Faithlife Sermons

For Sin Not His Own

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Introduction

I played baseball when I was younger. I started in t-ball and played until I was about 12. As you get older and rise through the various leagues you go from a ball on a tee, to a pitching machine, or maybe coaches pitching, but eventually you get to where the other players are throwing the ball. This is where it get’s dangerous. I can vividly remember getting hit by several pitches. One of the clearest ones was when I could see the ball coming for me and knew I wouldn’t be fast enough to get out of the way. So I turned by body and allowed the ball to hit me in the rear. It hit hard enough to where I wasn’t going to be able to stand and run around the bases. In baseball for these kinds of situations they have what is called a pinch runner. The thing about the pinch runner is that he wasn’t the one up to bat, he wasn’t the one who did the work, he wasn’t the one who let the ball hit him; but he gets to run the bases. I deserved to run those bases! I mean, I let myself get hit by the ball so I could run! I earned that! But there was no way I could run those bases. So, I needed a pinch runner.
Christ is our pinch runner. We are sinners. That sin earned us the wrath of God. The penalty for sin is death. We deserve to face an eternity separated from God. In order to escape God’s wrath the penalty for our sin has to be paid. There was no way for us to redeem ourselves. No way for us to pay the penalty for sin. But Jesus steps in, and like a pinch runner He takes our place. Doing for us what we cannot do for ourselves.
Our title this morning is “For Sin Not His Own”.
This is our fourth look at what the prophet Isaiah reveals concerning God’s suffering servant. He was described in 52:13-15. Though He will suffer more than anyone else, He will also be exalted. In 53:1-3 we learned that he would be a man of sorrows. He was average in appearance and would be rejected by His people. vv. 4-6 presented that he would die in our place! He would bear our griefs and sorrows, be crushed and abused for our transgression and iniquity; all to bring us peace with God. We have turned from Him yet He bore the iniquity of all mankind.
In our passage today we will learn that the Suffering servant, Jesus the Christ, the Messiah, would suffer as an innocent victim.
The innocence of God’s Servant is revealed in three ways.
When we understand that the innocent suffered for the guilty it should stir us to thanksgiving and praise.
Thanksgiving and praise should result in humble service.
Here’s the question we must consider. How should redeemed people respond to their redeemer?
The innocence of God’s Servant is first seen as Isaiah declares that…

1. The Servant Shall Be Silent v. 7

Two words that benefit us when defined.
Oppressedנגשׂ (nagaś) to spur on; to force to work; to oppress. To be hard pressed v. — to be facing or experiencing trouble or difficulty.
Oppressed – נגשׂ (ngś)
What difficulty, trouble, and oppression did Jesus face? Lack of prayer support - Disciples. Betrayal - Judas. Abandonment - Disciples. Mockery, Beating, Spitting - Sanhedrin. Scourging, Mocking, Beating, Crucifixion - Romans.
That’s not all. The verse continues.
Afflictedענה (ahʿnah) to humiliate; to oppress; to be wretched, suffering; to do violence to. To be caused to experience great unhappiness.
Afflicted – ענה (hʿnh)
When was Jesus humiliated, oppressed, and caused to suffer? The Sanhedrin slapped His face and mocked His claims . The Romans soldiers dressed Him up to humiliate Him, then they crucified Him naked.
These verses proclaim that even in the face of oppression, humiliation, and suffering, the servant would keep silent.
Turn to .
Matthew 26:62–67 NKJV
And the high priest arose and said to Him, “Do You answer nothing? What is it these men testify against You?” But Jesus kept silent. And the high priest answered and said to Him, “I put You under oath by the living God: Tell us if You are the Christ, the Son of God!” Jesus said to him, “It is as you said. Nevertheless, I say to you, hereafter you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Power, and coming on the clouds of heaven.” Then the high priest tore his clothes, saying, “He has spoken blasphemy! What further need do we have of witnesses? Look, now you have heard His blasphemy! What do you think?” They answered and said, “He is deserving of death.” Then they spat in His face and beat Him; and others struck Him with the palms of their hands,
Jesus only answered when put under oath by the high priest. Mark records that Jesus was just as silent before Pilate. Turn to .
Mark 15:1–5 NKJV
Immediately, in the morning, the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council; and they bound Jesus, led Him away, and delivered Him to Pilate. Then Pilate asked Him, “Are You the King of the Jews?” He answered and said to him, “It is as you say.” And the chief priests accused Him of many things, but He answered nothing. Then Pilate asked Him again, saying, “Do You answer nothing? See how many things they testify against You!” But Jesus still answered nothing, so that Pilate marveled.
The silence of Jesus causes Pilate to marvel!
Everything that He has suffered, everything that He has endured, and yet He is still silent. Why? There was nothing more to say.
Would we be silent in the face of adversity? Scripture is very clear about how we should behave toward those who mistreat us. Turn to .
Romans 12:14–21 NKJV
Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse. Rejoice with those who rejoice, and weep with those who weep. Be of the same mind toward one another. Do not set your mind on high things, but associate with the humble. Do not be wise in your own opinion. Repay no one evil for evil. Have regard for good things in the sight of all men. If it is possible, as much as depends on you, live peaceably with all men. Beloved, do not avenge yourselves, but rather give place to wrath; for it is written, “Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,” says the Lord. Therefore “If your enemy is hungry, feed him; If he is thirsty, give him a drink; For in so doing you will heap coals of fire on his head.” Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.
Oppressed, afflicted, yet silent.
This prophecy is clear about how the Messiah would suffer in silence. When we look at the record in the gospels we see the fulfillment of this prophecy.
Led as a lamb to the slaughter. Jesus did not fight or plead or call a legion of angels. He patiently, quietly, went to the Cross to pay the penalty for sin.
Like a sheep going to be sheared, he kept silent.
Sheep go to the slaughter and shearing in silence, as did our Lord. But there the similarity ends. Lambs go silently because they are unaware of what is taking place. That was not the case with our redeemer. Jesus went to the Cross knowing full well what He would suffer! Yet He went anyway.
Innocent yet oppressed. Silent yet afflicted. Bearing our sin.
Yet He went anyway. Innocent yet oppressed. Silent yet afflicted. Bearing my sin.
#210 “Jesus Paid It All” (v. 1)
The innocence of God’s Servant is seen secondly as Isaiah declares that…

2. The Servant Shall Be Stricken v. 8

This first phrase is a difficult one to understand. The NASB, ESV and others translate it “By oppression and judgment he was taken away”.
Prisonעֹ֫צֶר ʿ(ōʹt·ṣěr) closure; oppression, pressure. The act of subjugating by cruelty.
Prison – עֹ֫צֶר ʿ(ōʹ·ṣěr)
Personally I think the LEB (which is the translation made by Logos Bible Software) is the clearest. They translated it “He was taken by restraint of justice”.
The point is that Jesus was treated unjustly. His arrest was without charge, His trial was illegal, and His sentencing was based on false evidence and coercion! The entire fiasco was a gross miscarriage of justice! It was all a farce!
As believers in Jesus Christ, this is what we can expect when persecution strikes. Those of this world will not treat us any better than they treated our Lord.
How faithful and committed will we be when treated without justice?
Isaiah goes on to speak of Christ’s generation.
Declare – שׂיח (śyḥ) to speak enthusiastically; to praise, lament, taunt, mock, instruct, teach; to meditate with thanks and praise. To consider (reckon) v. — to deem or reckon to be. Verb, third person, masculine, singular +- Polel, yiqtol (imperfect), Pi’’el, active, preterite.
Declareשׂיח (śyḥ) to speak enthusiastically; to praise, lament, taunt, mock, instruct, teach; to meditate with thanks and praise. To consider (reckon) v. — to deem or reckon to be.
Declare – שׂיח (śyḥ)
I believe the implication here is that the people of Jesus’ generation didn’t care! It meant nothing to them that He lived and died. Little did they know that the life and death of this man meant everything!
Why? What is so important about the death of Jesus?
He was cut off, killed, murdered. Stricken for the transgressions of others.
Just in case there is some question, a transgression is a sin.

Even though God’s people deserve to be punished for their rebellion against Him, He has sent His Servant to redeem them.

So what is the prophet saying here? Christ was stricken, He was crucified for the transgressions of others.
Our sin put an innocent man on the Cross!
Stricken, cut off, falsely accused and sentenced to death. All while living in sinless perfection!
Turn to .
Stricken – נֶ֫גַע (něʹ·ḡǎʿ) onset of illness; affliction, plague, infestation; blow, violent crime. Blow n. — a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon. Noun, singular, absolute +- common, masculine.
1 Peter 2:21–25 NKJV
For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps: “Who committed no sin, Nor was deceit found in His mouth”; who, when He was reviled, did not revile in return; when He suffered, He did not threaten, but committed Himself to Him who judges righteously; who Himself bore our sins in His own body on the tree, that we, having died to sins, might live for righteousness—by whose stripes you were healed. For you were like sheep going astray, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls.
Christ is our example. He did not sin. He did not repay those who assaulted Him. He bore our sin! He healed us with His stripes! He returned the wandering sheep to the fold!
(S).
The innocence of God’s Servant is finally seen as Isaiah declares that…
John 18:37–38 NKJV
Pilate therefore said to Him, “Are You a king then?” Jesus answered, “You say rightly that I am a king. For this cause I was born, and for this cause I have come into the world, that I should bear witness to the truth. Everyone who is of the truth hears My voice.” Pilate said to Him, “What is truth?” And when he had said this, he went out again to the Jews, and said to them, “I find no fault in Him at all.”
2 Corinthians 5:21 NKJV
For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.
The innocent took the place of the guilty that they might become righteous.
Pilate finds no fault in Jesus. He offers to release Him but the Jews choose Barabbas.
Now turn to .
As formerly wandering sheep, as sinners made righteous, as slaves of sin set free by Christ; how will we live today?
John 19:1–6 NKJV
So then Pilate took Jesus and scourged Him. And the soldiers twisted a crown of thorns and put it on His head, and they put on Him a purple robe. Then they said, “Hail, King of the Jews!” And they struck Him with their hands. Pilate then went out again, and said to them, “Behold, I am bringing Him out to you, that you may know that I find no fault in Him.” Then Jesus came out, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe. And Pilate said to them, “Behold the Man!” Therefore, when the chief priests and officers saw Him, they cried out, saying, “Crucify Him, crucify Him! Pilate said to them, “You take Him and crucify Him, for I find no fault in Him.”
They beat Him, the mock Him, the abuse Him with a crown of thorns! Though Pilate found no fault in Him, still Jesus was stricken. The Jewish leaders cry out for Jesus’ crucifixion, yet He was guiltless.
For our transgressions He was abused, that we might be forgiven.
#210 “Jesus Paid It All” (v. 2)
The innocence of God’s Servant is finally seen as Isaiah declares that…

3. The Servant Shall Be Spotless v. 9

When Jesus was crucified, the plan was for Him to be buried with the thieves and others who were executed by the same means. The death that He died was reserved for the vilest! It was the death of the worst criminals in the Roman empire! Yet tells us that He “endured the cross, despising the shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.He endured that we might have life!
Wicked lit. means guilty. That was the plan, to place Him with the guilty. But God had another plan.
Wicked lit. means guilty.
Turn to .
Matthew 27:57–60 NKJV
Now when evening had come, there came a rich man from Arimathea, named Joseph, who himself had also become a disciple of Jesus. This man went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. Then Pilate commanded the body to be given to him. When Joseph had taken the body, he wrapped it in a clean linen cloth, and laid it in his new tomb which he had hewn out of the rock; and he rolled a large stone against the door of the tomb, and departed.
Wicked lit. means guilty.
This rich man, John says he was a secret disciple and accompanied by Nicodemus, has Jesus placed in his own new tomb. He sacrifices for Christ! Risks arrest and imprisonment for Christ! Prophecy is fulfilled and the verse goes on to tell us why Jesus was given this honor.
He was innocent! He had done no violence! He had not lied! makes this clear (S).
1 Peter 1:18–19 NKJV
knowing that you were not redeemed with corruptible things, like silver or gold, from your aimless conduct received by tradition from your fathers, but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot.
Jesus is the spotless lamb of God! He is able to save us from our sins because He died in our place!
Turn to .
1 Peter 2:21–25 NKJV
For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps: “Who committed no sin, Nor was deceit found in His mouth”; who, when He was reviled, did not revile in return; when He suffered, He did not threaten, but committed Himself to Him who judges righteously; who Himself bore our sins in His own body on the tree, that we, having died to sins, might live for righteousness—by whose stripes you were healed. For you were like sheep going astray, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls.
Christ is our example. He did not sin. He did not repay those who assaulted Him. He bore our sin! He healed us with His stripes! He returned the wandering sheep to the fold!
It was my sin and your sin that Jesus bore to the cross. Colossians tells us that His blood wiped away all accusations against us! This cleared the way for us to have a relationship with God.
(S).
2 Corinthians 5:21 NKJV
For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.
The innocent took the place of the guilty that they might become righteous.
As formerly wandering sheep, as sinners made righteous, as slaves of sin set free by Christ; how will we live today?
#210 “Jesus Paid It All” (v. 3)
Turn with me to . This is a time for believers to remember the price that was paid. To be reminded of the penalty of sin. Taking part of communion does not save you. This is simply a way for us to be reminded of what Christ has done. If you know the Lord as savior this morning, please join us in bread and juice as we remember Jesus Christ. These are only symbols, they represent the body and blood of our Savior. Examination – verses 26-32

OBSERVANCE OF COMMUNION

The Bread (His Body) vv. 23-24 #342 “Just As I Am” (v. 1)
Just as I am without one plea But that Thy Blood was shed for me And that Thou bidd’st me come to Thee O Lamb of God I come I come
The Cup (His Blood) v. 25 #342 “Just As I Am” (v. 2)
The Cup (His Blood) v. 25 #342 “Just As I Am” (v. 2)
Just as I am and waiting not To rid my soul of one dark blot To Thee Whose Blood can cleanse each spot O Lamb of God I come I come

Conclusion

Conclusion
We come to Christ bankrupt. We have nothing to offer for our salvation. (S).
Titus 3:5 NKJV
not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to His mercy He saved us, through the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Spirit,
We come to Christ broken. Enslaved to sin. (S).
Romans 3:23 NKJV
for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,
We come to Christ believing. Knowing that He is the only hope! (S).
Ephesians 2:8–9 NKJV
For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.
We walk with Christ forgiven. No longer dead in sin! (S).
Colossians 1:14 NKJV
in whom we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins.
We walk with Christ free. Able to fellowship and serve our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ. (S).
Romans 6:22 NKJV
But now having been set free from sin, and having become slaves of God, you have your fruit to holiness, and the end, everlasting life.
I pray that the reality that Christ died for our sin would cause us to rejoice.
I pray that our rejoicing in Christ would result in service.
May Jesus the Christ, the King of glory, be glorified in our lives.
#210 “Jesus Paid It All” (v. 4)
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