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The God Who Keeps His Promises, Exodus 1:1-22

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The God Who Keeps His Promises

Sometimes we have a hard to seeing God. It is usually when things are either really good or when things are really bad.
During Good Times we can be tempted to forget about God. This is a big thing in the Shire where life is so good. 70% of 265 000 people say they believe in God, but only 4% go to church. When things are good we can be tempted to focus on enjoying the good times and forget about God. We can forget to pray, get to busy to go to church.
During the hard times we can be tempted to feel like God has forgotten about us or worse that he is just standing by letting us just work out things for ourselves. Sometimes we are under pressure we feel like we are just keeping our head above water. And then when we are struck by financial, family or health problems God seems like he is a long way away and it feels like he just leaves us to work out our problems ourself.
What we will learn tonight is to keep sight of God in the good times and the hard times keep focused on the promises of God because he is the God who keeps his promises. So that in both good times and hard times we can not loose sight of God.
We will see this principle at work in the very first 2 chapters of Exodus.

2 Stories

Genesis 1:27 NIV
So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them.
Then Matt showed us last week that it only took 2 chapters for the first 2 people, Adam and Eve to challenge God’s authority and sin against him.
That began a steep decline. Sin increased in every Generation until in God regretted that he had made human beings on the earth. In God brings a great flood to rid the earth of the sin that humans had spread.
Yet as Matt said we see God’s salvation in this Judgement. He saved the family of Noah. This family started again, living under the rainbow that was a promise to humans forever that never again would God flood the whole earth.
He brought a great flood to rid the earth of the sin that humans had spread. Yet as Matt said we see God’ salvation in this Judgement. He saved one family, the family of Noah. This family started again, living under the rainbow that was a promise to humans forever that never again would God flood the whole earth.
Yet in just a short time later again humans challenge God. They built an enormous tower at Babal to challenge God’s authority. Again God Judges the the human race. But this time he scatters them and confuses their language so they don’t all have the same language anymore.
It was after this even that we meet Abraham and his wife Sarah. Again as Matt shared with us last week, God called Abraham and promised him 3 great promises.
Genesis 12:2–3 NIV
2 “I will make you into a great nation, and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. 3 I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you.”
Gen 12:2-
Galatians 3:16 NIV
The promises were spoken to Abraham and to his seed. Scripture does not say “and to seeds,” meaning many people, but “and to your seed,” meaning one person, who is Christ.
1:1–2:25
Gal 3:16
The Growth and Oppression of Israel in Egypt
nation: 70 v5
1:1–2:25
land: just the grave of Abraham and Sarah, defendants are in Eygpt
Blessing: Joseph, what men meant for evil God used for good.
1:1–2:25
The first 2 chapters of Exodus gives us the Setting of the book, the growth and oppression of Israel in Egypt.
The Setting: Growth and Oppression of Israel in Egypt
Here we see the two biggest stories that make up the setting for the exodus:

(ch. 1)
The Israelites multiply under Pharaoh who enslaves them. He also tries in vain to control their population through infanticide

Enter Moses

(ch. 2)
1. Enter Moses, an Israelite who grows up as a privileged Egyptian but sides with his own people (2:1–15)
2. Years later, as an escaped elderly outlaw settled in Sinai. (2:16–22)
(2:1–15).
3. He is a most unlikely candidate for the role of deliverer of Israel, picking up a central motif from Genesis. (2: 23–25)
(vv. 16–22)Years later, as an escaped elderly outlaw settled in Sinai, he is a most unlikely candidate for the role of deliverer of Israel (vv. 23–25), picking up a central motif from Genesis.
(1) Story 1: the growth and the subjection of the Israelites under Pharaoh, including infanticide in a vain attempt to control their population (ch. 1);
(2) Story 2: enter Moses, an Israelite who grows up as a privileged Egyptian but sides with his own people (2:1–15).
Years later, as an escaped elderly outlaw settled in Sinai (vv. 16–22),
Years later, as an escaped elderly outlaw settled in Sinai (vv. 16–22),
he is a most unlikely candidate for the role of deliverer of Israel (vv. 23–25), picking up a central motif from Genesis.
So let’s have a look at these 2 stories.

Story 1: The Growth and Subjection of Israel

How did the People of Israel come to Eygpt?

Ex 1:1-6
Exodus 1:1–5 NIV
1 These are the names of the sons of Israel who went to Egypt with Jacob, each with his family: 2 Reuben, Simeon, Levi and Judah; 3 Issachar, Zebulun and Benjamin; 4 Dan and Naphtali; Gad and Asher. 5 The descendants of Jacob numbered seventy in all; Joseph was already in Egypt.
Exodus 1:1

How did the People of Israel come to Eygpt?

Here we see the connecting story with Genisis that continues the story that started in exodus 12.
This is the brief story of how 2 generations after Moses the decendants of Abraham added up to 70 people. This is the story of how they came to be in Eygpt.
Jacob loved his son Jospeh. His older brothers grew jeleous and ironically sold him into slavery. Joseph ended up in Eygpt and rose from being a slave to being a powerful advisor of Pharo.
When there was a famum in the land his brothers came seeking aid and Joseph forgives them and helps them settle in Eygpt.
Verse 5 tells us: They number seventy people.
The hebrew word for decendants litterally means:
“Thus the full offspring of the loins of Jacob was seventy souls in all,”
So the great nation of Israel who would be rescued by God began with only 70 people. But these people would multiply in Eygpt.

How did the People of Israel became Slaves in Egypt?

Let’s pick up the story in verse 6:
Exodus 1:6–10 NIV
6 Now Joseph and all his brothers and all that generation died, 7 but the Israelites were exceedingly fruitful; they multiplied greatly, increased in numbers and became so numerous that the land was filled with them. 8 Then a new king, to whom Joseph meant nothing, came to power in Egypt. 9 “Look,” he said to his people, “the Israelites have become far too numerous for us. 10 Come, we must deal shrewdly with them or they will become even more numerous and, if war breaks out, will join our enemies, fight against us and leave the country.”
Exodus 1:6
After Joseph has died and a new Pharo is on the throne he sees the Israelites as a growing threat.

Ex 1:7-14
So in verse 11
Exodus 1:11 NIV
11 So they put slave masters over them to oppress them with forced labor, and they built Pithom and Rameses as store cities for Pharaoh.
Yet they continue to multiply. The more they were oppressed the more the people grew until

The Pharo commands the Jewish boys to be killed?

(1:15-22)
Exodus 1:15–22 NIV
15 The king of Egypt said to the Hebrew midwives, whose names were Shiphrah and Puah, 16 “When you are helping the Hebrew women during childbirth on the delivery stool, if you see that the baby is a boy, kill him; but if it is a girl, let her live.” 17 The midwives, however, feared God and did not do what the king of Egypt had told them to do; they let the boys live. 18 Then the king of Egypt summoned the midwives and asked them, “Why have you done this? Why have you let the boys live?” 19 The midwives answered Pharaoh, “Hebrew women are not like Egyptian women; they are vigorous and give birth before the midwives arrive.” 20 So God was kind to the midwives and the people increased and became even more numerous. 21 And because the midwives feared God, he gave them families of their own. 22 Then Pharaoh gave this order to all his people: “Every Hebrew boy that is born you must throw into the Nile, but let every girl live.”
The king tells the midwives to kill new born boys, but they disobeyed.
Exodus 1:19–21 NIV
19 The midwives answered Pharaoh, “Hebrew women are not like Egyptian women; they are vigorous and give birth before the midwives arrive.” 20 So God was kind to the midwives and the people increased and became even more numerous. 21 And because the midwives feared God, he gave them families of their own.
Exodus 1:19–20 NIV
19 The midwives answered Pharaoh, “Hebrew women are not like Egyptian women; they are vigorous and give birth before the midwives arrive.” 20 So God was kind to the midwives and the people increased and became even more numerous.
ex 1:
Exodus 1:19–22 NIV
19 The midwives answered Pharaoh, “Hebrew women are not like Egyptian women; they are vigorous and give birth before the midwives arrive.” 20 So God was kind to the midwives and the people increased and became even more numerous. 21 And because the midwives feared God, he gave them families of their own. 22 Then Pharaoh gave this order to all his people: “Every Hebrew boy that is born you must throw into the Nile, but let every girl live.”
ex 1:19-
Bravery of the midwives,
Actually telling the truth not liing. The Israelites were giving birth before eygptians.
Their bravery was to stand up to telling the truth.
God blesses them they have childen
In Verses 22 Pharo says to just kill the boys

How Did Moses Escape this Death Sentance?

2:1-10

2. Story 2: Enter Moses

How Did Moses Escape this Death Sentance?

2:1-10
Exodus 2:1–10 NIV
1 Now a man of the tribe of Levi married a Levite woman, 2 and she became pregnant and gave birth to a son. When she saw that he was a fine child, she hid him for three months. 3 But when she could hide him no longer, she got a papyrus basket for him and coated it with tar and pitch. Then she placed the child in it and put it among the reeds along the bank of the Nile. 4 His sister stood at a distance to see what would happen to him. 5 Then Pharaoh’s daughter went down to the Nile to bathe, and her attendants were walking along the riverbank. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her female slave to get it. 6 She opened it and saw the baby. He was crying, and she felt sorry for him. “This is one of the Hebrew babies,” she said. 7 Then his sister asked Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get one of the Hebrew women to nurse the baby for you?” 8 “Yes, go,” she answered. So the girl went and got the baby’s mother. 9 Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this baby and nurse him for me, and I will pay you.” So the woman took the baby and nursed him. 10 When the child grew older, she took him to Pharaoh’s daughter and he became her son. She named him Moses, saying, “I drew him out of the water.”

How did Moses come to run away?

2:11-22
a. 2:11-15 Story skips ahead 30 years. Like Jesus who later the story skips ahead 30 yars.
He was brought up an eygptian but identifies with the israelites.
Murders a slave driver and runs away
b. 2:16-19
encounter at the well of mideon
Exodus 2:16–19 NIV
16 Now a priest of Midian had seven daughters, and they came to draw water and fill the troughs to water their father’s flock. 17 Some shepherds came along and drove them away, but Moses got up and came to their rescue and watered their flock. 18 When the girls returned to Reuel their father, he asked them, “Why have you returned so early today?” 19 They answered, “An Egyptian rescued us from the shepherds. He even drew water for us and watered the flock.”
In 2:20-22 Moses settles down as a part of Jethro’s family and marries Zipporah and has his first child
Exodus 2:22 NIV
22 Zipporah gave birth to a son, and Moses named him Gershom, saying, “I have become a foreigner in a foreign land.”
He has become a perminent resident. That is where the story may have ended. Moses could have gone on to live in obscurity. However:
Exodus 2:23–25 NIV
23 During that long period, the king of Egypt died. The Israelites groaned in their slavery and cried out, and their cry for help because of their slavery went up to God. 24 God heard their groaning and he remembered his covenant with Abraham, with Isaac and with Jacob. 25 So God looked on the Israelites and was concerned about them.
We are being prepared for what happens next.
The people begin to pray for help.
Heard and remembered, did not forget he was remembering his promise to Abraham in .
Later in Deuteronomy Moses recalls this.
Deuteronomy 26:7 NIV
7 Then we cried out to the Lord, the God of our ancestors, and the Lord heard our voice and saw our misery, toil and oppression.
Deut 26:7
Galatians 3:16 NIV
The promises were spoken to Abraham and to his seed. Scripture does not say “and to seeds,” meaning many people, but “and to your seed,” meaning one person, who is Christ.
How to Read the Bible Book by Book 1:1–2:25 the Setting: Growth and Oppression of Israel in Egypt

1:1–2:25

The Setting: Growth and Oppression of Israel in Egypt

Here you find the two primary narratives that comprise the setting for the exodus: (1) the multiplication and subjection of the Israelites under Pharaoh, including infanticide in a vain attempt to control their population (ch. 1); (2) enter Moses, an Israelite who grows up as a privileged Egyptian but sides with his own people (2:1–15). Years later, as an escaped elderly outlaw settled in Sinai (vv. 16–22), he is a most unlikely candidate for the role of deliverer of Israel (vv. 23–25), picking up a central motif from Genesis.

The Promise to Abraham:
nation: 70 v5
land: just the grave of Abraham and Sarah, defendants are in Eygpt
Blessing: Joseph, what men meant for evil God used for good.
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