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2 Timothy 3:10-17

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But as for you, Timothy V.10-17

2 Timothy 3:10–17 ESV
You, however, have followed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness, my persecutions and sufferings that happened to me at Antioch, at Iconium, and at Lystra—which persecutions I endured; yet from them all the Lord rescued me. Indeed, all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evil people and impostors will go on from bad to worse, deceiving and being deceived. But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.
In verses 10-11 Paul begins to address Timothy directly. He says “you, however”, and then contrasts Timothy from the people he previously described, the wolves amongst the sheep.
Why is it important to differentiate Timothy from the imposters described above?
To remind Timothy of who he is, he’s different and the reason times are tough is because he’s different.
Paul then goes on to list the ways Timothy is different, and his differences are in the fact that he is a true disciple of Paul, and a true disciple of Jesus.
So, Timothy followed Paul’s teaching, he heard his sermons, Pauls teaching to others, and I’m sure Paul and Timothy had many a discussion in their time alone together about life, faith, persecution, and just being a follower of Jesus.
Not only did Timothy follow Paul’s teaching, but he also followed his conduct, Timothy witnessed Paul’ manner of life, the way he handled himself in both public and in private.
Timothy followed Paul’s purpose in life, he knew his mission statement as one who considered himself a servant of the Lord, as Paul said in chapter 1 verse 11, one who was appointed a preacher and apostle and a teacher, not to mention an evangelist, missionary and a church planter.
Timothy followed in Paul’s faith, he now is a true follower of Jesus and he too has daily trust in the Lord, both in good times and in troublesome times.
Timothy has followed Paul’s patience, his longsuffering through criticism of his character and the physical attacks against him.
Timothy has seen and possesses the same love as Paul, love not only for the members of the church, but also for the foolish and deceived, with the same desire for all to know Jesus.
Timothy has witnessed Paul’s perseverance, his strong endurance in difficult circumstances, persecutions and sufferings in the past and present with stonings, floggings, mock trials, and imprisonments, and all unjustifiably.
Paul brings Timothy back to where Timothy was from when he writes of Antioch, Iconium, and Lystra, back to when they first met and spent time together, where he saw so much, when Paul invited Timothy to be his disciple, and where Timothy became aware of the high cost of ministry, but also how God delivered Paul through it all.
Chuck Swindoll writes, “Timothy, we’ve come this far together and you’ve seen the best and worst of it. And we’re still alive, still engaged in the work of the gospel.”
This is all meant to encourage Timothy to continue on even though Paul is in prison and times are tough in Ephesus.
Now in verses 12-13, Paul shifts from the past to the future writing ,
“Indeed, all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evil people and imposters will go on from bad to worse, deceiving and being deceived.”
Why is important for us to know that all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted?
There’s a couple of key words and terms in this verse, all who desire to live a godly life will be persecuted, the first is all, but that one is connected to the desire to live a godly life, so we’ll tackle that one first.
A godly life is a life lived in a godly manner. The only example we truly have of a life lived in a way that god would live it is Jesus. So Paul is saying, all who desire, all whose heart and will are determined to live a life that truly honors and glorifies God is a life that looks like Jesus’. Paul wrote in , “Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ.”
So for Timothy, as he has witnessed and followed in Paul’s example, who was following Jesus’, persecution and suffering came to both of them, so why would it not come to all others who live like them. Here is the all, all who truly live like Jesus and Paul, and the will be persecuted. If you truly want to make a difference in people’s eternal lives, you will be misunderstood, maligned, mistreated, and hated, count on it. Hated by imposters and deceivers, evil men, those leading astray the flock, and deceiving the unbeliever with spells, this goes for Timothy and for us too.
In verses 14-15 Paul shifts his focus on the present. “But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.”
Again, Paul is directing his comments to Timothy, “But as for you, Timothy, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed...”
The word continue means to remain, live, stay, abide, to continue is a state of existence, and Paul is linking this to what Timothy has learned and firmly believed. Timothy has learned and experienced a lot with Paul, so be convinced of these things so you don’t doubt or question. Even from Timothy’s childhood, because of his mother and grandmother, he has been aware of the path of salvation through the Messiah, who has been revealed as Jesus.
Finally in this chapter, Paul writes two verses that have become very well known.
2 Timothy 3:16–17 ESV
All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.
2 Timothy 3:16-17
Paul stars with all scripture which is different from sacred writings. Sacred writings would indicate Paul is referring to what we would call the Old Testament, here using the word scripture Paul is including the current writings of the apostles of Jesus.
His claim is that just as the Old Testament was inspired by God so also is the writings of the apostles.
Theo-pneustros Theo means God and pneo means breathed. Pneuma which is from the same root word, is breath or spirit, so God breathed and Spirit inspired writings. The same word is used for how God gave Adam life, He pneuma breathed life into him. So all that to say, because it is spirit inspired and God-breathed it has the life of God in it, it is living and active as the author of Hebrews writes in chapter 4 verse 11.
How important is the Word of God to you and do you see the benefits that God has it in for us?
Because it is alive with the life of God in it it must be profitable or have much gain for us in the areas of
Teaching-to communicate information for the purpose of growth towards maturity, to make on wise
the area of Reproof or conviction and rebuke. This is to point out errors and wrong and crooked thinking which leads to wrong doing. by showing these sins it convinces us to behave differently.
The area of Correction which purpose is restoration and reformation. Correction shows us how to straiten out what was crooked, restoring us to an upright state and setting things right between us and God.
Lastly in the area of Training in righteousness, the chastisement or discipline with encouragement. The idea here is guiding a child on to adulthood. Training has the idea of showing the correct way of behaving and doing things so mistakes aren’t made. This is all for the purpose of right living with God, for His honor and holy purposes. We are declared righteous upon salvation, but we need to grow and mature into that righteousness so our lives match what God says is true of us.
But that’s not the end, this all has a purpose too. “So that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.”
There is a purpose in our salvation and a purpose in our growing into maturity. We are dishonoring Jesus’ sacrifice for us if we remain a spiritual infant. We must do our part to mature so that we can do the work that God has for us.
Paul uses the word complete and it means qualified for a function or equal to the task, competent, efficient and proficient because of the proper teaching, rebuking, correction and training.
Next is equipped, and the indication is that the equipping is done by dive activity, supernaturally equipped to accomplish, thoroughly furnished by God for every good work that God has for us to do. As we strive to live out the great commandment, Love God and Love others, this will take supernatural empowering, all for the glory of God and the building of His kingdom.
Ephesians 2:10 ESV
For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.
Paul, on his deathbed is giving Timothy an eternal perspective and helping him see what matters. Our salvation was just the start of the race, and some of us are just coasting along, maybe satisfied we are in the race, or have gone a couple of miles, but where could we be, where should we be, not guilt but reality, we want to finish the race and hear “well done my good and faithful servant” but will we, should we, what if the race ended tomorrow?
How important is this to you? What matters? What will last? Is it wrong to desire rewards in heaven? Why do we have so many time wasting activities in our lives that serve no good eternal purpose? Why don’t we prioritize?
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