ch. 1:2 with .
The Holy Bible: King James Version, Electronic Edition of the 1900 Authorized Version. (Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 2009), .
Job 42:12–13 KJV 1900
12 So the Lord blessed the latter end of Job more than his beginning: for he had fourteen thousand sheep, and six thousand camels, and a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand she asses. 13 He had also seven sons and three daughters.
(1) theft of oxen and donkeys (1:13–15) - Sabeans from the South
Job 1:13–15 KJV 1900
13 And there was a day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother’s house: 14 And there came a messenger unto Job, and said, The oxen were plowing, and the asses feeding beside them: 15 And the Sabeans fell upon them, and took them away; yea, they have slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.
Job 1:21 KJV 1900
21 And said, Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, And naked shall I return thither: The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord.
1000 yoke of oxen
If you like the idea of owning livestock that will amaze your friends and neighbors, a pair of Gayal oxen might just fit the bill. Because of their rarity, a 2-year-old pair sells for around $12,000, according to Jurgen Schulz who runs the Kifaru Exotic Animal Auction House in Lampasas, Texas. He imported his Gayal oxen from Sweden many years ago.
On the rural heritage website, an oxen team was being sold for 1000 Dollars - One for $500
500 yoke (in today’s dollars) would be around $500,000 - If all the oxen were taken, that would have been quite a loss.
500 yoke (in today’s dollars) would be around $500,000
500 female donkeys
On horse clicks website they were selling female donkeys for $2500, $1200 and $1500 dollars...
500 donkeys about $650,000 in todays money
Servant’s Killed
(2) fire (1:16) - From above - North
Job 1:16 KJV 1900
16 While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, The fire of God is fallen from heaven, and hath burned up the sheep, and the servants, and consumed them; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.
7000 sheep
It also kindled Elijah’s sacrifice on Mount Carmel () and
$155-175 dollars
struck the first two groups of fifty men that King Ahaziah sent to Elijah (2 Kgs 1:10, 12, 14).
7000 sheep = $1,155,000
(3) theft of camels (1:17) - Chaldeans from the Northeast
and
Camel prices start at about $55,000
3000 camels = $165,000,000 in todays money
(4) the storm that killed his children (1:18–19) - Probably the Scirroco (shear - ahko)- a strong wind that begins in northern Africa (so from the West compared to where Job was) and can reach hurricane strength....
10 children - 7 sons and three daughters - No value or price can be put upon your children…they are precious beyond price!
So Job was getting slammed from every direction. What Does he do? What would you do?
In relation to the loss of children
A similar loss befell Horatio Spafford when his four children perished at sea, an event that prompted him to pen the hymn “It Is Well with My Soul.”
This, in fact, will be the tenor of Job’s response.
I. He took action (v. 20)
Job 1:20 KJV 1900
20 Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped,
Five of the nine words in v. 20 are action verbs
A. He Got up
B. He Tore (Mantle - a robe or loose fitting tunic) - Typical reaction to traumatic news)
C. He Shaved - Typical reaction
D. He Fell -
E. He Worshipped - The falling down and worshipping are what separates him from others....
It was not a fist in the face of God
Ill. Have you seen the images in the news of people with their fists raised…It is an symbol of defiance, unity, strength, defiance, or resistance.
The raised fist, or the clenched fist, ✊, is a symbol of solidarity and support. It is also used as a salute to express unity, strength, defiance, or resistance.
For Job, it was Humble acknowledgement of and capitulation to God’s sovereign will.
II. He spoke poetically - It is in very difficult times that poetry can be and has been used to express the truest content of the human heart and also to bind up and heal the broken heart…
”Poetry to a broken heart is what ink is to the pen.”
A. He expresses his pain and suffering and sense of loss...
In pain, Always remember...
Isaiah 55:8 KJV 1900
For my thoughts are not your thoughts, Neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord.
Job 1:21 KJV 1900
And said, Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, And naked shall I return thither: The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord.
(KJV 1900): 21 And said,Naked came I out of my mother’s womb,And naked shall I return thither:The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away;Blessed be the name of the Lord.
Don’t read into this that Job goes back into his mother’s womb at death or that he goes back to mother earth....
This is poetry....he is simply saying that he came into this world with nothing and he will leave it with nothing....
“Shrouds have no pockets”
B. He expresses his faith in God
“The Lord” occurs three times in the second line....He is focusing on the LORD. All Secondary causes (fire, wind, robbers, satan) are removed and he focuses on the primary mover.....cause....THE LORD!
He gave...
He took away…
He is to be praised....
C. He maintains his integrity
Job 1:22 KJV 1900
In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.
His troubles are minimized:
You know when I think of this little verse I am intrigued....and my attention is captured....
Look at the little word “this”
It is referring to the calamities of verses 13-19...
It doesn’t say:
“In all this major trauma, heartache, misery, destruction....
It almost seems to minimize it in the end and says, “in all this..”
2 Corinthians 4:17 KJV 1900
For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory;
Light????
,
2 Corinthians 4:8–12 KJV 1900
We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but not in despair; Persecuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed; Always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body. For we which live are alway delivered unto death for Jesus’ sake, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our mortal flesh. So then death worketh in us, but life in you.
2 Corinthians 4:16–18 KJV 1900
For which cause we faint not; but though our outward man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day. For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory; While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.
Any one of Job’s calamities would have caused lesser men to lose faith, abandon hope, and blame God! But not Job!
Find illustrations
He did not sin! That is, he did not charge God with folly, wrong-doing....To do so is sin!
It is a rare and commendable posture that the hero from Uz assumed, one that should characterize all God’s children whatever turns life might take.
D. He Was Blessed in the End
God’s Love - He fully made up for Job’s losses and troubles....
3. Test of Health (2:1–10)
It is also interesting to notice that in this fourth episode the author referred to the four corners of the house, and in the epilogue (42:16) Job is said to have lived to see “his children and their children to the fourth generation,” thus suggesting full restoration.
Job 42:16 KJV 1900
16 After this lived Job an hundred and forty years, and saw his sons, and his sons’ sons, even four generations.
A number of similarities exist between this chapter and the preceding one. Verses 1–3a are nearly identical to 1:6–8. Job 1:12 corresponds with 2:6, and 1:22 corresponds with 2:10c. In these ten verses Job’s testing intensifies. Up to this point he has lost his possessions and his children. Now he would lose his health, which the Satan hoped would break his will and prompt him to curse his God. These two tests together produce yet other losses that we will note in the course of the debate cycle: honor, respect, standing in the community, friendships, and even the support of his wife and brothers (12:4; 16:10; 19:13–19; 30:1, 9–10).
Conclusion:
Think about the Saviour and his humble submission to the will of his Father....
It was the Father’s will that Jesus be crucified. In the midst of it all, his Father forsook him… “My God, My God, Why Hast thou forsaken me?”
At the end....
Father, into thy hands, I commend my spirit.”
Jesus didn’t turn his back on his Father!
He suffered forsaking so that we need never be forsaken?
There is always a higher and a nobler purpose to the Christian’s struggles and difficulties....
Do not charge God foolishly.
Trust HIM!
From a Commentary...
Thus the chapter ends with “the greatest man among all the people of the East” destitute, childless, and broken. In the space of less than a page and in a brief span of time, he went from being the greatest to being the least of men. We the readers know something that Job did not, and so we cannot enter into his sorrow. Like God, we know the end from the beginning. We know all about the fact that Job had been chosen as a test case. Because of his godliness. God selected him for this trial. Job was unaware that his troubles were a great honor.
Would Job remain faithful?
Will we?
A similar loss befell Horatio Spafford when his four children perished at sea, an event that prompted him to pen the hymn “It Is Well with My Soul.” That, in fact, will be the tenor of Job’s response.
It is also interesting to notice that in this fourth episode the author referred to the four corners of the house, and in the epilogue (42:16) Job is said to have lived to see “his children and their children to the fourth generation,” thus suggesting full restoration.
1:20–22. In response to the fierceness of Satan’s rapid fourfold assault, Job … tore his robe, symbolizing inner turmoil and shock (cf. 2:12; , ; ; Jud. 11:35), and shaved his head (cf. ; ; ), depicting the loss of his personal glory. Falling to the ground, not in despair, but in obeisance to God, Job worshiped.
1:22 Antecedent to “this” are the calamities of vv. 13–19. Any one of those events might have caused lesser men to lose faith, abandon hope, or even charge God with neglect or deliberate evil. The “sin” that Job did not commit was to accuse God of “wrongdoing.” He did indirectly acknowledge that God had sent these troubles, but he did not at this point question God’s justice, love, wisdom, or sovereignty. It is a rare and commendable posture that the hero from Uz assumed, one that should characterize all God’s children whatever turns life might take.
Thus the chapter ends with “the greatest man among all the people of the East” destitute, childless, and broken. In the space of less than a page and in a brief span of time, he went from being the greatest to being the least of men. We the readers know something that Job did not, and so we cannot enter into his sorrow. Like God, we know the end from the beginning. We know all about the fact that Job had been chosen as a test case. Because of his godliness God selected him for this trial. Job was unaware that his troubles were a great honor. Would Job remain faithful? Will we?
3. Test of Health (2:1–10)
A number of similarities exist between this chapter and the preceding one. Verses 1–3a are nearly identical to 1:6–8. corresponds with 2:6, and 1:22 corresponds with 2:10c. In these ten verses Job’s testing intensifies. Up to this point he has lost his possessions and his children. Now he would lose his health, which the Satan hoped would break his will and prompt him to curse his God. These two tests together produce yet other losses that we will note in the course of the debate cycle: honor, respect, standing in the community, friendships, and even the support of his wife and brothers (12:4; 16:10; 19:13–19; 30:1, 9–10).
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