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To Love is to Forgive

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Even after we have been wronged we can show love and forgiveness to others.

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Have you ever been wronged by someone? Has someone done something to you that you find unforgivable? Do you find it difficult to forgive others? Have you ever been in conflict with someone that seems like it never ends…..it’s on going…..you can’t seem to shake it….you can’t seem to make it go away…..there’s no end in sight…its just one conflict after another with the same person? Do you and your spouse frequently find disagreement over one thing or another and have a hard time getting over it? Have you had a family member, or a friend, or a colleague suddenly stop talking to you and shut off all communication with you over an argument? Have you been a part of an issue at church that caused a church split? Have you had a teenaged child, or a brother, or sister, or family member run off and go live somewhere else…and you don’t know where they are because they don’t want you to know? It’s likely safe to say one or more of the questions presented have happened to you at some point in your life. I am sure not a day goes by when you feel like someone has done something to you or said something to you or about you that you don’t like. There are people you know that may even live in a constant state of conflict…..do you know people like that?
Personally over the years, I’ve had or been witness to plenty of conflict. As a teenager I had conflict with girlfriends that caused the relationships to become nonexistent. As a twenty something in the Air Force I experienced or witnessed conflict between supervisors and coworkers that eroded communication and unit effectiveness. In my 30’s I had a marriage fall apart due to conflict and selfishness, and almost saw an end to another marriage. In my 40’s I’ve lost relationships with friends and family members because I confessed with my mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in my heart that God raised Him from the dead. I know of parents that don’t speak to their adult children because they don’t like their child’s wife or husband. I’ve had friends and coworkers whose spouse left without a trace due to conflict in their marriages. I’ve seen supervisors treat their employees like personal servants or like sub-human worthless beings….like they’re nothing. I could go on and on…….but we’ve all experienced or been witness to break ups, been hated by others, treated like we don’t matter, or have lost relationships for one reason or another. Does that seem true for you?
Personally over the years, I’ve had or been witness to plenty of conflict. As a teenager I had conflict with girlfriends that caused the relationships to become nonexistent. As a twenty something in the Air Force I experienced or witnessed conflict between supervisors and coworkers that eroded communication and unit effectiveness. In my 30’s I had a marriage fall apart due to conflict and selfishness, and almost saw an end to another marriage. In my 40’s I’ve lost relationships with friends and family members because I confessed with my mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in my heart that God raised Him from the dead. I know of parents that don’t speak to their adult children because they don’t like their child’s wife or husband. I’ve had friends and coworkers whose spouse left without a trace due to conflict in their marriages. I’ve seen supervisors treat their employees like personal servants or like sub-human worthless beings….like they’re nothing. I could go on and on…….but we’ve all experienced or been witness to break ups, been hated by others, treated like we don’t matter, or have lost relationships for one reason or another. Does that seem true for you?
Personally over the years, I’ve had or been witness to plenty of conflict. As a teenager I had conflict with girlfriends that caused the relationships to become nonexistent. As a twenty something in the Air Force I experienced or witnessed conflict between supervisors and coworkers that eroded communication and unit effectiveness. In my 30’s I had a marriage fall apart due to conflict and selfishness, and almost saw an end to another marriage. In my 40’s I’ve lost relationships with friends and family members because I confessed with my mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in my heart that God raised Him from the dead. I know of parents that don’t speak to their adult children because they don’t like their child’s wife or husband. I’ve had friends and coworkers whose spouse left without a trace due to conflict in their marriages. I’ve seen supervisors treat their employees like personal servants or like sub-human worthless beings….like they’re nothing. I could go on and on…….but we’ve all experienced or been witness to break ups, been hated by others, treated like we don’t matter, or have lost relationships for one reason or another. Does that seem true for you?
Personally over the years, I’ve had or been witness to plenty of conflict. As a teenager I had conflict with girlfriends that caused the relationships to become nonexistent. As a twenty something in the Air Force I experienced or witnessed conflict between supervisors and coworkers that eroded communication and unit effectiveness. In my 30’s I had a marriage fall apart due to conflict and selfishness, and almost saw an end to another marriage. In my 40’s I’ve lost relationships with friends and family members because I confessed with my mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in my heart that God raised Him from the dead. I know of parents that don’t speak to their adult children because they don’t like their child’s wife or husband. I’ve had friends and coworkers whose spouse left without a trace due to conflict in their marriages. I’ve seen supervisors treat their employees like personal servants or like sub-human worthless beings….like they’re nothing. I could go on and on…….but we’ve all experienced or been witness to break ups, been hated by others, treated like we don’t matter, or have lost relationships for one reason or another. Does that seem true for you?
- A little exercise for you – please get out your pen and little slip of paper - now think of a person that wronged you that you have yet to forgive…..go ahead and write down that person’s name.
- A little exercise for you – please get out your pen and little slip of paper - now think of a person that wronged you that you have yet to forgive…..go ahead and write down that person’s name.
Personally over the years, I’ve had or been witness to plenty of conflict. As a teenager I had conflict with girlfriends that caused the relationships to become nonexistent. As a twenty something in the Air Force I experienced or witnessed conflict between supervisors and coworkers that eroded communication and unit effectiveness. In my 30’s I had a marriage fall apart due to conflict and selfishness, and almost saw an end to another marriage. In my 40’s I’ve lost relationships with friends and family members because I confessed with my mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in my heart that God raised Him from the dead. I know of parents that don’t speak to their adult children because they don’t like their child’s wife or husband. I’ve had friends and coworkers whose spouse left without a trace due to conflict in their marriages. I’ve seen supervisors treat their employees like personal servants or like sub-human worthless beings….like they’re nothing. I could go on and on…….but we’ve all experienced or been witness to break ups, been hated by others, treated like we don’t matter, or have lost relationships for one reason or another.
We’re going to spend the next two weeks talking about love, and fellowship, and forgiveness.
We’re going to spend the next two weeks talking about love, and fellowship, and forgiveness.
Personally over the years, I’ve had or been witness to plenty of conflict. As a teenager I had conflict with girlfriends that caused the relationships to become nonexistent. As a twenty something in the Air Force I experienced or witnessed conflict between supervisors and coworkers that eroded communication and unit effectiveness. In my 30’s I had a marriage fall apart due to conflict and selfishness, and almost saw an end to another marriage. In my 40’s I’ve lost relationships with friends and family members because I confessed with my mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in my heart that God raised Him from the dead. I know of parents that don’t speak to their adult children because they don’t like their child’s wife or husband. I’ve had friends and coworkers whose spouse left without a trace due to conflict in their marriages. I’ve seen supervisors treat their employees like personal servants or like sub-human worthless beings….like they’re nothing. I could go on and on…….but we’ve all experienced or been witness to break ups, been hated by others, treated like we don’t matter, or have lost relationships for one reason or another. Does that seem true for you?
We’re going to spend the next two weeks talking about love, and fellowship, and forgiveness.
Personally over the years, I’ve had or been witness to plenty of conflict. As a teenager I had conflict with girlfriends that caused the relationships to become nonexistent. As a twenty something in the Air Force I experienced or witnessed conflict between supervisors and coworkers that eroded communication and unit effectiveness. In my 30’s I had a marriage fall apart due to conflict and selfishness, and almost saw an end to another marriage. In my 40’s I’ve lost relationships with friends and family members because I confessed with my mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in my heart that God raised Him from the dead. I know of parents that don’t speak to their adult children because they don’t like their child’s wife or husband. I’ve had friends and coworkers whose spouse left without a trace due to conflict in their marriages. I’ve seen supervisors treat their employees like personal servants or like sub-human worthless beings….like they’re nothing. I could go on and on…….but we’ve all experienced or been witness to break ups, been hated by others, treated like we don’t matter, or have lost relationships for one reason or another. Does that seem true for you?
We’re going to spend the next two weeks talking about love, and fellowship, and forgiveness.
We’re going to spend the next two weeks talking about love, and fellowship, and forgiveness.
We’re going to spend the next two weeks talking about love, and fellowship, and forgiveness.
We’ll talk about love because “God is love” (), and “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” ().
We’ll talk about love because “God is love” (), and “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” ().
We’re going to spend the next two weeks talking about love, and fellowship, and forgiveness.
We’ll talk about love because “God is love” (), and “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” ().
We’ll talk about love because “God is love” (1 John 4:8b), and “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16).
We’ll talk about love because “God is love” (), and “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” ().
We’ll talk about fellowship because “…if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 ) and because the first Christians “…devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” ()
We’ll talk about fellowship because “…if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 ) and because the first Christians “…devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” ()
We’ll talk about fellowship because “…if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 ) and because the first Christians “…devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” ()
We’ll talk about fellowship because “…if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 ) and because the first Christians “…devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” ()
We’ll talk about love because “God is love” (), and “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” ().
We’ll talk about love because “God is love” (), and “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” ().
Fellowship because “…if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 John 1:17) and because the first Christians “…devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” (Acts 2:42)
And forgiveness “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” ()
And forgiveness “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” ()
And forgiveness “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” ()
We’ll talk about fellowship because “…if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 ) and because the first Christians “…devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” ()
We’ll talk about fellowship because “…if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. (1 ) and because the first Christians “…devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” ()
And forgiveness “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” ()
And forgiveness “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” (Matthew 6:14-15)
We’re going to talk about these subjects as we unpack a little letter written by the Apostle Paul to his brother in Christ, named Philemon.
We’re going to talk about these subjects as we unpack a little letter written by the Apostle Paul to his brother in Christ, named Philemon.
And forgiveness “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” ()
We’re going to talk about these subjects as we unpack a little letter written by the Apostle Paul to his brother in Christ, named Philemon.
We’re going to talk about these subjects as we unpack a little letter written by the Apostle Paul to his brother in Christ, named Philemon.
We’re going to talk about these subjects as we unpack a little letter written by the Apostle Paul to his brother in Christ, named Philemon.
And forgiveness “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” ()
We’re going to talk about these subjects as we unpack a little letter written by the Apostle Paul to his brother in Christ, named Philemon.
The Letter of Paul to Philemon is a one-page, New Testament letter that sits between The Letter of Paul to Titus and The Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter to Philemon was written while Paul was in a Roman prison around AD 60. Paul wrote the letter around the same time as he wrote the letters of Philippians, Ephesians, and Colossians – all known as the prison letters. In the original Greek text, the letter contains 335 words making it the shortest of all Paul’s letters. Only Second and Third John contain less words in the Greek or Hebrew out of the entire Bible. Philemon contains approximately 460 words in the English Standard Version of the Bible, which is the version we use at LifeSpring. The main figures mentioned in the letter are Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. We all know the Apostle Paul – originally a Pharisee, an expert in the Jewish Old Testament law, a persecutor of Christians that eventually became a Christian after his experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus, an apostle to the gentiles, and inspired writer of most of the New Testament. Philemon was a gentile follower of Jesus that lived near Colossae – which is in present day southwestern Turkey. Philemon also had slaves, or bondservants, or indentured servants. Onesimus, which means “useful” or “beneficial,” was Philemon’s slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and eventually found the Apostle Paul. Onesimus became a follower of Jesus while with Paul in Paul’s imprisonment. It’s through the mention of Onesimus in the Letter to the Colossians that we know Philemon and Onesimus are from the area around Colossae. Onesimus may have first met Paul with Philemon during a visit to Ephesus. At the time he first met Paul, Onesimus was not a Christian. He became a Christian in Rome where he found Paul and stayed with Paul during his imprisonment. It appears that Onesimus accompanied Tychicus back to Colossae which is seen in Colossians chapter 4 verses 7 through 9. In it Paul says, “Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.”
The Letter of Paul to Philemon is a one-page, New Testament letter that sits between The Letter of Paul to Titus and The Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter to Philemon was written while Paul was in a Roman prison around AD 60. Paul wrote the letter around the same time as he wrote the letters of Philippians, Ephesians, and Colossians – all known as the prison letters. In the original Greek text, the letter contains 335 words making it the shortest of all Paul’s letters. Only Second and Third John contain less words in the Greek or Hebrew out of the entire Bible. Philemon contains approximately 460 words in the English Standard Version of the Bible, which is the version we use at LifeSpring. The main figures mentioned in the letter are Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. We all know the Apostle Paul – originally a Pharisee, an expert in the Jewish Old Testament law, a persecutor of Christians that eventually became a Christian after his experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus, an apostle to the gentiles, and inspired writer of most of the New Testament. Philemon was a gentile follower of Jesus that lived near Colossae – which is in present day southwestern Turkey. Philemon also had slaves, or bondservants, or indentured servants. Onesimus, which means “useful” or “beneficial,” was Philemon’s slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and eventually found the Apostle Paul. Onesimus became a follower of Jesus while with Paul in Paul’s imprisonment. It’s through the mention of Onesimus in the Letter to the Colossians that we know Philemon and Onesimus are from the area around Colossae. Onesimus may have first met Paul with Philemon during a visit to Ephesus. At the time he first met Paul, Onesimus was not a Christian. He became a Christian in Rome where he found Paul and stayed with Paul during his imprisonment. It appears that Onesimus accompanied Tychicus back to Colossae which is seen in Colossians chapter 4 verses 7 through 9. In it Paul says, “Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.”
The Letter of Paul to Philemon is a one-page, New Testament letter that sits between The Letter of Paul to Titus and The Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter to Philemon was written while Paul was in a Roman prison around AD 60. Paul wrote the letter around the same time as he wrote the letters of Philippians, Ephesians, and Colossians – all known as the prison letters. In the original Greek text, the letter contains 335 words making it the shortest of all Paul’s letters. Only Second and Third John contain less words in the Greek or Hebrew out of the entire Bible. Philemon contains approximately 460 words in the English Standard Version of the Bible, which is the version we use at LifeSpring. The main figures mentioned in the letter are Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. We all know the Apostle Paul – originally a Pharisee, an expert in the Jewish Old Testament law, a persecutor of Christians that eventually became a Christian after his experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus, an apostle to the gentiles, and inspired writer of most of the New Testament. Philemon was a gentile follower of Jesus that lived near Colossae – which is in present day southwestern Turkey. Philemon also had slaves, or bondservants, or indentured servants. Onesimus, which means “useful” or “beneficial,” was Philemon’s slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and eventually found the Apostle Paul. Onesimus became a follower of Jesus while with Paul in Paul’s imprisonment. It’s through the mention of Onesimus in the Letter to the Colossians that we know Philemon and Onesimus are from the area around Colossae. Onesimus may have first met Paul with Philemon during a visit to Ephesus. At the time he first met Paul, Onesimus was not a Christian. He became a Christian in Rome where he found Paul and stayed with Paul during his imprisonment. It appears that Onesimus accompanied Tychicus back to Colossae which is seen in Colossians chapter 4 verses 7 through 9. In it Paul says, “Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.”
The Letter of Paul to Philemon is a one-page, New Testament letter that sits between The Letter of Paul to Titus and The Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter to Philemon was written while Paul was in a Roman prison around AD 60. Paul wrote the letter around the same time as he wrote the letters of Philippians, Ephesians, and Colossians – all known as the prison letters. In the Greek, the letter contains 335 words making it the shortest of all Paul’s letters. Only Second and Third John contain less words in the Greek or Hebrew out of the entire Bible. Philemon contains approximately 460 words in the English Standard Version of the Bible. The main figures mentioned in the letter are Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. We all know the Apostle Paul – originally a Pharisee, an expert in the Jewish Old Testament law, a persecutor of Christians that eventually became a Christian after his experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus. Philemon was a gentile follower of Jesus that lived near Colossae – which is in present day southwestern Turkey. Philemon also had slaves, or bondservants, or indentured servants. Onesimus, which means “useful” or “beneficial,” was Philemon’s slave, bondservant, indentured servant that ran away and eventually found the Apostle Paul. Onesimus became a follower of Jesus while with Paul in his imprisonment. It’s through the mention of Onesimus in the Letter to the Colossians that we know Philemon and Onesimus are from the area around Colossae. Onesimus may have first met Paul with Philemon during a visit to Ephesus. At the time he first met Paul, Onesimus was not a Christian. He became a Christian in Rome where he found Paul and stayed with Paul during his imprisonment. It appears that Onesimus accompanied Tychicus back to Colossae which is seen in Colossians chapter 4 verses 7 through 9. In it Paul says, “Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.
We’re going to talk about these subjects as we unpack a little letter written by the Apostle Paul to his brother in Christ, named Philemon.
The Letter of Paul to Philemon is a one-page, New Testament letter that sits between The Letter of Paul to Titus and The Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter to Philemon was written while Paul was in a Roman prison around AD 60. Paul wrote the letter around the same time as he wrote the letters of Philippians, Ephesians, and Colossians – all known as the prison letters. In the original Greek text, the letter contains 335 words making it the shortest of all Paul’s letters. Only Second and Third John contain less words in the Greek or Hebrew out of the entire Bible. Philemon contains approximately 460 words in the English Standard Version of the Bible, which is the version we use at LifeSpring. The main figures mentioned in the letter are Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. We all know the Apostle Paul – originally a Pharisee, an expert in the Jewish Old Testament law, a persecutor of Christians that eventually became a Christian after his experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus, an apostle to the gentiles, and inspired writer of most of the New Testament. Philemon was a gentile follower of Jesus that lived near Colossae – which is in present day southwestern Turkey. Philemon also had slaves, or bondservants, or indentured servants. Onesimus, which means “useful” or “beneficial,” was Philemon’s slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and eventually found the Apostle Paul. Onesimus became a follower of Jesus while with Paul in Paul’s imprisonment. It’s through the mention of Onesimus in the Letter to the Colossians that we know Philemon and Onesimus are from the area around Colossae. Onesimus may have first met Paul with Philemon during a visit to Ephesus. At the time he first met Paul, Onesimus was not a Christian. He became a Christian in Rome where he found Paul and stayed with Paul during his imprisonment. It appears that Onesimus accompanied Tychicus back to Colossae which is seen in Colossians chapter 4 verses 7 through 9. In it Paul says, “Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.”
This indicates that either Tychicus or even Onesimus carried Paul’s letter to Philemon and delivered it to him. In the Colossian verses, Paul is saying that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – is loved by Paul – and is a Colossian……one of the members of the church in Colossae…..because that’s where he’s from…he’s going back….he’s no different than the rest of you in the Colossian church….therefore welcome him as you would any brother or sister in Christ Jesus. Onesimus, though a slave and has a different standing according to Roman Law and custom, is one of you.
This indicates that either Tychicus or even Onesimus carried Paul’s letter to Philemon and delivered it to him. In the Colossian verses, Paul is saying that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – is loved by Paul – and is a Colossian……one of the members of the church in Colossae…..because that’s where he’s from…he’s going back….he’s no different than the rest of you in the Colossian church….therefore welcome him as you would any brother or sister in Christ Jesus. Onesimus, though a slave and has a different standing according to Roman Law and custom, is one of you.
This indicates that either Tychicus or even Onesimus carried the letter to Philemon and delivered it to him. Paul is saying that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – is loved by Paul – and is a Colossian……one of the members of the church in Colossae…..because that’s where he’s from…he’s going back….he’s no different than the rest of you in the Colossian church….therefore welcome him as you would any brother or sister in Christ Jesus.
This indicates that either Tychicus or even Onesimus carried Paul’s letter to Philemon and delivered it to him. In the Colossian verses, Paul is saying that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – is loved by Paul – and is a Colossian……one of the members of the church in Colossae…..because that’s where he’s from…he’s going back….he’s no different than the rest of you in the Colossian church….therefore welcome him as you would any brother or sister in Christ Jesus. Onesimus, though a slave and has a different standing according to Roman Law and custom, is one of you.
This indicates that either Tychicus or even Onesimus carried Paul’s letter to Philemon and delivered it to him. In the Colossian verses, Paul is saying that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – is loved by Paul – and is a Colossian……one of the members of the church in Colossae…..because that’s where he’s from…he’s going back….he’s no different than the rest of you in the Colossian church….therefore welcome him as you would any brother or sister in Christ Jesus. Onesimus, though a slave and has a different standing according to Roman Law and custom, is one of you.
The Letter of Paul to Philemon is a one-page, New Testament letter that sits between The Letter of Paul to Titus and The Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter to Philemon was written while Paul was in a Roman prison around AD 60. Paul wrote the letter around the same time as he wrote the letters of Philippians, Ephesians, and Colossians – all known as the prison letters. In the original Greek text, the letter contains 335 words making it the shortest of all Paul’s letters. Only Second and Third John contain less words in the Greek or Hebrew out of the entire Bible. Philemon contains approximately 460 words in the English Standard Version of the Bible, which is the version we use at LifeSpring. The main figures mentioned in the letter are Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. We all know the Apostle Paul – originally a Pharisee, an expert in the Jewish Old Testament law, a persecutor of Christians that eventually became a Christian after his experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus, an apostle to the gentiles, and inspired writer of most of the New Testament. Philemon was a gentile follower of Jesus that lived near Colossae – which is in present day southwestern Turkey. Philemon also had slaves, or bondservants, or indentured servants. Onesimus, which means “useful” or “beneficial,” was Philemon’s slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and eventually found the Apostle Paul. Onesimus became a follower of Jesus while with Paul in Paul’s imprisonment. It’s through the mention of Onesimus in the Letter to the Colossians that we know Philemon and Onesimus are from the area around Colossae. Onesimus may have first met Paul with Philemon during a visit to Ephesus. At the time he first met Paul, Onesimus was not a Christian. He became a Christian in Rome where he found Paul and stayed with Paul during his imprisonment. It appears that Onesimus accompanied Tychicus back to Colossae which is seen in Colossians chapter 4 verses 7 through 9. In it Paul says, “Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.”
The Letter of Paul to Philemon is a one-page, New Testament letter that sits between The Letter of Paul to Titus and The Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter to Philemon was written while Paul was in a Roman prison around AD 60. Paul wrote the letter around the same time as he wrote the letters of Philippians, Ephesians, and Colossians – all known as the prison letters. In the original Greek text, the letter contains 335 words making it the shortest of all Paul’s letters. Only Second and Third John contain less words in the Greek or Hebrew out of the entire Bible. Philemon contains approximately 460 words in the English Standard Version of the Bible, which is the version we use at LifeSpring. The main figures mentioned in the letter are Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. We all know the Apostle Paul – originally a Pharisee, an expert in the Jewish Old Testament law, a persecutor of Christians that eventually became a Christian after his experience with Jesus on the road to Damascus, an apostle to the gentiles, and inspired writer of most of the New Testament. Philemon was a gentile follower of Jesus that lived near Colossae – which is in present day southwestern Turkey. Philemon also had slaves, or bondservants, or indentured servants. Onesimus, which means “useful” or “beneficial,” was Philemon’s slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and eventually found the Apostle Paul. Onesimus became a follower of Jesus while with Paul in Paul’s imprisonment. It’s through the mention of Onesimus in the Letter to the Colossians that we know Philemon and Onesimus are from the area around Colossae. Onesimus may have first met Paul with Philemon during a visit to Ephesus. At the time he first met Paul, Onesimus was not a Christian. He became a Christian in Rome where he found Paul and stayed with Paul during his imprisonment. It appears that Onesimus accompanied Tychicus back to Colossae which is seen in Colossians chapter 4 verses 7 through 9. In it Paul says, “Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.”
This indicates that either Tychicus or even Onesimus carried Paul’s letter to Philemon and delivered it to him. In the Colossian verses, Paul is saying that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – is loved by Paul – and is a Colossian……one of the members of the church in Colossae…..because that’s where he’s from…he’s going back….he’s no different than the rest of you in the Colossian church….therefore welcome him as you would any brother or sister in Christ Jesus. Onesimus, though a slave and has a different standing according to Roman Law and custom, is one of you.
The letter of Philemon has three parts; the first part being the salutation, thanksgiving and prayer, the second being three appeals Paul makes on behalf of Onesimus, and the last part being the closing. The letter to Philemon is a rich and awesome piece of scripture……so much of what it means to be a Christian is packed into this small one page letter…….through it you can see the Gospel….you can clearly see how Christians are to interact with one another, you see love, you see free will, you see the need to make right choices, you see obedience to our Savior, you see the Christian heart. What you don’t see is judgement, you don’t see hate, you don’t see an affirmation of slavery, you don’t see intimidation, you don’t see someone using their authority to hold down others, you don’t see the need for religious tests, and you don’t see any finger pointing. What you do see is most everything Jesus taught during His ministry on this earth……you do see Jesus….…you see perfect unity with the small one page letter of Philemon and the rest of the Bible…..you see God’s sovereignty…His love and mercy and grace that He freely gives to everyone that seeks His forgiveness……it is there for anyone that has ever or continues to run away from Jesus.
The letter of Philemon has three parts; the first part being the salutation, thanksgiving and prayer, the second being three appeals Paul makes on behalf of Onesimus, and the last part being the closing. The letter to Philemon is a rich and awesome piece of scripture……so much of what it means to be a Christian is packed into this small one page letter…….through it you can see the Gospel….you can clearly see how Christians are to interact with one another, you see love, you see free will, you see the need to make right choices, you see obedience to our Savior, you see the Christian heart. What you don’t see is judgement, you don’t see hate, you don’t see an affirmation of slavery, you don’t see intimidation, you don’t see someone using their authority to hold down others, you don’t see the need for religious tests, and you don’t see any finger pointing. What you do see is most everything Jesus taught during His ministry on this earth……you do see Jesus….…you see perfect unity with the small one page letter of Philemon and the rest of the Bible…..you see God’s sovereignty…His love and mercy and grace that He freely gives to everyone that seeks His forgiveness……it is there for anyone that has ever or continues to run away from Jesus.
The letter of Philemon has three parts; the first part being the salutation, thanksgiving and prayer, the second being three appeals Paul makes on behalf of Onesimus, and the last part being the closing. The letter to Philemon is a rich and awesome piece of scripture……so much of what it means to be a Christian is packed into this small one page letter…….through it you can see the Gospel….you can clearly see how Christians are to interact with one another, you see love, you see free will, you see the need to make right choices, you see obedience to our Savior, you see the Christian heart. What you don’t see is judgement, you don’t see hate, you don’t see an affirmation of slavery, you don’t see intimidation, you don’t see someone using their authority to hold down others, you don’t see the need for religious tests, and you don’t see any finger pointing. What you do see is most everything Jesus taught during His ministry on this earth……you do see Jesus….…you see perfect unity with the small one page letter of Philemon and the rest of the Bible…..you see God’s sovereignty…His love and mercy and grace that He freely gives to everyone that seeks His forgiveness……it is there for anyone that has ever or continues to run away from Jesus.
This indicates that either Tychicus or even Onesimus carried Paul’s letter to Philemon and delivered it to him. In the Colossian verses, Paul is saying that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – is loved by Paul – and is a Colossian……one of the members of the church in Colossae…..because that’s where he’s from…he’s going back….he’s no different than the rest of you in the Colossian church….therefore welcome him as you would any brother or sister in Christ Jesus. Onesimus, though a slave and has a different standing according to Roman Law and custom, is one of you.
The letter of Philemon has three parts; the first part being the salutation, thanksgiving and prayer, the second being three appeals Paul makes on behalf of Onesimus, and the last part being the closing. The letter to Philemon is a rich and awesome piece of scripture……so much of what it means to be a Christian is packed into this small one page letter…….through it you can see the Gospel….you can clearly see how Christians are to interact with one another, you see love, you see free will, you see the need to make right choices, you see obedience to our Savior, you see the Christian heart. What you don’t see is judgement, you don’t see hate, you don’t see an affirmation of slavery, you don’t see intimidation, you don’t see someone using their authority to hold down others, you don’t see the need for religious tests, and you don’t see any finger pointing. What you do see is most everything Jesus taught during His ministry on this earth……you do see Jesus….…you see perfect unity with the small one page letter of Philemon and the rest of the Bible…..you see God’s sovereignty…His love and mercy and grace that He freely gives to everyone that seeks His forgiveness……it is there for anyone that has ever or continues to run away from Jesus.
The letter of Philemon has three parts; the first part being the salutation, thanksgiving and prayer, the second being three appeals Paul makes on behalf of Onesimus, and the last part being the closing. The letter to Philemon is a rich and awesome piece of scripture……so much of what it means to be a Christian is packed into this small one page letter…….through it you can see the Gospel….you can clearly see how Christians are to interact with one another, you see love, you see free will, you see the need to make right choices, you see obedience to our Savior, you see the Christian heart. What you don’t see is judgement, you don’t see hate, you don’t see an affirmation of slavery, you don’t see the need for religious tests, and you don’t see any finger pointing. What you do see is most everything Jesus taught during His ministry on this earth……you do see Jesus….…you see perfect unity with the small one page letter of Philemon and the rest of the Bible…..you see God’s sovereignty…His love and mercy and grace that He freely gives to everyone that seeks His forgiveness……it is there for anyone that has ever and continues to run away from Him.
Now that you have some back ground, let’s go ahead and jump into the text. Please open your Bibles to Philemon. Again, it’s in the New Testament towards the back of your Bible and sits between Titus and Hebrews…… or you can follow along on the screen. Though we’ll read the entire letter, we’re going to focus on the first 11 verses this week and the remainder the following week. So starting in verse 1…..
The letter of Philemon has three parts; the first part being the salutation, thanksgiving and prayer, the second being three appeals Paul makes on behalf of Onesimus, and the last part being the closing. The letter to Philemon is a rich and awesome piece of scripture……so much of what it means to be a Christian is packed into this small one page letter…….through it you can see the Gospel….you can clearly see how Christians are to interact with one another, you see love, you see free will, you see the need to make right choices, you see obedience to our Savior, you see the Christian heart. What you don’t see is judgement, you don’t see hate, you don’t see an affirmation of slavery, you don’t see intimidation, you don’t see someone using their authority to hold down others, you don’t see the need for religious tests, and you don’t see any finger pointing. What you do see is most everything Jesus taught during His ministry on this earth……you do see Jesus….…you see perfect unity with the small one page letter of Philemon and the rest of the Bible…..you see God’s sovereignty…His love and mercy and grace that He freely gives to everyone that seeks His forgiveness……it is there for anyone that has ever or continues to run away from Jesus.
The letter of Philemon has three parts; the first part being the salutation, thanksgiving and prayer, the second being three appeals Paul makes on behalf of Onesimus, and the last part being the closing. The letter to Philemon is a rich and awesome piece of scripture……so much of what it means to be a Christian is packed into this small one page letter…….through it you can see the Gospel….you can clearly see how Christians are to interact with one another, you see love, you see free will, you see the need to make right choices, you see obedience to our Savior, you see the Christian heart. What you don’t see is judgement, you don’t see hate, you don’t see an affirmation of slavery, you don’t see intimidation, you don’t see someone using their authority to hold down others, you don’t see the need for religious tests, and you don’t see any finger pointing. What you do see is most everything Jesus taught during His ministry on this earth……you do see Jesus….…you see perfect unity with the small one page letter of Philemon and the rest of the Bible…..you see God’s sovereignty…His love and mercy and grace that He freely gives to everyone that seeks His forgiveness……it is there for anyone that has ever or continues to run away from Jesus.
Now that you have some back ground, let’s go ahead and jump into the text. Please open your Bibles to Philemon. Again, it’s in the New Testament towards the back of your Bible and sits between Titus and Hebrews…… or you can follow along on the screen. Though we’ll read the entire letter, we’re going to focus on the first 11 verses this week and the remainder the following week. So starting in verse 1…..
Now that you have some back ground, let’s go ahead and jump into the text. Please open your Bibles to Philemon. Again, it’s in the New Testament towards the back of your Bible and sits between Titus and Hebrews…… or you can follow along on the screen. Though we’ll read the entire letter, we’re going to focus on the first 11 verses this week and the remainder the following week. So starting in verse 1…..
Now that you have some back ground, let’s go ahead and jump into the text. Please open your Bibles to Philemon. Again, it’s in the New Testament towards the back of your Bible and sits between Titus and Hebrews…… or you can follow along on the screen. Though we’ll read the entire letter, we’re going to focus on the first 11 verses this week and the remainder the following week. So starting in verse 1…..
Now that you have some back ground, let’s go ahead and jump into the text. Please open your Bibles to Philemon, again, it’s in the New Testament towards the back of your Bible and sits between Titus and Hebrews…… or you can follow along on the screen. Though we’ll read the entire letter, we’re going to focus on the first 11 verses this week and the remainder the following week. So starting in verse 1…..
Now that you have some back ground, let’s go ahead and jump into the text. Please open your Bibles to Philemon. Again, it’s in the New Testament towards the back of your Bible and sits between Titus and Hebrews…… or you can follow along on the screen. Though we’ll read the entire letter, we’re going to focus on the first 11 verses this week and the remainder the following week. So starting in verse 1…..
Paul, a prisoner for Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I thank my God always when I remember you in my prayers, because I hear of your love and of the faith that you have toward the Lord Jesus and for all the saints, and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ. For I have derived much joy and comfort from your love, my brother, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Accordingly, though I am bold enough in Christ to command you to do what is required, yet for love's sake I prefer to appeal to you—I, Paul, an old man and now a prisoner also for Christ Jesus— I appeal to you for my child, Onesimus, whose father I became in my imprisonment. (Formerly he was useless to you, but now he is indeed useful to you and to me.) I am sending him back to you, sending my very heart. I would have been glad to keep him with me, in order that he might serve me on your behalf during my imprisonment for the gospel, but I preferred to do nothing without your consent in order that your goodness might not be by compulsion but of your own accord. For this perhaps is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back forever, no longer as a bondservant but more than a bondservant, as a beloved brother—especially to me, but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. So if you consider me your partner, receive him as you would receive me. If he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, charge that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it—to say nothing of your owing me even your own self. Yes, brother, I want some benefit from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in Christ. Confident of your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say. At the same time, prepare a guest room for me, for I am hoping that through your prayers I will be graciously given to you. Epaphras, my fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus, sends greetings to you, and so do Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke, my fellow workers. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”
Paul, a prisoner for Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I thank my God always when I remember you in my prayers, because I hear of your love and of the faith that you have toward the Lord Jesus and for all the saints, and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ. For I have derived much joy and comfort from your love, my brother, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Accordingly, though I am bold enough in Christ to command you to do what is required, yet for love's sake I prefer to appeal to you—I, Paul, an old man and now a prisoner also for Christ Jesus— I appeal to you for my child, Onesimus, whose father I became in my imprisonment. (Formerly he was useless to you, but now he is indeed useful to you and to me.) I am sending him back to you, sending my very heart. I would have been glad to keep him with me, in order that he might serve me on your behalf during my imprisonment for the gospel, but I preferred to do nothing without your consent in order that your goodness might not be by compulsion but of your own accord. For this perhaps is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back forever, no longer as a bondservant but more than a bondservant, as a beloved brother—especially to me, but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. So if you consider me your partner, receive him as you would receive me. If he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, charge that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it—to say nothing of your owing me even your own self. Yes, brother, I want some benefit from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in Christ. Confident of your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say. At the same time, prepare a guest room for me, for I am hoping that through your prayers I will be graciously given to you. Epaphras, my fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus, sends greetings to you, and so do Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke, my fellow workers. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”
Paul, a prisoner for Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I thank my God always when I remember you in my prayers, because I hear of your love and of the faith that you have toward the Lord Jesus and for all the saints, and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ. For I have derived much joy and comfort from your love, my brother, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Accordingly, though I am bold enough in Christ to command you to do what is required, yet for love's sake I prefer to appeal to you—I, Paul, an old man and now a prisoner also for Christ Jesus— I appeal to you for my child, Onesimus, whose father I became in my imprisonment. (Formerly he was useless to you, but now he is indeed useful to you and to me.) I am sending him back to you, sending my very heart. I would have been glad to keep him with me, in order that he might serve me on your behalf during my imprisonment for the gospel, but I preferred to do nothing without your consent in order that your goodness might not be by compulsion but of your own accord. For this perhaps is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back forever, no longer as a bondservant but more than a bondservant, as a beloved brother—especially to me, but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. So if you consider me your partner, receive him as you would receive me. If he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, charge that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it—to say nothing of your owing me even your own self. Yes, brother, I want some benefit from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in Christ. Confident of your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say. At the same time, prepare a guest room for me, for I am hoping that through your prayers I will be graciously given to you. Epaphras, my fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus, sends greetings to you, and so do Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke, my fellow workers. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”
Paul, a prisoner for Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I thank my God always when I remember you in my prayers, because I hear of your love and of the faith that you have toward the Lord Jesus and for all the saints, and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ. For I have derived much joy and comfort from your love, my brother, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Accordingly, though I am bold enough in Christ to command you to do what is required, yet for love's sake I prefer to appeal to you—I, Paul, an old man and now a prisoner also for Christ Jesus— I appeal to you for my child, Onesimus, whose father I became in my imprisonment. (Formerly he was useless to you, but now he is indeed useful to you and to me.) I am sending him back to you, sending my very heart. I would have been glad to keep him with me, in order that he might serve me on your behalf during my imprisonment for the gospel, but I preferred to do nothing without your consent in order that your goodness might not be by compulsion but of your own accord. For this perhaps is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back forever, no longer as a bondservant but more than a bondservant, as a beloved brother—especially to me, but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. So if you consider me your partner, receive him as you would receive me. If he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, charge that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it—to say nothing of your owing me even your own self. Yes, brother, I want some benefit from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in Christ. Confident of your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say. At the same time, prepare a guest room for me, for I am hoping that through your prayers I will be graciously given to you. Epaphras, my fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus, sends greetings to you, and so do Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke, my fellow workers. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”
Paul, a prisoner for Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I thank my God always when I remember you in my prayers, because I hear of your love and of the faith that you have toward the Lord Jesus and for all the saints, and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ. For I have derived much joy and comfort from your love, my brother, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Accordingly, though I am bold enough in Christ to command you to do what is required, yet for love's sake I prefer to appeal to you—I, Paul, an old man and now a prisoner also for Christ Jesus— I appeal to you for my child, Onesimus, whose father I became in my imprisonment. (Formerly he was useless to you, but now he is indeed useful to you and to me.) I am sending him back to you, sending my very heart. I would have been glad to keep him with me, in order that he might serve me on your behalf during my imprisonment for the gospel, but I preferred to do nothing without your consent in order that your goodness might not be by compulsion but of your own accord. For this perhaps is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back forever, no longer as a bondservant but more than a bondservant, as a beloved brother—especially to me, but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. So if you consider me your partner, receive him as you would receive me. If he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, charge that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it—to say nothing of your owing me even your own self. Yes, brother, I want some benefit from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in Christ. Confident of your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say. At the same time, prepare a guest room for me, for I am hoping that through your prayers I will be graciously given to you. Epaphras, my fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus, sends greetings to you, and so do Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke, my fellow workers. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”
Now that you have some back ground, let’s go ahead and jump into the text. Please open your Bibles to Philemon. Again, it’s in the New Testament towards the back of your Bible and sits between Titus and Hebrews…… or you can follow along on the screen. Though we’ll read the entire letter, we’re going to focus on the first 11 verses this week and the remainder the following week. So starting in verse 1…..
The opening verses are a greeting from Paul to Philemon, Philemon’s wife Apphia, Philemon’s son Archippus, and the Colossian church….a church that meets in Philemon’s home. Remember….the first century local church met in the homes of Jesus followers….they did not have a large church building to meet in, fellowship in, or have Bible studies or potlucks…..they met in people’s homes – just like our Life Groups meet in the homes of some members of this church. We see through the words “fellow worker and fellow soldier” that Philemon and his son were the leaders of the Colossian church and shared the Gospel with those far from Jesus. The mention of Timothy in the greeting indicates Timothy was with Paul in Rome and that Timothy likely wrote the letter for Paul as Paul dictated his thoughts.
Paul, a prisoner for Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I thank my God always when I remember you in my prayers, because I hear of your love and of the faith that you have toward the Lord Jesus and for all the saints, and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ. For I have derived much joy and comfort from your love, my brother, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Accordingly, though I am bold enough in Christ to command you to do what is required, yet for love's sake I prefer to appeal to you—I, Paul, an old man and now a prisoner also for Christ Jesus— I appeal to you for my child, Onesimus, whose father I became in my imprisonment. (Formerly he was useless to you, but now he is indeed useful to you and to me.) I am sending him back to you, sending my very heart. I would have been glad to keep him with me, in order that he might serve me on your behalf during my imprisonment for the gospel, but I preferred to do nothing without your consent in order that your goodness might not be by compulsion but of your own accord. For this perhaps is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back forever, no longer as a bondservant but more than a bondservant, as a beloved brother—especially to me, but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. So if you consider me your partner, receive him as you would receive me. If he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, charge that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it—to say nothing of your owing me even your own self. Yes, brother, I want some benefit from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in Christ. Confident of your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say. At the same time, prepare a guest room for me, for I am hoping that through your prayers I will be graciously given to you. Epaphras, my fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus, sends greetings to you, and so do Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke, my fellow workers. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”
The opening verses are a greeting from Paul to Philemon, Philemon’s wife Apphia, Philemon’s son Archippus, and the Colossian church….a church that meets in Philemon’s home. Remember….the first century local church met in the homes of Jesus followers….they did not have a large church building to meet in, fellowship in, or have Bible studies or potlucks…..they met in people’s homes – just like our Life Groups meet in the homes of some members of this church. We see through the words “fellow worker and fellow soldier” that Philemon and his son were the leaders of the Colossian church and shared the Gospel with those far from Jesus. The mention of Timothy in the greeting indicates Timothy was with Paul in Rome and that Timothy likely wrote the letter for Paul as Paul dictated his thoughts.
Paul, a prisoner for Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I thank my God always when I remember you in my prayers, because I hear of your love and of the faith that you have toward the Lord Jesus and for all the saints, and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ. For I have derived much joy and comfort from your love, my brother, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Accordingly, though I am bold enough in Christ to command you to do what is required, yet for love's sake I prefer to appeal to you—I, Paul, an old man and now a prisoner also for Christ Jesus— I appeal to you for my child, Onesimus, whose father I became in my imprisonment. (Formerly he was useless to you, but now he is indeed useful to you and to me.) I am sending him back to you, sending my very heart. I would have been glad to keep him with me, in order that he might serve me on your behalf during my imprisonment for the gospel, but I preferred to do nothing without your consent in order that your goodness might not be by compulsion but of your own accord. For this perhaps is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back forever, no longer as a bondservant but more than a bondservant, as a beloved brother—especially to me, but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. So if you consider me your partner, receive him as you would receive me. If he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, charge that to my account. I, Paul, write this with my own hand: I will repay it—to say nothing of your owing me even your own self. Yes, brother, I want some benefit from you in the Lord. Refresh my heart in Christ. Confident of your obedience, I write to you, knowing that you will do even more than I say. At the same time, prepare a guest room for me, for I am hoping that through your prayers I will be graciously given to you. Epaphras, my fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus, sends greetings to you, and so do Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke, my fellow workers. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”
The opening verses are a greeting from Paul to Philemon, Philemon’s wife Apphia, Philemon’s son Archippus, and the Colossian church….a church that meets in Philemon’s home. Remember….the first century local church met in the homes of Jesus followers….they did not have a large church building to meet in, fellowship in, or have Bible studies or potlucks…..they met in people’s homes – just like our Life Groups meet in the homes of some members of this church. We see through the words “fellow worker and fellow soldier” that Philemon and his son were the leaders of the Colossian church and shared the Gospel with those far from Jesus. The mention of Timothy in the greeting indicates Timothy was with Paul in Rome and that Timothy likely wrote the letter for Paul as Paul dictated his thoughts.
The opening verses are a greeting from Paul to Philemon, Philemon’s wife Apphia, Philemon’s son Archippus, and the Colossian church….a church that meets in Philemon’s home. Remember….the first century local church met in the homes of Jesus followers….they did not have a large church building to meet in, fellowship in, or have Bible studies or potlucks…..they met in people’s homes – just like our Life Groups meet in the homes of some members of this church. We see through the words “fellow worker and fellow soldier” that Philemon and his son were the leaders of the Colossian church and shared the Gospel with those far from Jesus. The mention of Timothy in the greeting indicates Timothy was with Paul in Rome and that Timothy likely wrote the letter for Paul as Paul dictated his thoughts.
The opening verses are a greeting from Paul to Philemon, Philemon’s wife Apphia, Philemon’s son Archippus, and the Colossian church….a church that meets in Philemon’s home. Remember….the first century local church met in the homes of Jesus followers….they did not have a large church building to meet in, fellowship in, or have Bible studies or potlucks…..they met in people’s homes – just like our Life Groups meet in the homes of some members of this church. We see through the words “fellow worker and fellow soldier” that Philemon and his son were the leaders of the Colossian church and shared the Gospel with those far from Jesus.
In verses 4 through 7, Paul was thankful to God for Philemon because Philemon was active in living out his faith in Christ Jesus. His faith was not by mere words but exhibited by love in action for those around him. Through love, Philemon was sharing his faith with people that did not know our Savior. Philemon is so faithful and full of Christ’s love that news of Philemon’s actions have made it from present day western Turkey all the way to Rome…..a distance of 1200 miles. To put the distance in a first century perspective, if you walked 10 hours a day at a pace of 3 miles per hour, it would roughly take you 48 days to walk 1200 miles. That’s some distance….in a first century context sort of way.
In verses 4 through 7, Paul was thankful to God for Philemon because Philemon was active in living out his faith in Christ Jesus. His faith was not by mere words but exhibited by love in action for those around him. Through love, Philemon was sharing his faith with people that did not know our Savior. Philemon is so faithful and full of Christ’s love that news of Philemon’s actions have made it from present day western Turkey all the way to Rome…..a distance of 1200 miles.
In verses 4 through 7, Paul was thankful to God for Philemon because Philemon was active in living out his faith in Christ Jesus. His faith was not by mere words but exhibited by love in action for those around him. Through love, Philemon was sharing his faith with people that did not know our Savior. Philemon is so faithful and full of Christ’s love that news of Philemon’s actions have made it from present day western Turkey all the way to Rome…..a distance of 1200 miles. To put the distance in a first century perspective, if you walked 10 hours a day at a pace of 3 miles per hour, it would roughly take you 48 days to walk 1200 miles. That’s some distance….in a first century context sort of way.
The opening verses are a greeting from Paul to Philemon, Philemon’s wife Apphia, Philemon’s son Archippus, and the Colossian church….a church that meets in Philemon’s home. Remember….the first century local church met in the homes of Jesus followers….they did not have a large church building to meet in, fellowship in, or have Bible studies or potlucks…..they met in people’s homes – just like our Life Groups meet in the homes of some members of this church. We see through the words “fellow worker and fellow soldier” that Philemon and his son were the leaders of the Colossian church and shared the Gospel with those far from Jesus. The mention of Timothy in the greeting indicates Timothy was with Paul in Rome and that Timothy likely wrote the letter for Paul as Paul dictated his thoughts.
In verses 4 through 7, Paul was thankful to God for Philemon because Philemon was active in living out his faith in Christ Jesus. His faith was not by mere words but exhibited by love in action for those around him. Through love, Philemon was sharing his faith with people that did not know our Savior. Philemon is so faithful and full of Christ’s love that news of Philemon’s actions have made it from present day western Turkey all the way to Rome…..a distance of 1200 miles. To put the distance in a first century perspective, if you walked 10 hours a day at a pace of 3 miles per hour, it would roughly take you 48 days to walk 1200 miles. That’s some distance….in a first century context sort of way.
In verses 4 through 7, Paul was thankful to God for Philemon because Philemon was active in living out his faith in Christ Jesus. His faith was not by mere words but exhibited by love in action for those around him. Through love, Philemon was sharing his faith with people that did not know our Savior. Philemon was so faithful and full of Christ’s love that news of Philemon’s actions have made it from present day western Turkey all the way to Rome…..a distance of 1200 miles. To put the distance in a first century perspective, if you walked 10 hours a day at a pace of 3 miles per hour, it would roughly take you 48 days to walk 1200 miles. That’s some distance….in a first century context sort of way.
Jesus’ half-brother James…the same James that did not believe Jesus is the Son of God…the Messiah…when they were growing up……but ended up believing his own brother is in fact God because he saw his brother die the most horrible death ….death on a Roman cross….and saw his bother defeat death and was resurrected from the dead - walking around and talking before ascending to heaven to sit at God the Father’s right hand….that James had so much faith that his brother is God that he ended up writing the Book of James…..and here is what we learn from James in chapter 2 verses 14 to 17 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” Philemon had the faith and the love to live it out boldly for Jesus and God’s kingdom…his faith was not dead and Paul knew it. The text from verse 7 shows that Paul and the Colossian church were blessed through the knowledge of Philemon’s obedience to the Savior and Philemon’s love in action.
Jesus’ half-brother James…the same James that did not believe Jesus is the Son of God…the Messiah…when they were growing up……but ended up believing his own brother is in fact God because he saw his brother die the most horrible death ….death on a Roman cross….and saw his bother defeat death and was resurrected from the dead - walking around and talking before ascending to heaven to sit at God the Father’s right hand….that James had so much faith that his brother is God that he ended up writing the Book of James…..and here is what we learn from James in chapter 2 verses 14 to 17 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” Philemon had the faith and the love to live it out boldly for Jesus and God’s kingdom…his faith was not dead and Paul knew it. The text from verse 7 shows that Paul and the Colossian church were blessed through the knowledge of Philemon’s obedience to the Savior and Philemon’s love in action.
Jesus’ half-brother James…the same James that did not believe Jesus is the Son of God…the Messiah…when they were growing up……but ended up believing his own brother is in fact God because he saw his brother die the most horrible death ….death on a Roman cross….and saw his bother defeat death and was resurrected from the dead - walking around and talking before ascending to heaven to sit at God the Father’s right hand….that James had so much faith that his brother is God that he ended up writing the Book of James…..and here is what we learn from James in chapter 2 verses 14 to 17 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” Philemon had the faith and the love to live it out boldly for Jesus and God’s kingdom…his faith was not dead and Paul knew it. The text from verse 7 shows that Paul and the Colossian church were blessed through the knowledge of Philemon’s obedience to the Savior and Philemon’s love in action.
In verses 4 through 7, Paul was thankful to God for Philemon because Philemon was active in living out his faith in Christ Jesus. His faith was not by mere words but exhibited by love in action for those around him. Through love, Philemon was sharing his faith with people that did not know our Savior. Philemon was so faithful and full of Christ’s love that news of Philemon’s actions have made it from present day western Turkey all the way to Rome…..a distance of 1200 miles. To put the distance in a first century perspective, if you walked 10 hours a day at a pace of 3 miles per hour, it would roughly take you 48 days to walk 1200 miles. That’s some distance….in a first century context sort of way.
Jesus’ half-brother James…the same James that did not believe Jesus is the Son of God…the Messiah…when they were growing up……but ended up believing his own brother is in fact God because he saw his brother die the most horrible death ….death on a Roman cross….and saw his bother defeat death and was resurrected from the dead - walking around and talking before ascending to heaven to sit at God the Father’s right hand….that James had so much faith that his brother is God that he ended up writing the Book of James…..and here is what we learn from James in chapter 2 verses 14 to 17 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” Philemon had the faith and the love to live it out boldly for Jesus and God’s kingdom…his faith was not dead and Paul knew it. The text from verse 7 shows that Paul and the Colossian church were blessed through the knowledge of Philemon’s obedience to the Savior and Philemon’s love in action.
Jesus’ half-brother James…the same James that did not believe Jesus is the Son of God…the Messiah…when they were growing up……but ended up believing his own brother is in fact God because he saw his brother die the most horrible death ….death on a Roman cross….and saw his bother defeat death and was resurrected from the dead - walking around and talking before ascending to heaven to sit at God the Father’s right hand….that James had so much faith that his brother is God that he ended up writing the Book of James…..and here is what we learn from James in chapter 2 verses 14 to 17 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” Philemon had the faith and the love to live it out boldly for Jesus and God’s kingdom…his faith was not dead and Paul knew it. The text from verse 7 shows that Paul and the Colossian church were blessed through the knowledge of Philemon’s obedience to the Savior and Philemon’s love in action.
It appears in verse 6 that Paul is beginning to set the stage and making his initial appeal to Philemon’s full obedience to God and listening to God the Holy Spirit. The first part of verse 6 states, “and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective..” The Greek term for “sharing of your faith” is also translated as “fellowship.” Philemon, as are all Christians, was to be in full fellowship with other believers. Authentic faith and love in fellowship requires the full measure of forgiveness. As you recall, Onesimus was a slave to Philemon and Onesimus ran away. Runaway slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and were caught under Roman jurisdiction would undergo some harsh penalties for their actions. They were beaten, battered, tortured…killed…. put to death in all the ways the Romans were famous for. Since Philemon was a Roman citizen – in Roman lands – he could have put Onesimus to death. It was within his Roman rights. But Onesimus is a Christian…which means he is in the fellowship…..he is a brother in Christ to Paul and Philemon…..he belonged to Jesus. Christians are not to let things get in the way of our full fellowship with one another. If we sin against one another.…we are to seek forgiveness and we are to forgive those that sin against us……God forgives all those that confess Jesus as Lord and believe that God raised Him from the dead. Since Jesus died for our sins and forgave us…we too are to forgive. Philemon must forgive Onesimus.
It appears in verse 6 that Paul is beginning to set the stage and making his initial appeal to Philemon’s full obedience to God and listening to God the Holy Spirit. The first part of verse 6 states, “and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective..” The Greek term for “sharing of your faith” is also translated as “fellowship.” Philemon, as are all Christians, was to be in full fellowship with other believers. Authentic faith and love in fellowship requires the full measure of forgiveness. As you recall, Onesimus was a slave to Philemon and Onesimus ran away. Runaway slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and were caught under Roman jurisdiction would undergo some harsh penalties for their actions. They were beaten, battered, tortured…killed…. put to death in all the ways the Romans were famous for. Since Philemon was a Roman citizen – in Roman lands – he could have put Onesimus to death. It was within his Roman rights. But Onesimus is a Christian…which means he is in the fellowship…..he is a brother in Christ to Paul and Philemon…..he belonged to Jesus. Christians are not to let things get in the way of our full fellowship with one another. If we sin against one another.…we are to seek forgiveness and we are to forgive those that sin against us……God forgives all those that confess Jesus as Lord and believe that God raised Him from the dead. Since Jesus died for our sins and forgave us…we too are to forgive. Philemon must forgive Onesimus.
Jesus’ half-brother James…the same James that did not believe Jesus is the Son of God…the Messiah…when they were growing up……but ended up believing his own brother is in fact God because he saw his brother die the most horrible death ….death on a Roman cross….and saw his bother defeat death and was resurrected from the dead - walking around and talking before ascending to heaven to sit at God the Father’s right hand….that James had so much faith that his brother is God that he ended up writing the Book of James…..and here is what we learn from James in chapter 2 verses 14 to 17 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” Philemon had the faith and the love to live it out boldly for Jesus and God’s kingdom…his faith was not dead and Paul knew it. The text from verse 7 shows that Paul and the Colossian church were blessed through the knowledge of Philemon’s obedience to the Savior and Philemon’s love in action.
Verse 8 officially begins Paul’s plea of Onesimus. Paul, being an apostle of Jesus, having full authority, could have ordered Philemon to let Onesimus live, not to punish Onesimus, to free Onesimus – to forgive Onesimus. An authentic Christian would obey Paul’s commands – because those commands were in line with God’s will. To disobey would negatively impact and damage fellowship among the believers. Paul states his apostolic authority in verse 8.
It appears in verse 6 that Paul is beginning to set the stage and making his initial appeal to Philemon’s full obedience to God and listening to God the Holy Spirit. The first part of verse 6 states, “and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective..” The Greek term for “sharing of your faith” is also translated as “fellowship.” Philemon, as are all Christians, was to be in full fellowship with other believers. Authentic faith and love in fellowship requires the full measure of forgiveness. As you recall, Onesimus was a slave to Philemon and Onesimus ran away. Runaway slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and were caught under Roman jurisdiction would undergo some harsh penalties for their actions. They were beaten, battered, tortured…killed…. put to death in all the ways the Romans were famous for. Since Philemon was a Roman citizen – in Roman lands – he could have put Onesimus to death. It was within his Roman rights. But Onesimus is a Christian…which means he is in the fellowship…..he is a brother in Christ to Paul and Philemon…..he belonged to Jesus. Christians are not to let things get in the way of our full fellowship with one another. If we sin against one another.…we are to seek forgiveness and we are to forgive those that sin against us……God forgives all those that confess Jesus as Lord and believe that God raised Him from the dead. Since Jesus died for our sins and forgave us…we too are to forgive. Philemon must forgive Onesimus.
It appears in verse 6 that Paul is beginning to set the stage and making his initial appeal to Philemon’s full obedience to God and listening to God the Holy Spirit. The first part of verse 6 states, “and I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective..” The Greek term for “sharing of your faith” is also translated as “fellowship.” Philemon, as are all Christians, was to be in full fellowship with other believers. Authentic faith and love in fellowship requires the full measure of forgiveness. As you recall, Onesimus was a slave to Philemon and Onesimus ran away. Runaway slaves, bondservants, indentured servants that ran away and were caught under Roman jurisdiction would undergo some harsh penalties for their actions. They were beaten, battered, tortured…killed…. put to death in all the ways the Romans were famous for. Since Philemon was a Roman citizen – in Roman lands – he could have put Onesimus to death. It was within his Roman rights. But Onesimus is a Christian…which means he is in the fellowship…..he is a brother in Christ to Paul and Philemon…..he belonged to Jesus. Christians are not to let things get in the way of our full fellowship with one another. If we sin against one another.…we are to seek forgiveness and we are to forgive those that sin against us……God forgives all those that confess Jesus as Lord and believe that God raised Him from the dead. Since Jesus died for our sins and forgave us…we too are to forgive. Philemon must forgive Onesimus.
Verse 8 officially begins Paul’s plea of Onesimus. Paul, being an apostle of Jesus, having full authority, could have ordered Philemon to let Onesimus live, not to punish Onesimus, to free Onesimus – to forgive Onesimus. An authentic Christian would obey Paul’s commands – because those commands were in line with God’s will. To disobey would negatively impact and damage fellowship among the believers. Paul states his apostolic authority in verse 8.
Verse 8 officially begins Paul’s plea for Onesimus. Paul, being an apostle of Jesus, having full authority, could have ordered Philemon to let Onesimus live, not to punish Onesimus, to free Onesimus – to forgive Onesimus. An authentic Christian would obey Paul’s commands – because those commands were in line with God’s will. To disobey would negatively impact and damage fellowship among the believers. Paul states his apostolic authority in verse 8.
Verse 8 officially begins Paul’s plea of Onesimus. Paul, being an apostle of Jesus, having full authority, could have ordered Philemon to let Onesimus live, not to punish Onesimus, to free Onesimus – to forgive Onesimus. An authentic Christian would obey Paul’s commands – because those commands were in line with God’s will. To disobey would negatively impact and damage fellowship among the believers. Paul states his apostolic authority in verse 8.
Yet in verse 9 and 10, Paul appeals to Philemon’s free will because of love. God loves us yet gives us the freedom to choose what we want to do. Paul loved Philemon and gave him the choice to do what is in line with God’s will. You likely do the same thing in your household. I do the same thing with JP. I instruct his heart and head on what is right and wrong, and he gets to choose his course of action – and reap the benefits for right choices or suffer the consequences for the incorrect choices. Sometimes you or I have to force the correct course of action with our children either because its needed for safety concerns or they are simply unable to make the right choice. Paul could have forced the issue with Philemon and made the decision for him. Instead Paul choose to take the same course of action God uses….an informed free will decision to do what is right.
Yet in verse 9 and 10, Paul appeals to Philemon’s free will because of love. God loves us yet gives us the freedom to choose what we want to do. Paul loved Philemon and gave him the choice to do what is in line with God’s will. You likely do the same thing in your household. I do the same thing with JP. I instruct his heart and head on what is right and wrong, and he gets to choose his course of action – and reap the benefits for right choices or suffer the consequences for the incorrect choices. Sometimes you or I have to force the correct course of action with our children either because its needed for safety concerns or they are simply unable to make the right choice. Paul could have forced the issue with Philemon and made the decision for him. Instead Paul choose to take the same course of action God uses….an informed free will decision to do what is right.
Paul informs Philemon that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – Paul knows this because he led Onesimus to faith and discipled him in Rome. Paul uses the words “my child” and “whose father I became” to illustrate this for Philemon. Paul uses a play on words using the meaning of Onesimus’ name by stating in verse 11 that Onesimus is now “useful” because he’s back with Philemon and because he is a brother in Christ and in the fellowship. Onesimus will work for Philemon as he would for Jesus and he will work for the church and those in it.
Paul informs Philemon that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – Paul knows this because he led Onesimus to faith and discipled him in Rome. Paul uses the words “my child” and “whose father I became” to illustrate this for Philemon. Paul uses a play on words using the meaning of Onesimus’ name by stating in verse 11 that Onesimus is now “useful” because he’s back with Philemon and because he is a brother in Christ in the fellowship. Onesimus will work for Philemon as he would for Jesus and he will work for the church and those in it.
Yet in verse 9 and 10, Paul appeals to Philemon’s free will because of love. God loves us yet gives us the freedom to choose what we want to do. Paul loved Philemon and gave him the choice to do what is in line with God’s will. You likely do the same thing in your household. I do the same thing with my son. I instruct his heart and head on what is right and wrong, and he gets to choose his course of action – and reap the benefits for right choices or suffer the consequences for the incorrect choices. Sometimes you or I have to force the correct course of action with our children either because its needed for safety concerns or they are simply unable to make the right choice. Paul could have forced the issue with Philemon and made the decision for him. Instead Paul choose to take the same course of action God uses….an informed free will decision to do what is right.
Yet in verse 9 and 10, Paul appeals to Philemon’s free will because of love. God loves us yet gives us the freedom to choose what we want to do. Paul loved Philemon and gave him the choice to do what is in line with God’s will. You likely do the same thing in your household. I do the same thing with JP. I instruct his heart and head on what is right and wrong, and he gets to choose his course of action – and reap the benefits for right choices or suffer the consequences for the incorrect choices. Sometimes you or I have to force the correct course of action with our children either because its needed for safety concerns or they are simply unable to make the right choice. Paul could have forced the issue with Philemon and made the decision for him. Instead Paul choose to take the same course of action God uses….an informed free will decision to do what is right.
Onesimus did wrong by Philemon when he ran away. Yet Paul appeals to Philemon, letting him know that he must demonstrate the same love Jesus demonstrated when He died on the Cross for our sins so we could be forgiven of those sins. Philemon had to forgive Onesimus out of authentic faith, in love, for the fellowship.
Paul informs Philemon that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – Paul knows this because he led Onesimus to faith and discipled him in Rome. Paul uses the words “my child” and “whose father I became” to illustrate this for Philemon. Paul uses a play on words using the meaning of Onesimus’ name by stating in verse 11 that Onesimus is now “useful” because he’s back with Philemon and because he is a brother in Christ and in the fellowship. Onesimus will work for Philemon as he would for Jesus and he will work for the church and those in it.
Paul informs Philemon that Onesimus is a brother in Christ – Paul knows this because he led Onesimus to faith and discipled him in Rome. Paul uses the words “my child” and “whose father I became” to illustrate this for Philemon. Paul uses a play on words using the meaning of Onesimus’ name by stating in verse 11 that Onesimus is now “useful” because he’s back with Philemon and because he is a brother in Christ and in the fellowship. Onesimus will work for Philemon as he would for Jesus and he will work for the church and those in it.
Onesimus did wrong by Philemon when he ran away. Yet Paul appeals to Philemon, letting him know that he must demonstrate the same love Jesus demonstrated when He died on the Cross for our sins so we could be forgiven of those sins. Philemon had to forgive Onesimus out of authentic faith, in love, for the fellowship.
Onesimus did wrong by Philemon when he ran away. Yet Paul appeals to Philemon, letting him know that he must demonstrate the same love Jesus demonstrated when He died on the Cross for our sins so we could be forgiven of those sins. Philemon had to forgive Onesimus out of authentic faith, in love, for the fellowship.
I mentioned to you before about the marital issues Caroline and I had before we became Christians. Our marriage was as close to over as it could have been. Because of our marital issues….I looked to God and confessed Jesus as Lord and believed in my heart that God raised Him from the dead – I asked Jesus to forgive me for all my sins and repented. He forgave me. I had wronged Caroline in so many ways. I asked for her forgiveness and she forgave me. She asked for my forgiveness and I forgave her. Jesus kept us together.
Do you have someone to forgive? Has someone wronged you and sought your forgiveness? Did you withhold that forgiveness? If this is the case, I urge you to forgive just as Jesus forgave you. He died on the Cross for you so He could forgive you for your sins…the wrongs you’ve done against Him. Jesus did it all for you because He loves you. He took your punishment – the punishment you deserve for your sins – He took your sins upon Himself at the Cross. He forgave you and so you must forgive others also. If you are a Christian and your love is authentic….you must forgive for the sake of the fellowship of believers and love for our Lord and Savior.
I mentioned to you before about the marital issues Caroline and I had before we became Christians. Our marriage was as close to over as it could have been. Because of our marital issues….I looked to God and confessed Jesus as Lord and believed in my heart that God raised Him from the dead – I asked Jesus to forgive me for all my sins and repented. He forgave me. I had wronged Caroline in so many ways. I asked for her forgiveness and she forgave me. She asked for my forgiveness and I forgave her. Jesus kept us together.
I mentioned to you before about the marital issues Caroline and I had before we became Christians. Our marriage was as close to over as it could have been. Because of our marital issues….I looked to God and confessed Jesus as Lord and believed in my heart that God raised Him from the dead – I asked Jesus to forgive me for all my sins and repented. He forgave me. I had wronged Caroline in so many ways. I asked for her forgiveness and she forgave me. She asked for my forgiveness and I forgave her. Jesus kept us together.
to love is to forgive……Amen!
Do you have someone to forgive? Has someone wronged you and sought your forgiveness? Did you withhold that forgiveness? If this is the case, I urge you to forgive just as Jesus forgave you. He died on the Cross for you so He could forgive you for your sins…the wrongs you’ve done against Him. Jesus did it all for you because He loves you. He took your punishment – the punishment you deserve for your sins – He took your sins upon Himself at the Cross. He forgave you and so you must forgive others also. If you are a Christian and your love is authentic….you must forgive for the sake of the fellowship of believers and love for our Lord and Savior.
Do you have someone to forgive? Has someone wronged you and sought your forgiveness? Did you withhold that forgiveness? If this is the case, I urge you to forgive just as Jesus forgave you. He died on the Cross for you so He could forgive you for your sins…the wrongs you’ve done against Him. Jesus did it all for you because He loves you. He took your punishment – the punishment you deserve for your sins – He took your sins upon Himself at the Cross. He forgave you and so you must forgive others also. If you are a Christian and your love is authentic….you must forgive for the sake of the fellowship of believers and love for our Lord and Savior.
Now go back and look at the name you wrote down earlier. That someone that has wronged you, that person you have not forgiven needs a clean break from your unforgiveness – you need a clean break from an unforgiving heart – because to love is to forgive……Amen!
Now go back and look at the name you wrote down earlier. That someone that has wronged you, that person you have not forgiven needs a clean break from your unforgiveness – you need a clean break from an unforgiving heart – because to love is to forgive……Amen!
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