Faithlife Sermons

Untitled Sermon (8)

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 1 view
Notes
Transcript
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →
I’m going to begin this sermon the same way I began last week’s sermon.
Le test du bon samaritain
Last week I said that I grew up hearing certain things about the gospel, and about salvation. I grew up hearing that on the cross Jesus made it possible for us to be saved, but that it was up to us to make the right decision and accept that gift of salvation, and that everyone is able to do this. So when I read my Bible, I would occasionally come across texts like the one we saw last week, and have no idea what to do with them.
Last week we heard Jesus say (in v. 22),
I grew up hearing that on the cross Jesus made it possible for us to be saved; but that it was up to us to make the right decision and accept that gift of salvation. So when I would read my Bible, I would occasionally come across
…no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.
So it’s impossible to know God unless the Son reveals the Father to us. That, we can handle. But just before, in v. 20, he tells the disciples to rejoice that
your names are written in heaven.
And in , we are told that if our names are written in heaven, they were written there before for the foundation of the world.
These truths are all over the Bible.
The Bible tells us:
that human beings are all totally unable to come to God, because we are dead in our sin ();
that before the foundation of the world, God sovereignly chose those he would save (, );
it tells us that those whom God chose to save, he absolutely will save, because the work of Christ purchased their salvation (, );
it tells us that those whom the Father draws to himself will irresistibly come to him ();
and that those who are saved will stay saved, because God will cause them to persevere until the very end ().
When I finally discovered these truths around the age of 25, all these texts that confused me before made sense for the first time. I welcomed these truths, and I love them still, and I was a joyful Christian for the first time in my life.
But then I kept reading, and I got confused again.
Because as I read there seemed to be other texts—the texts I had heard all my life—that seemed to go in the other direction.
Today’s text is one of those texts.
It’s one even non-Christians know well—in today’s text Jesus is going to tell the parable of the Good Samaritan.
Since the parable is well-known, we’re going to do things a little different today. We’re going to read the text from beginning to end, and then we’re going to look at it in three different ways. We’re going to talk about how people usually understand this text; then we’re going to ask ourselves why Luke, the author of this gospel, made the choices that he made when writing this text; and finally, we’re going to talk about what it actually means.

The Text (10.25-37)

s
25 And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” 26 He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” 27 And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” 28 And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.”
29 But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” 30 Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead. 31 Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. 32 So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. 34 He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him. 35 And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’ 36 Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” 37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.”

How People Usually Understand It

No big surprises there; it’s so simple a child can grasp it. People think they know the story. A man asks Jesus how to be saved; Jesus reminds him of the two major components of the Law; and he illustrates it by talking about a man who is beaten and robbed, then two of his fellow countrymen—pious men at that—who pass by without helping him, and a Samaritan—the mortal enemies of the Jews—who helps him and cares for him.
And Jesus says, “You go, and do likewise.”
So here’s what people usually understand, in a nutshell: loving other people is more important than believing in any particular faith or obeying any particular religious code. Love other people, and you will prove the good in your heart, and God will accept you for that—because that is what the Good Samaritan did.
And on first reading, that does seem to be the drift of what Jesus is saying. He does say, “Love the Lord your God,” sure, but in the story—the example he gives—he doesn’t talk about God at all. And his conclusion to the whole thing, after the lawyer recognizes that the good neighbor in the story is the one who showed mercy, is to say, “Do the same—show mercy to others. Love your neighbor.”
Unbelievers love this text, because it gives them a reason to say that Jesus was a wonderful moral teacher, and the problem with Christianity lies in what Jesus’s believers have made of him. They say that to be a true follower of Christ, then we need to do what he did: love other people. Take care of those who can’t take care of themselves.
As important as it is to do as Jesus did—to love others, to take care of those who can’t take care of themselves—that’s not what this parable is saying. This is not a way for us to “earn” our salvation through altruism. If you want that to be the message of this parable, you have to take this text entirely out of the context of everything that comes before it and everything that comes after it.
So what’s the alternative?

Luke the Theologian

Let’s take a step way back to talk about the way the Bible was actually written. In , Paul tells Timothy:
16 All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, 17 that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.
When Paul says that all Scripture was “breathed out by God,” what he means is that the Holy Spirit divinely inspired human authors to write exactly what he meant them to write, while allowing them to use their own methods and personalities to get his message across. It’s the ultimate partnership. Human authors, with their own brains, under the inspiration of the Spirit, writing exactly what God wanted them to write, in exactly the way he wanted them to write it.
So when we read Scripture, it’s important that we not only ask, “What is God trying to tell us in this text?”, but we must also ask, “What is Luke trying to tell us in this text?” William Taylor helpfully reminds us that as he was writing the gospel, Luke was not simply an author recording what happened; he was a theologian. Luke is our guide for interpreting his gospel. He was writing what happened, but he was also writing it in a specific way, so that we would understand something specific about God and about the gospel.
And anyone who reads knows that that’s how books work: the order of events in a book is often just as important as the events themselves. If the author recounts a story from a character’s past in the beginning of a book, it may not make a lot of sense or seem that important. If he recounts the exact same story at the end of a book, it can take on a whole new meaning because of everything that has come before.
So here’s the question we need to ask ourselves, before we can dive into what Luke is trying to tell us: Why did Luke choose to record this event here, just after the passage we saw last week?
The passage we saw last week puts a lot of emphasis on God’s sovereignty over salvation, as we saw before.
He always wrote what happened, but he often chose to bring up certain event at certain times.
...you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will.
...you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will.
Jesus rejoices that it was God’s gracious will to hide these things from some and reveal them to others.
...no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.
If we come to the Father, it is only because the Son chose to reveal the Father to us.
you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will.
And then we come to v. 25, and Luke doesn’t change subjects—in last week’s text, Jesus talks about how salvation works, and in this text he does the same thing: the question the lawyer asks Jesus concerns how salvation works, how to inherit eternal life. Given what came last week, we would expect Jesus to say, “If you want to inherit eternal life, I have to reveal the Father to you.”
But that’s not what he says. He asks the lawyer (v. 26), “What is written in the Law?” and in v. 27, the lawyer gives a summary of the Law (v. 27):
“You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.”
And Jesus says, “Yes, that’s right. That’s how you inherit eternal life.”
Did Luke forget what he wrote just before? Did he simply overlook this glaring contradiction?
Of course not—God does not contradict himself.
When you come across two texts that seem to be at odds with each other, you don’t accept one and reject the other. You rather interpret one text in light of the other, and both texts in light of the whole Bible.
Luke put this parable about the choices we make and the love we show others here, just after last week’s text about the sovereignty of God over salvation, to force us to do that work: to see how God’s choice, on the one hand, and our choice on the other, fit together.
So let’s do it.

The Fruit of Sovereign Grace

So the lawyer comes to Jesus and asks him (v. 25):
“Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?”
Great question. I wish more people would ask it.
Jesus, as he so often does, answers the question with another question (v. 26):
He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” 27 And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.”
This is a quote from the text we read this morning during worship—it comes from , which (as Loanne rightly said) contains a kind of confession of faith for the people of Israel. All the Law can be summed up in those two statements—love God, love others.
And Jesus says that’s absolutely right.
28 And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.”
The question is, what does it mean to love God, and what does it mean to love our neighbor? Or rather, that should be the question. But that’s not the question the lawyer asks. Luke says in v. 29:
29 But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”
In other words, this man knew perfectly well that there were people whom he would have a very hard time—if not an impossible time—loving. He knew perfectly well that he obeyed this Law toward certain people, but not others. So he’s hoping Jesus will confirm that this is okay: there are certain people who fall under the category of “my neighbors,” and other people who don’t.
But Jesus sorely disappoints him by recounting his parable.
A man is traveling from Jerusalem to Jericho—so presumably he is a Jew, like the lawyer—and is attacked, beaten and robbed. He’s left for dead. And in the following minutes, along comes a priest. Priests were descendants of Aaron, and had responsibilities in the temple of Jerusalem. So he was a Jew too. And he passes by on the other side. After that comes a Levite—Levites were from the tribe of Levi, and served as assistants to the priests. So he was also a Jew. And he passes by too.
Two Jews, members of the religious elite, leaving one of their fellow countrymen to die.
And in v. 33 Jesus pronounces three words that were sure to get the lawyer’s hackles up:
But a Samaritan...
Samaritans and Jews hated each other. They had the same ancestral roots, but they had separated from each other centuries before and the animosity had been building ever since. With those three words, the lawyer would have thought, No way he’s making the Samaritan the GOOD guy in this story! Because a Samaritan was precisely the sort of person this distinguished Israelite would have been trying to justify himself for, the sort of person he could never bring himself to love.
And yet, it is the Samaritan in Jesus’s story who comes alongside this Jew, who binds his wounds and cares for him and pays his bills and nurses him back to health.
And in v. 36, when Jesus concludes his story, he spins it around on the lawyer. He asks,
36 Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” 37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.”
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.
Do you see what he did? The lawyer, seeking to justify himself, had asked, Who is my neighbor? In other words, Whom should I feel obliged to love?
But Jesus turns it around on him: in his story, it wasn’t the one who received love who is the “neighbor,” but the one who gave it.
In other words, when the lawyer asks “Who is my neighbor?” Jesus responds, “You are the neighbor. Who they are is inconsequential.”
The implications of this are shocking. In Jesus’s scenario, it is possible for a Samaritan—someone the Jews saw as unfaithful, idolatrous—to love God better than a priest or a Levite. The proof is that he loved this man whom he had every social reason to hate.
How does love for others save? It doesn’t—it gives the evidence of your love for God. And loving God is impossible unless Jesus reveals him to you.
And that’s exactly
The question: Who is my neighbor?
The answer: YOU are called to be a neighbor. Who they are is inconsequential.
The Question: “What shall I do to inherit eternal life?”
Luc 10.25-37
The answer: “Do what the Law says: Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength, and love your neighbor as yourself.”
Searching for a loophole: “But who is my neighbor?” (That is, “I’m only interested in eternal life. Actually loving God and loving my neighbor doesn’t figure in that.”)
Je vais commencer ce message de la même manière que j’ai commencé celui de la semaine dernière.
Dimanche dernier j’ai dit que j’ai grandi en entendant certaines choses à propos de l’évangile et du salut.
The loophole shot down: The parable.
Do you see that? If the Law can be summed up in those two statements—love God and love others—those two things go together. You can’t love God without loving your neighbor. You may be able to love your neighbor without loving God—out of simple altruism—but you can’t love God without loving others.
Loving God means knowing him for who he is, and being appropriately thankful for who he is, giving him the honor and respect and love which is due him. And if we know him for who he is, we will know the grace that he has shown us, and we will recognize his grace toward us as an absolute good.
The parable:
J’ai entendu que sur la croix Jésus a fait que ce soit possible que nous soyons sauvés,
And here’s the thing: human beings always aspire to what they see as good. Whatever we think is good is what we will want to be and do. If I see having children as good, I will want to have children. If I see helping the poor as good, I will want to help the poor. People always aspire to what they see as good.
So if we know God for who he is, and we know the grace that he has shown us, we will see that grace as good, and want to show that same grace to others. If we love God, who loves us and shows us grace, our love for God will naturally overflow in love for others.
Or, to put it backwards: if we don’t love others, we will know that we don’t really love God either, because if we loved him, that love would naturally spill over in love for others.
You see, Jesus’s parable is not a story; it is a test. This lawyer wants to include some and exclude others from his love; but in so doing, he is revealing what his love for God is like. Jesus says, “Your love for those who are unlovable is the measure of your love for God. However you love others—no matter who they are—that’s how much you love God, and no more.”
mais que c’était à nous de faire le bon choix et d’accepter ce don du salut,
Serious racial and religious undertones
Now, the question is, what does this have to do with salvation? How is it that Jesus can tell the lawyer that if he loves God and loves others, he will have eternal life?
The man: a Jew (going from Jerusalem to Jericho)
3 men cross his path:
To answer that question, we have to remember what has come before.
A priest (?)
Loving others is an absolutely necessary characteristic of someone who loves God. Loving God is an absolutely necessary characteristic of someone who knows God. Knowing God is an absolutely necessary characteristic of someone who belongs to him.
A Levite (Jewish too)
And we cannot know God unless the Son reveals him to us. We cannot know God unless our names were written in heaven before the foundation of the world.
A Samaritan (enemies of the Jews)
You see, loving God and loving others is not a condition for salvation; it is a result of salvation.
You love the Father when the Son reveals him to you. As you grow in your knowledge and understanding of him, in your relationship with him, you love him more and more.
And the proof of your love for him is that your love for God overflows in love for others.
Do this—see and hear what the Son has given you to see and hear; thank him for his grace and grow in your understanding of it; remember that the person you love the least is loved by God as much as you are—and you will live.
The one who showed him mercy is his neighbor.
You don’t do this to live; you do this because you live.
When babies are born, if they are alive, they take a first breath. If they never take that first breath, they will die. But their breathing is instinctive. It is a reflex of their living body being born. They don’t force themselves to breathe; that first, painful breath comes all by itself, and from that point on, they grow in it. Their breathing comes easier; their lungs become stronger.
“Go and do likewise.”
Babies don’t breathe in order to live; they breathe because they live.
We don’t love God and love others in order to be saved. We love others because we love God, and we love God because the Son saved us, and revealed his Father to us through his Spirit.

The Test

The context: coming immediately after a very Calvinist text, how are we to take this “Do these things and you will inherit eternal life” business?
So this text puts us in front of the same test today.
Illustration: babies, when they are born, if they are alive, take a first breath. If they never take that first breath, they will die. But their breathing is instinctive. It is a reflex of their living body being born. They don’t force themselves to breathe; they take a first, painful breath, and they grow in their capacity to breathe as they get older.
Calvinists are people who believe what the Bible says about God sovereignty over salvation—who believe all the things we affirmed last week. But a lot of people hate the term “Calvinist” because they know that Calvinists have the reputation of being among the most unloving bunch in Christianity.
And although I hate to say it, they’re right.
Why is that? Part of it is that Calvinists tend to misunderstand the point of God’s sovereignty. They reduce it to a cold calculation: God has chosen some for salvation, so if he desires to save them he will take care of it.
If that is all you take from the doctrine of God’s sovereignty, you are totally missing the point.
Last week I was talking to a few people after the service, and one of them mentioned her first response after hearing about these truths for the first time. Most people’s reaction is, “Why would God choose something like that? Why wouldn’t he choose to save everyone?” It’s a good question, but it’s not the first reaction those truths are meant to produce in us.
This sister said, “And all I could think was, It’s INSANE, how much God must love me, if he would choose to save ME like that!
THAT is the point. All the Bible’s talk of God’s sovereignty is meant to drive us in that one direction—awe at God’s love to undeserving sinners, and awe at his power to give them the grace they needed. Those who understand everything that God did not just to make salvation possible for them, but to actually save them, should be positively overwhelmed with God’s love and grace to them.
And if they are, their love for this gracious God will, inevitably, overflow in love for others.
Those who believe in God’s sovereignty over our salvation should be the most loving Christians on the planet.
So this parable puts us before a test today.
Try to think of where your love for people would meet its limits. What Jesus says is far more specific than simply telling us to “love other people.”
What does it mean to Love God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength? It means knowing him for who he is, and being appropriately thankful, giving him the honor and respect and love which is due him.
If we do this, we will recognize his grace toward us as an absolute good: and human beings always aspire to what they see as good. Our love for God, who loves us and shows us grace, will thus naturally overflow in love for others.
He’s saying, “Love those people you don’t love.”
If we know God for who he is, we will know what he did for our salvation. Even before the coming of Christ, his gracious giving of the Law was enough for his people to be thankful for his benevolent rule and care for them. We have all the more reason to be thankful and love him now, all the more reason to see love for others as the overflow of our love for God.
The parable of the good samaritan is a test for the heart of the lawyer. It is a test of his love for God. He is meant to identify with one of these people. Who would he more likely be? The priest/Levite? Or the Samaritan? Given his obvious searching for a loophole, probably the former two.
He is meant to leave with a conviction that he doesn’t love God as he may have imagined, and with a desire to love God the way he ought. Jesus doesn’t condemn him, but encourages and commands him: “Go, and do likewise.”
For an equivalent test today: try to think of where your love for people would meet its limits. It’s much more specific than “Love people.” It’s “Love those people you don’t love.”
Which person—or type of person—do you have a hard time loving? What people bother you? What type of person do you feel a natural resistance toward? What people would you find it difficult to help? to be kind to? to be patient with? to care for?
You need to know, because the way you love those people is the measure of your love for God.
And if your love for God is as small as that, you don’t understand what he did for you, or who he is, nearly as well as you ought to.
I’m not saying all this to condemn you or judge you or make you feel bad. Look at what Jesus did—he asks the lawyer which of the three travelers proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers. The lawyer responds, “The one who showed him mercy.”
V. 37:
And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.”
He doesn’t condemn the man, or suggest that he doesn’t love God. He points out the discrepancy; he points out the man’s weak love for God; and he points him in the right direction.
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.
He says, “No matter how hard love is for you, work at it. Go do it. GROW in your love for others; GROW in your love for God.”
Test yourselves, brothers and sisters, against this parable. Let your good doctrine drive you in the right direction. Go, and do like the Good Samaritan—know God as he is; know the grace that he showed you in Christ before the world began; love him, and let your love for him overflow in love for others.
Or to say it another way: Remember last week. Jesus gave us reasons to rejoice: that our names are written in heaven, that God has chosen to hide his plan from the wise and understanding and reveal them to children, and that Jesus has chosen to show us things other people have wanted to see but have not.
And we teased out four results of these truths, four things which will be present in our lives if we really take these things to heart: humility, gratitude, assurance and joy. But we see here a fifth and a sixth result of those same truths: love for God, measured by our love for others.
Love God, love others. "Do this, and you will live.”
The responsible follow-up question is, “How do I love God and others?”
You love the Father when the Son reveals him to you. As you grow in your knowledge and understanding of him, in your relationship with him, you love him more and more.
And the proof of your love for him is that your love for God overflows in love for others.
et que tout le monde est capable de faire cela.
Do this—see and hear what the Son has given you to see and hear; thank him for his grace and grow in your understanding of it; remember that the person you love the least is loved by God as much as you are—and you will live.
You don’t do this to live; you do this because you live.
Illustration: babies, when they are born, if they are alive, take a first breath. If they never take that first breath, they will die. But their breathing is instinctive. It is a reflex of their living body being born. They don’t force themselves to breathe; they take a first, painful breath, and they grow in their capacity to breathe as they get older.

Love for people, or the lack of it, reveals the quality and effectiveness of the philosophy we hold. And from a Biblical perspective our love for people is even more revealing, because it actually indicates the authenticity and health of our relationship with God. The two divisions of the Ten Commandments teach this explicitly. The first division, the first four commandments, all demand and enhance our love for God and are summed up in the Shema: “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. Love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength” (Deuteronomy 6:4, 5). The concluding six commandments, the second table of the Law, all demand that we love others and are capsulized in the words of Leviticus 19:18: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” The spiritual logic is clear: you must first love God with all that is in you, and if you do, you will be able to love others as you love yourself. Love for God produces love for people.

Turning this spiritual logic on its head, we are able to discern one’s love for God by the existence of a love for others. Love for God is difficult to see, but love for people is subject to relational verification. Significantly, Paul, writing to the Galatians, quoted Leviticus 19:18 as shorthand for keeping the whole law: “The entire law is summed up in a single command: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’ ” (5:14). Does this mean we can earn salvation by being a good neighbor? No. We can only love our neighbor as ourselves if we love God with all that is in us and allow him to work in our hearts. No philosophy can do that, not even the best religious philosophy.

Alors quand je lisais ma Bible, j’arrivais parfois devant des textes comme celui de la semaine dernière, et je n’avais aucune idée de quoi faire avec eux.
La semaine dernière on a entendu Jésus dire (au v. 22) que :
…personne ne sait qui est le Fils, si ce n’est le Père, ni qui est le Père, si ce n’est le Fils et celui à qui le Fils veut le révéler.
Alors il dit qu’il est impossible de connaître Dieu jusqu’à ce que le Fils nous révèle le Père. Ça, ça va. Mais juste avant, au v. 20, il dit à ses disciples qu’ils devraient se réjouir que :
…vos noms sont inscrits dans le ciel.
Et dans , Jean nous dit que si nos noms sont inscrits dans le ciel, ils y étaient déjà inscrits avant la création du monde.
Ce sont des choses dont la plupart des chrétiens n’aiment pas parler, et elles sont partout dans la Bible.
Après la réforme protestante, on utilise les formulations suivantes. La Bible nous parle de :
la dépravation des hommes et des femmes : que les êtres humains sont totalement incapables de venir à Dieu, parce que nous sommes morts dans nos péchés () ;
l’élection de Dieu : qu’avant la création du monde, Dieu a souverainement choisi qui il allait sauver (, ) ;
La rédemption définie : elle nous dit que ceux que Dieu a choisi de sauver, il sauvera absolument, parce que l’œuvre de Jésus a obtenu notre salut (Ezékiel 36.25-27, ) ;
La grâce irrésistible : elle nous dit que ceux que le Père attire vers lui viendront irrésistiblement à lui (Jean 10.4-16) ;
La persévérance des saints : et que ceux qui sont sauvés aujourd’hui seront toujours sauvés, parce que Dieu les fera persévérer jusqu’à la fin ().
Lorsque j’ai enfin découvert ces vérités autour de mes 25 ans, tous ces textes qui me laissaient perplexe avant avaient du sens pour la première fois. Je les ai accueilli, et je les aime encore, et j’étais un chrétien joyeux pour la première fois. (Je ne sais pas comment un chrétien peut être joyeux sans croire ces choses.)
Mais ensuite, j’ai continué de lire, et j’ai été de nouveau perplexe.
Parce qu’il semblait y avoir d’autres textes—les textes dont la plupart des chrétiens aiment bien parler—qui semblaient aller dans l’autre sens : un texte qui place l’emphase sur notre responsabilité de faire ce qui est bien.
Le texte d’aujourd’hui est un de ces textes. C’est un texte que même les non chrétiens connaissent bien—dans le texte d’aujourd’hui Jésus racontera la parabole du bon samaritain.
Puisque la parabole est bien-connue, on va faire des choses un peu différemment aujourd’hui. On va lire le texte du début à la fin, et puis on va le regarder sous trois angles différents. On va parler de la manière dont les gens comprennent d’habitude ce texte ; puis on va se demander pourquoi Luc, l’auteur de cet évangile, a fait les choix qu’il a fait quand il l’a écrit ; et enfin on va parler du vrai sens du texte.
Le texte (10.25-37)
25Un professeur de la loi se leva et dit à Jésus pour le mettre à l’épreuve: «Maître, que dois-je faire pour hériter de la vie éternelle?»
26Jésus lui dit: «Qu’est-il écrit dans la loi? Qu’y lis-tu?»
27Il répondit: «Tu aimeras le Seigneur, ton Dieu, de tout ton cœur, de toute ton âme, de toute ta force et de toute ta pensée, et ton prochain comme toi-même.»
28«Tu as bien répondu, lui dit Jésus. Fais cela et tu vivras.»
29 Mais lui, voulant se justifier, dit à Jésus: «Et qui est mon prochain?»
30Jésus reprit la parole et dit: «Un homme descendait de Jérusalem à Jéricho. Il tomba entre les mains de brigands qui le dépouillèrent, le rouèrent de coups et s’en allèrent en le laissant à moitié mort. 31Un prêtre qui, par hasard, descendait par le même chemin vit cet homme et passa à distance. 32De même aussi un Lévite arriva à cet endroit; il le vit et passa à distance. 33Mais un Samaritain qui voyageait arriva près de lui et fut rempli de compassion lorsqu’il le vit. 34Il s’approcha et banda ses plaies en y versant de l’huile et du vin; puis il le mit sur sa propre monture, le conduisit dans une auberge et prit soin de lui. 35Le lendemain, [à son départ,] il sortit deux pièces d’argent, les donna à l’aubergiste et dit: ‘Prends soin de lui, et ce que tu dépenseras en plus, je te le rendrai à mon retour.’ 36Lequel de ces trois te semble avoir été le prochain de celui qui était tombé au milieu des brigands?»
37«C’est celui qui a agi avec bonté envers lui», répondit le professeur de la loi. Jésus lui dit [donc]: «Va agir de la même manière, toi aussi.»
Ce que les gens comprennent d’habitude
Aucune grande surprise là ; c’est tellement simple qu’un petit enfant peut le comprendre.
Les gens pensent connaître l’histoire. Un homme demande à Jésus comment être sauvé ; Jésus lui rappelle les deux grands composants de la Loi ; et il l’illustre en parlant d’un homme qui se fait attaquer, puis deux de ses compatriotes—des hommes pieux en plus—qui passent à côté sans l’aider, et un samaritain—les ennemis des Juifs—qui l’aide et prend soin de lui.
Et Jésus dit : « Va agir de la même manière, toi aussi. »
Alors voici, grosso modo, ce que les gens comprennent d’habitude de cette histoire : qu’aimer les autres est plus important que croire en une foi particulière ou qu’obéir à une code religieux particulière. Aime les autres, et tu prouveras le bien qui est dans ton cœur, et Dieu t’acceptera—peu importe ce que tu crois.
Si on le lit superficiellement et hors contexte, c’est bien ce que Jésus semble dire. C’est vrai qu’il dit : « Aime l’Éternel ton Dieu, » mais dans l’histoire—l’exemple qu’il donne pour illustrer ce qu’il veut dire—il ne parle pas de Dieu, du tout. Et sa conclusion à tout ce qu’il dit, après que le professeur reconnaît que le « prochain » dans l’histoire est celui qui a montré de la bonté, c’est de dire : « Va et fais de même—agis avec bonté envers les autres. Aime ton prochain. »
Les non croyants aiment bien ce texte, parce qu’il leur permet de dire que Jésus était un enseignant moral excellent, et que le problème du christianisme se trouve dans ce que les chrétiens on fait de Jésus. Ils disent que pour vraiment suivre Jésus, on doit faire ce qu’il a fait : on doit aimer les autres. S’occuper de ceux qui sont sans défense. C’est une manière honorable de vivre—c’est quelque chose dont on devrait tous aspirer.
Cette dernière partie n’est pas fausse—c’est une manière honorable de vivre, et c’est quelque chose dont on devrait tous aspirer. C’est la première partie qui est problématique. Cette parabole ne place pas l’altruisme au-dessus de la foi. Ce n’est pas un moyen pour nous de « gagner » notre salut par notre bonté. Si tu veux que ce soit le message de cette parabole, tu dois oublier tout ce qui vient avant ce texte et tout ce qui vient après.
Alors quel est l’alternatif ?
Luc le théologien
Pour répondre à cette question, nous devons faire un pas de recul—un grand pas de recul. Il faut parler de la manière dont la Bible a été écrite. Dans 2 Timothée 3.16, l’apôtre Paul dit à Timothée :
16 Toute l’Ecriture est inspirée de Dieu et utile pour enseigner, pour convaincre, pour corriger, pour instruire dans la justice, 17afin que l’homme de Dieu soit formé et équipé pour toute œuvre bonne.
Lorsque Paul dit que toute l’Écriture est « inspirée de Dieu, » il veut dire que le Saint-Esprit a divinement inspiré les auteurs humains à écrire exactement ce qu’il voulait qu’ils écrivent, tout en les permettant de se servir de leurs propres méthodes et personnalités pour faire passer son message. C’est le partenariat ultime. Les auteurs humains, avec leurs propres cerveaux, sous l’inspiration de l’Esprit, ont écrit exactement ce que Dieu voulait qu’ils écrivent, comme il voulait qu’ils l’écrivent.
Alors quand on lit la Bible, et ce passage en particulier aujourd’hui, nous devons non pas seulement demander : « Qu’est-ce que Dieu essaie de nous dire dans ce passage ? » mais aussi « Qu’est-ce que Luc essaie de nous dire dans ce passage ? » William Taylor fait le rappel utile que lorsqu’il écrivait son évangile, Luc n’était pas seulement un auteur qui écrivait ce qui s’est passé : il faisait le travail d’un théologien. Luc est notre guide pour l’interprétation de son évangile. Il écrivait ce qui s’est passé, mais il l’écrivait d’une certaine manière, il mettait les choses dans le bon ordre, pour que nous comprenions quelque chose de précis.
Et tout le monde qui lit sait que c’est ainsi que les livres fonctionnent : l’ordre des événements dans un livre est souvent aussi important que les événements eux-mêmes ; et ce n’est pas toujours utile d’écrire les choses de manière chronologique. Si un auteur raconte une histoire du passé d’un personnage au début d’un livre, elle n’aura peut-être pas beaucoup de sens. S’il raconte la même histoire vers la fin du livre, elle aura un tout autre sens à cause de ce qui l’a précédé.
Alors voici la question qu’on doit se poser : Pourquoi Luc a-t-il choisi de placer cette parabole ici, juste après le passage qu’on a vu dimanche dernier ? Ce n’est pas seulement une question de chronologie—et on le sait parce que les deux textes parlent du même sujet.
Le passage qu’on a vu dimanche dernier a placé beaucoup d’emphase sur la souveraineté de Dieu sur le salut, comme on a vu. Jésus se réjouit que c’était le plaisir de Dieu de cacher son plan de salut de certains et de le révéler à d’autres. Il nous dit que si nous venons au Père, c’est parce que le Fils a choisi de nous révéler le Père. Au v. 17-24, il parle de comment fonctionne le salut.
Et puis on arrive au v. 25, et Luc ne change pas de sujet—la question que le professeur pose à Jésus concerne aussi comment fonctionne le salut : il dit : Maître, que dois-je faire pour hériter de la vie éternelle ? C’est le même sujet.
Alors, étant donné ce qu’on a vu dimanche dernier, on s’attendrait à ce que Jésus dise : « Si tu veux hériter la vie éternelle, il faut que je te révèle le Père. »
C’est vrai—mais ce n’est pas ce qu’il dit. Il demande au professeur (v. 26) : Qu’est-il écrit dans la loi ? Alors au v. 27, le professeur donne le résumé de la Loi :
«Tu aimeras le Seigneur, ton Dieu, de tout ton cœur, de toute ton âme, de toute ta force et de toute ta pensée, et ton prochain comme toi-même.»
Et Jésus dit (v. 28) : «Tu as bien répondu. Fais cela et tu vivras.»
Est-ce que Luc a oublié ce qu’il vient d’écrire ? Est-ce qu’il suffit de faire l’effort pour aimer Dieu et pour aimer les autres si on veut être sauvé ? Comment Luc aurait-il pu ne pas voir cette contradiction ?
Evidemment—ce n’est pas une contradiction.
Lorsqu’on arrive devant deux textes qui semblent se contredire, on n’accepte pas l’un pour rejeter l’autre. On interprète plutôt l’un texte à la lumière de l’autre, et les deux textes à la lumière de toute la Bible.
Luc a placé cette parabole, qui parle des choix qu’on fait et l’amour qu’on montre aux autres, ici, juste après ce texte sur la souveraineté de Dieu sur le salut, pour nous obliger de faire ce travail, pour qu’on voie comment le choix de Dieu d’un côté, et notre choix de l’autre, vont ensemble.
Fruit de la grâce souveraine
La question
Alors le professeur de la loi vient à Jésus et lui demande (v. 25) :
« Maître, que dois-je faire pour hériter de la vie éternelle ? »
Une question excellente—si seulement plus de gens la posaient.
Jésus comme il fait si souvent, répond à la question par une autre question (v. 26) :
26Jésus lui dit: «Qu’est-il écrit dans la loi? Qu’y lis-tu?»
27Il répondit: «Tu aimeras le Seigneur, ton Dieu, de tout ton cœur, de toute ton âme, de toute ta force et de toute ta pensée, et ton prochain comme toi-même.»
C’est une citation du texte que nous avons lu ce matin pendant la louange—elle vient de Deutéronome 6, qui (comme Loanne a dit) contient une sorte de confession de foi pour le peuple d’Israël. Toute la Loi peut se résumer dans ces deux impératifs—aimez Dieu, aimez les autres.
Et Jésus dit au professeur qu’il a raison.
La question, c’est : « Qu’est-ce que ça veut dire d’aimer Dieu, et d’aimer son voisin ? » Ou plutôt, ça devrait être la question. Mais ce n’est pas celle que le professeur pose. Luc dit au v. 29 :
29 Mais lui, voulant se justifier, dit à Jésus: «Et qui est mon prochain?»
Autrement dit : cet homme savait parfaitement bien qu’il y avait des gens qu’il aurait du mal à aimer. Il savait qu’il obéissait à cette Loi pour certaines personnes, mais pas d’autres. Et il veut que Jésus confirme que ce n’est pas grave : qu’il y a certaines personnes qui tombent dans la catégorie de « mes voisins » et d’autres qui ne le font pas.
Mais Jésus le déçoit en racontant sa parabole.
La parabole
Un homme voyage de Jérusalem à Jéricho, Jésus dit—alors on comprend que c’est un Juif, comme le professeur. Cet homme se fait attaquer, battre et voler. On le laisse pour mourir. Dans les minutes qui suivent, il arrive un prêtre. Les prêtres étaient des descendants d’Aaron, et ils avaient des responsabilités dans le temple de Jérusalem. Alors il est aussi Juif. Et il passe de l’autre côté. Après cela, il arrive un Lévite—les Lévites étaient issus de la tribu de Lévi, et servaient comme les assistants aux prêtres. Alors il est aussi Juif. (Tous les deux, d’ailleurs, auraient été dans le même « groupe social » que ce professeur de la Loi.) Le Lévite passe aussi de l’autre côté.
Deux hommes juifs, membres de l’élite religieuse, qui laissent un de leurs compatriots mourir par terre.
Et au v. 33 Jésus prononce trois mots qui ont surement gêné le professeur :
Mais un Samaritain…
Les Samaritains et les Juifs se détestaient. Ils avaient les mêmes racines ancestrales, mais ils s’étaient séparés les uns des autres des siècles avant, et l’animosité entre eux n’a cessé de grandir depuis.
Avec ces trois mots, le professeur se serait dit : Non—surement Jésus ne fait pas que le Samaritain soit le GENTIL dans cette histoire ! Un Samaritain était précisément le type de personne pour laquelle cet israélite distingué essayait de se justifier, le type de personne qu’il n’aurait jamais imaginé aimer.
Mais dans l’histoire de Jésus, c’est le Samaritain qui vient à côté de ce Juif, qui panse ses blessures et qui le soigne et qui paie les frais de son rétablissement.
Et au v. 36, quand Jésus conclut l’histoire, il la retourne contre le professeur. Il lui demande :
36Lequel de ces trois te semble avoir été le prochain de celui qui était tombé au milieu des brigands?»
37«C’est celui qui a agi avec bonté envers lui», répondit le professeur de la loi.
Vous voyez ce qu’il a fait ? Le professeur, qui cherchait à se justifier, avait demandé : Qui est mon prochain ? Autrement dit : Qui est-ce que je suis obligé d’aimer ?
Mais Jésus retourne sa question : dans sa parabole, ce n’était pas celui qui a reçu l’amour qui est le « prochain, » mais celui qui l’a donné.
Autrement dit, quand le professeur demande « Qui est mon prochain ? », Jésus répond : « C’est toi. C’est toi, le ‘prochain.’ Qui sont les autres n’a aucune importance. »
Le sens
Les implications de cela sont choquantes. Selon ce que dit Jésus, le professeur aurait compris que c’était possible qu’un Samaritain—quelqu’un que les Juifs voyaient comme infidèle et idolâtre—de mieux aimer Dieu qu’un prêtre ou un Lévite. La preuve, c’est qu’il a aimé cet homme qu’il avait toutes les raisons sociales et culturelles pour ne pas aimer.
Vous voyez cela ? Si la Loi peut se résumer en ces deux impératifs—aimer Dieu et aimer les autres—ces deux choses vont ensemble. On ne peut pas aimer Dieu sans aimer son prochain. On peut peut-être aimer son prochain sans aimer Dieu—à partir de l’altruisme simple—mais on ne peut pas aimer Dieu sans aimer les autres.
Alors du coup ce passage, dans son contexte et avec ce que Luc a dit dans le passage précédent, nous donne maintenant la réponse à une question que le professeur n’a jamais demandé, mais qu’il aurait dû : Qu’est-ce que ça veut dire d’aimer Dieu et d’aimer mon prochain ?
Aimer Dieu veut dire connaître Dieu pour qui il est, et lui donner l’honneur et le respect et la reconnaissance qui lui est dû. Et si nous connaissons Dieu pour qui il est, nous connaîtrons la grâce qu’il nous a montrés, et nous reconnaîtrons sa grâce envers nous comme un bien absolu.
Et voici le truc : les êtres humains aspirent toujours à ce qu’ils considère comme un bien absolu. Ce que nous considérons comme bien, c’est ce que nous voudrons être et faire. Si je vois le fait d’avoir des enfants comme une bonne chose, je voudrais avoir des enfants. Si je vois le fait d’aider les pauvres comme un bien, je voudrais aider les pauvres. Et c’est vrai même si ce qu’on trouve bien n’est pas vraiment bien—si je considère le plaisir hédoniste comme bon, je voudrais obtenir autant de plaisir pour moi que possible, peu importe à quel point c’est égoïste. Les gens aspirent toujours à ce qu’ils considère comme un bien.
Alors si nous connaissons Dieu pour qui il est, et nous connaissons la grâce qu’il nous a montré, nous allons voir à quel point sa grâce envers nous est bonne, et nous aspirerons à cette grâce : nous voudrons montrer cette même grâce aux autres. Si nous connaissons l’amour et la grâce que Dieu nous a montrés, nous l’aimerons en retour, et notre amour pour Dieu débordera naturellement en amour pour les autres.
Ou, pour le dire inversement : si nous n’aimons pas les autres, nous saurons que nous n’aimons pas vraiment Dieu, car si on l’aimait, cet amour déborderait naturellement en amour pour les autres.
Vous voyez, la parabole de Jésus n’est pas une histoire ; c’est un test. Le professeur veut inclure certaines personnes dans son amour, et en exclure d’autres ; mais en faisant ainsi, il révèle à quoi ressemble son amour pour Dieu. Jésus dit : « Ton amour pour ceux qui sont durs à aimer, c’est la mesure de ton amour pour Dieu. A la mesure que tu aimes les autres—peu importe qui ils sont—c’est ainsi que tu aimes Dieu. »
Le salut et l’amour
Alors, la question, c’est quel rapport avec le salut ? C’était ça, la question du professeur. Comment Jésus peut-il dire que s’il aime Dieu et aime les autres, il héritera la vie éternelle ?
Pour répondre à cette question, nous devons nous souvenir de ce qui est venu avant.
L’amour pour les autres est un attribut absolument nécessaire de quelqu’un qui aime Dieu. L’amour pour Dieu est un attribut absolument nécessaire de quelqu’un qui connaît Dieu. La connaissance de Dieu est un attribut absolument nécessaire de quelqu’un qui lui appartient.
Et nous ne pouvons pas connaître Dieu à moins que le Fils nous le révèle. Nous ne pouvons pas connaître Dieu à moins que nos noms soient inscrits dans le ciel avant la création du monde.
Vous voyez, l’amour pour Dieu et pour les autres n’est pas une condition du salut ; c’est le résultat du salut.
Tu aimes le Père lorsque le Fils te le révèle. Alors que tu grandis dans ta connaissance et dans ta compréhension de lui, dans ta relation avec lui, tu l’aimes de plus en plus.
Et la preuve de ton amour pour lui—une preuve que le Fils t’a vraiment révélé le Père—c’est que ton amour pour Dieu déborde en amour pour les autres.
On n’aimes pas ça pour vivre ; on aime parce qu’on vit.
Lorsque les bébés naissent, ils prennent un premier souffle. S’ils ne prennent jamais ce premier souffle, ils mourront. Mais cet acte de respirer est instinctif. C’est le reflex de leur corps vivant qui naît. Ils ne font pas d’effort pour respirer ; ce premier souffle douloureux vient tout seul, et à partir de ce moment-là, ils grandissent dans cet acte. La respiration devient plus facile ; les poumons deviennent de plus en plus forts.
Les bébés ne respirent pas afin de vivre ; ils respirent parce qu’ils vivent.
Nous n’aimons pas Dieu et les autres afin d’être sauvés. Nous aimons les autres parce que nous aimons Dieu, et nous aimons Dieu parce que le Fils nous a sauvés, et nous a révélé le Père par son Esprit.
Le Test
Alors ce texte nous place devant le même test aujourd’hui.
Ce n’est pas un grand secret : dans cette église nous tenons à des doctrines qui sont typiquement étiquetées « calvinistes. » Je préfère qu’on les appelle simplement « bibliques. » Les calvinistes sont simplement des chrétiens qui croient ce que la Bible dit sur la souveraineté de Dieu sur le salut—qui croient tout ce qu’on a dit dimanche dernier.
Mais beaucoup de gens n’aiment pas le terme « calviniste » parce que les calvinistes ont la réputation d’être parmi les chrétiens les moins aimants.
Et même si je n’aime pas le dire, la réputation n’est pas entièrement fausse. Contrairement à, par exemple, nos frères et sœurs charismatiques, qui sont exubérants et joyeux, les calvinistes peut être souvent froids, analytiques et sévères.
Pourquoi ? En partie, c’est parce que même si les calvinistes en général saisissent la vérité de la souveraineté de Dieu, ils ont tendance à rater le but. On le réduit à un calcul froid : Dieu a choisi ses enfants, alors il les sauvera, et c’est tout.
Si c’est tout ce que tu apprends de la doctrine de la souveraineté de Dieu, tu es tombé totalement à côté de la plaque.
La semaine dernière je discutais avec des gens après le culte, et une sœur a parlé de sa première réponse après avoir entendu ces vérités pour la première fois. La réaction de la plupart des gens, c’est : « Mais pourquoi Dieu choisirait-il cela ? Pourquoi il ne sauve pas tout le monde, peu importe ce qu’il croit ? » C’est une bonne question, et il y a une réponse—mais ce n’est pas la première réaction que ces vérités devraient produire en nous.
Cette sœur disait : « Quand j’ai entendu ça, tout ce que je me disais, c’était : Mais c’est FOU, combien Dieu doit m’aimer, pour me sauver ainsi ! »
ÇA, c’est le but. Tout ce que la Bible dit sur la souveraineté de Dieu est là pour nous pousser dans ce sens-là : l’émerveillement à l’amour de Dieu pour les pécheurs qui ne méritent pas son amour, et l’émerveillement à sa puissance pour accomplir parfaitement son plan. Ceux qui comprennent ce que Dieu a fait, non seulement pour rendre le salut possible pour eux, mais pour les sauver réellement et définitivement, devraient être complètement submergés par l’émerveillement à l’amour de Dieu envers eux.
Et s’ils le sont, leur amour pour ce Dieu de grâce va inévitablement déborder en amour pour les autres.
Ceux qui croient en la souveraineté de Dieu sur notre salut devraient être les chrétiens les plus fidèles et les plus aimants de la planète.
Alors cette parabole nous place devant un test aujourd’hui.
Essayez de penser à là où votre amour pour les autres atteint ses limites. Ce que Jésus dit est bien plus précis que de simplement dire : « Aimez les autres. »
Il dit : « Aimez ceux que vous n’aimez pas. »
Quelles personnes—ou quels types de personnes—avez-vous du mal à aimer ? Quelles personnes vous gênent ? Pour quel type de personne ressentez-vous une résistance naturelle ? Quelles personnes auriez-vous du mal à aider ? Envers quelles personnes auriez-vous du mal à montrer de la bienveillance ? De la patience ?
Il faut le savoir, parce que la manière dont vous aimez ces gens-là, c’est la mesure de votre amour pour Dieu.
Et si votre amour pour Dieu est aussi petit que ça, alors vous ne comprenez pas sa souveraineté—vous ne comprenez pas qui il EST—aussi bien que vous imaginez.
Je ne dis pas cela pour vous condamner ou pour vous juger ou pour vous culpabiliser. Regardez à ce que Jésus a fait—il demande au professeur lequel des trois voyageurs a été le prochain de l’homme blessé. Le professeur dit : « Celui qui a agi avec bonté envers lui.
V. 37:
Jésus lui dit [donc]: «Va agir de la même manière, toi aussi.»
Il ne condamne pas le professeur, il ne suggère pas qu’il n’aime pas Dieu. Il révèle le manque de cohérence en lui ; il révèle l’amour faible qu’il a pour Dieu ; et il le redirige dans le bon sens.
Peu importe combien vous trouvez l’amour pour certains difficile, travaillez-y. Faites-le. Grandissez dans votre amour pour les autres ; grandissez dans votre amour pour Dieu.
Examinez-vous, frères et sœurs, à la lumière de cette parabole. Que votre bonne doctrine vous pousse dans le bon sens. Allez, et agissez comme le bon Samaritain—connaissez Dieu tel qu’il est ; connaissez la grâce qu’il vous a montré en Jésus-Christ avant la création du monde ; aimez-le, et laissez votre amour déborder en amour pour les autres.
Related Media
Related Sermons