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Preparing Young Black Males for Future Leadership

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Preparing Young Black Males for Future Leadership

Prayer: Heavenly Father, We praise you and thank you for loving us. We thank you for your Son who died on the cross for our transgressions. We thank you for the Holy Spirit that dwells within us. Continue your work in us, for Lord, we know we are a work in process. Help us to stay focused on you and to do your will in all areas of our life. Help us to be obedient to your Word and be in fellowship with you and our fellow man. In the name of Jesus. Amen.
Ephesians 6:1–3 NRSV
1 Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. 2 “Honor your father and mother”—this is the first commandment with a promise: 3 “so that it may be well with you and you may live long on the earth.”
Ephesians 6:1-3
In recent years, much of the racial news in America has been sobering, if not depressing. Trayvon Martin. Tamir Rice. Walter Scott. Ferguson. Baltimore. And Charlottesville. While many public commentators, like Ta-Nehisi Coates, have underlined the enduring character of racism in America, and the ways in which America's racial divide has exacted a particular kind of toll on black men and boys, there is today, unheralded, good news about African-American men.
In fact, millions of black men are flourishing in America today.
Our new report, "Black Men Making It In America," spotlights two pieces of particular good news about the economic well-being of black men.
First, the share of black men in poverty has fallen from 41% in 1960 to 18% today. Second, and more importantly, the share of black men in the middle or upper class -- as measured by their family income -- has risen from 38% in 1960 to 57% today. In other words, about one-in-two black men in America have reached the middle class or higher.
This good news is important and should be widely disseminated because it might help reduce prejudicial views of black men in the society at large, and negative portrayals of black men in the media. It should also engender hope among all African-Americans -- particularly young black males.
So, what routes are black men taking to make it in America? We identified three factors that are associated with their success: education, work, and marriage. Black men who worked full-time, had some college education, or were married were much more likely to be members of the middle or upper class by the time they got to their 50s. What's more: right now, only a small minority of black men graduate from college: 17%. Schools and colleges need to do more to identify, recruit, and support young black men so they are accepted, attend, and graduate from four-year colleges and universities in the US. By providing stable work, good health care, housing, and opportunities for advancement, by championing virtues such as duty, responsibility, loyalty, and perseverance, and by pushing racial integration, the US military has served as an important route into the middle class.
Moreover, the US military is also known for its marriage-oriented culture, and we found that black men who served in the military as young men were much more likely to be married later, at ages 29-37, compared to their peers who did not serve. This marriage advantage played a role in boosting their later odds of success. The evidence suggests that if more Americans knew how many black men were succeeding, and more about the routes they are taking, it would reduce racial prejudice and engender hope among today's young black males that they too have a shot at making it in America.
It is important to challenge and offer practical suggestions to older African Americans about how to systematically prepare younger Black males for future leadership. This can be done by:
Stressing the importance of discipleship
Understanding the need to biblically disciple Black males
Discussing the Black Church’s role in discipling and preparing Black males for leadership
The African proverb-”It takes a village to raise a child”-captures this overall challenge and task. Historically, the African American community has been group-oriented and hence, older Black males particularly need to heed the clarion call to “man up” and take on the challenge of assisting in discipling young Black males in homes, churches, and communities so they can be effective in their future roles.
Stressing the importance of discipleship - Scripture tell us that we must properly train our youths, or else they will bring disgrace to the family. Therefore, effective discipleship requires training in a particular manner, custom, or tradition in order to ensure that a certain outcome or order is continued and/or maintained. Hence, the expected reward of someone being a disciple or adherent to a particular leader or teaching is that someday that person will eventually assume a position of leadership and be successful, given the preparation that has been rendered. For example , “As for ourselves, we have decided that if people ask us what happened today at the Temple or if they ask us to tell them more about Jesus, we have no choice but to tell them the truth of what we’ve seen and heard” demonstrates that effective disciples must have hand-on training as well as verbal teaching, in order to master skills and knowledge imparted. We sometimes may be afraid to share our faith in Christ because people might feel uncomfortable and might reject us. Peter and John’s zeal for the Lord was so strong that they could not keep quiet ,even when threatened. If your courage to witness for God has weakened, pray that your boldness may increase. If Jesus had to train his disciples, we must do the same to ensure the success among our young Black males in order to prepare them for the twenty-first century, and the challenges and leadership opportunities to come.
If Jesus had to train his disciples, we must do the same to ensure the success among our young Black males in order to prepare them for the twenty-first century, and the challenges and leadership opportunities to come.
If Jesus had to train his disciples, we must do the same to ensure the success among our young Black males in order to prepare them for the twenty-first century, and the challenges and leadership opportunities to come.
1.Stressing the importance of discipleship
2.Understanding the need to biblically disciple Black males -
Jesus says that “For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: but whosoever will lose his life for my sake, the same shall save it”
( KJV). Most often, as a stater, it only takes a sincere effort on the part of a strong parent
(guardian), male pastor, mentor, or elder for the younger Black male to listen and adhere to instruction and correction and begin the move in positive direction. (KJV) reminds us: “Train a child in the way he should go: and when he is old he will not depart (or turn) from it.” PARENTS ARE a child’s escort through life. We have, in our culture, approximately eighteen years to escort our children safely into their own way, like a police escort that escorts specially designated travelers through traffic. Parents are to escort their children through life, safely, during the time that we have responsibility for them. By talking to teachers, other parents, and grandparents, we can better discern and develop the individual capabilities of each child. When parents teach a child how to make decisions, they don’t have to watch every step he or she takes. Train your children to choose the right way.
Thus, the quality of training a child(Black youth) receives is crucial to their later development, underscoring the importance of proper training. Such a process was referred to as the rites of passages in the traditional African society; for these rites of passage prepared youth for their future leadership roles. Moreover, as a people we must continue to design rites of passages programs (as well as expanding other mentoring programs) for our Black males that includes an understanding of our African heritage, history, and spirituality.
1.Stressing the importance of discipleship
2.Understanding the need to biblically disciple Black males
3. Discussing the Black Church’s role in discipling and preparing Black males for leadership- The Black Church, as well as the home, has always had essential function in the instructive development and training (see Curry 1991, S. June 1991, and Richardson, 1996), as well as preparing of our Black males for leadership roles. This is till paramount to ensuring their survival and advancement. Therefore, parents, elders, and others who are entrusted to disciple Black males must take a cognizant pledge to “disciple biblically” within the context of the church. We must teach young Black males how to reverence their parents and elders, for doing so gives them life. What I like about God’s Word is that it repeats itself, thus representing to us the magnitude of a particular concept for example, ‘Honor your parents. Show respect to them, and I will bless you with long life, and things will go well for you in the land I have promised to give you. Obeying our parents is our main task when we are young, but honoring them should continue even beyond their death. One way to honor parents is to provide for them in times of financial need or when they are ill and unable to care for themselves. Perhaps the best way to honor them is to pass on their Christ-honoring values to our children. Honoring involves all that sons and daughters do with their lives-the way they work and talk, the values they hold, and the morals they practice. What are you doing to show respect to your parents? Are you living in a way that brings honor to them?
In conclusion, 1.Stressing the importance of discipleship
2.Understanding the need to biblically disciple Black males
3. Discussing the Black Church’s role in discipling and preparing Black males for leadership. Older black males who are privileged to work with and around young Black males have a grave responsibility that should not be taken lightly. Older African-American males, with conscience stirred, must see the importance of discipling younger Black males for effective future leadership. Elder Black males, I urge you again to heed the clarion call to “man up” and take on the challenge of assisting in discipling young Black males in your homes, churches, and communities. The challenges of “discipling our young Black males are apparent and the pay off for our communities and the kingdom of God is unlimited. Therefore, we must be willingly to provide financial support, sacrifice time, and risk personal gain to help tell and retell our story to young Black males- turning them into God-centered masterpieces who can effectively and willingly take on life challenges so as to ensure a godly presence in the twenty-first century. It is my fervent and continual prayer that older, well-grounded, conscious, and God centered Black males who are entrusted to train our younger Black males commit themselves to “disciple biblically.” God commands it, and the trying times demand it, and future Black male leadership depends on it.
and around young Black males have a grave responsibility that should not be taken lightly.
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