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Gospel of Mark

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Mark chapter 1

1. describes the cherubim around God’s throne as beings with four faces: a lion, a calf, a man, and an eagle. By long tradition, the church has attributed one of these “faces” to each of the Gospels, according to the character and message of the particular Gospel. In the cathedrals of Europe this motif is repeated again and again by carvings or paintings of each one of these creatures, typically with a book. By tradition, the creature that represents the Gospel of Mark is the calf or the ox – a creature of work and service. The Gospel of Mark shows Jesus as the Servant of God, as a Workman of God.
The first three gospels, Matthew, Mark and Luke, are always known as the synoptic gospels. The word synoptic comes from two Greek words which mean to see together; and these three are called the synoptic gospels because they can be set down in parallel columns and their common matter looked at together.
about ad 65.
The Gospel of Mark
He was the son of a lady of Jerusalem whose name was Mary, and whose house was a rallying point and meeting place of the early Church ().

12 So, when he had considered this, he came to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose surname was Mark, where many were gathered together praying. 13 And as Peter knocked at the door of the gate, a girl named Rhoda came to answer. 14 When she recognized Peter’s voice, because of her gladness she did not open the gate, but ran in and announced that Peter stood before the gate. 15 But they said to her, “You are beside yourself!” Yet she kept insisting that it was so. So they said, “It is his angel.”

16 Now Peter continued knocking; and when they opened the door and saw him, they were astonished.

From the very beginning Mark was brought up in the very centre of the Christian fellowship.
Mark was also the nephew of Barnabas, and when Paul and Barnabas set out on their first missionary journey they took Mark with them
for some reason Mark left the mission trip and went home ().
He may have gone home because he was scared to face the dangers of what was one of the most difficult and dangerous roads in the world, a road hard to travel and covered with robbers. He may have gone home because the mission trip was being lead by Paul, and Mark might have had disapproval that his uncle Barnabas was not in charge. He may have gone home because he did not agree with the way Paul was doing things.
We don’t know
Usually when this section of scripture those that identify with Barnabas think he was right to encourage Mark and offer him another chance. Those that identify with Paul say things like Mark was a wuss.
We do not know exactly what happened and I would not be willing to judge neither Paul or Barnabas as being in the wrong.
Paul and Barnabas completed their first missionary journey and then getting ready to set out upon their second. Barnabas was excited to take Mark with them again. But Paul refused to have anything to do with Mark for bailing on them in Pamphylia’ ().
The outcome ended up good in the end. The mission continued and Mark was restored and became an asset o Paul in his dying days.
Mark returns with Paul
It is in Mark’s gospel, above all,
The Book
There can be little doubt that all these details are due to the fact that Peter was an eyewitness and was seeing these things again with the eye of memory
His style is not carefully developed and polished.
It is the way in which an eager child would tell the story.

1 The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. 2 As it is written in the Prophets:

“Behold, I send My messenger before Your face,

Who will prepare Your way before You.”

3 “The voice of one crying in the wilderness:

‘Prepare the way of the LORD;

Make His paths straight.’ ”

4 John came baptizing in the wilderness and preaching a baptism of repentance for the remission of sins. 5 Then all the land of Judea, and those from Jerusalem, went out to him and were all baptized by him in the Jordan River, confessing their sins.

6 Now John was clothed with camel’s hair and with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. 7 And he preached, saying, “There comes One after me who is mightier than I, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to stoop down and loose. 8 I indeed baptized you with water, but He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

The Book
describes the cherubim around God’s throne as beings with four faces: a lion, a calf, a man, and an eagle. By long tradition, the church has attributed one of these “faces” to each of the Gospels, according to the character and message of the particular Gospel. In Europe this is repeated again and again by carvings or paintings of each one of these creatures. By tradition, the creature that represents the Gospel of Mark is the calf or the ox – a creature of work and service. Mark shows Jesus as the Servant of God, as a Workman of God.
describes the cherubim around God’s throne as beings with four faces: a lion, a calf, a man, and an eagle. By long tradition, the church has attributed one of these “faces” to each of the Gospels, according to the character and message of the particular Gospel. In Europe this is repeated again and again by carvings or paintings of each one of these creatures. By tradition, the creature that represents the Gospel of Mark is the calf or the ox – a creature of work and service. Mark shows Jesus as the Servant of God, as a Workman of God.
The first three gospels, Matthew, Mark and Luke, are always known as the synoptic gospels. The word synoptic comes from two Greek words which mean to see together
The synoptic gospels because can be laid out next to each other compared the whole way through.
Mark is the earliest of all the gospels, it has been said to be the first life of Jesus that has come down to us.
Written in A.D. 65
Mark is capturing video snap chats, Just event after event to give you the picture of Jesus.
As we go through Marks account we get a picture of a Jesus who shared emotions and passions with us. The sheer humanity of Jesus in Mark’s snaps will brings him very near to us.
We will see the snaps of Jesus and the children, when Jesus rebuked the disciples for keeping the children from him. Only Mark finishes the scriptures describing the event with

16 And He took them up in His arms, laid His hands on them, and blessed them.

Mark adds visual details that the other gospels don’t
Peter was very close to Mark and as Peter was reliving these memories with John Mark present, John was taking screen shots in order to give us detailed pictures of Jesus.
Marks writing style is not carefully developed and polished as the other gospels.
It has been said Mark wrote in the way an eager child would tell the story.
Who was Mark
1 The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.

2 As it is written in the Prophets:

“Behold, I send My messenger before Your face,

Who will prepare Your way before You.”

3 “The voice of one crying in the wilderness:

‘Prepare the way of the LORD;

Make His paths straight.’ ”

2 As it is written in the Prophets:

“Behold, I send My messenger before Your face,

Who will prepare Your way before You.”

2 As it is written in the Prophets:

“Behold, I send My messenger before Your face,

Who will prepare Your way before You.”

3 “The voice of one crying in the wilderness:
‘Prepare the way of the Lord;
Make His paths straight.’ ”
When a king would travel through an area the roads were made ready ahead of time and this was true spiritually as there had been 400 years of silence from God and the religious leaders had the road to God so full of legal potholes that He could never be found.
when John the Baptizer emerged in the wilderness.
When John the Baptizer emerged in the wilderness he Prepared the way of the Lord;
This was true spiritually as there had been 400 years of silence from God and the religious leaders had religion exalted where God could not be found.
Made His paths straight with the preaching of repentance.

1 The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. 2 As it is written in the Prophets:

“Behold, I send My messenger before Your face,

Who will prepare Your way before You.”

3 “The voice of one crying in the wilderness:

‘Prepare the way of the LORD;

Make His paths straight.’ ”

4 John came baptizing in the wilderness and preaching a baptism of repentance for the remission of sins. 5 Then all the land of Judea, and those from Jerusalem, went out to him and were all baptized by him in the Jordan River, confessing their sins.

6 Now John was clothed with camel’s hair and with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. 7 And he preached, saying, “There comes One after me who is mightier than I, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to stoop down and loose. 8 I indeed baptized you with water, but He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

4 John came baptizing in the wilderness and preaching a baptism of repentance for the remission of sins.

It is in Mark’s gospel, above all, that we get a picture of a Jesus who shared emotions and passions with us. The sheer humanity of Jesus in Mark’s picture brings him very near to us.
Before remission of sin there must be repentance / a dyeing to self

5 Then all the land of Judea, and those from Jerusalem, went out to him and were all baptized by him in the Jordan River, confessing their sins.

In the lovely picture of Jesus and the children, when Jesus rebuked the disciples for keeping the children from him, only Mark finishes, ‘and he took them up in his arms, laid his hands on them, and blessed them’ (10:13–16; cf. Matthew 19:13–15; Luke 18:15–17). All the tenderness of Jesus is in these little vivid additions. When Mark is telling of the feeding of the 5,000, he alone tells how they sat down in hundreds and in fifties, looking like vegetable beds in a garden (6:40); and immediately the whole scene rises before us. When Jesus and his disciples were on the last journey to Jerusalem, only Mark tells us, ‘and Jesus was walking ahead of them’ (10:32; cf. Matthew 20:17; Luke 18:31); and in that one vivid little phrase all the loneliness of Jesus stands out. When Mark is telling the story of the stilling of the storm, he has one little sentence that none of the other gospel writers have. ‘He was in the stern, asleep on the cushion’ (4:38). And that one touch makes the picture vivid before our eyes.
Once sin is acknowledged it must me confessed

6 Now John was clothed with camel’s hair and with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey.

There can be little doubt that all these details are due to the fact that Peter was an eyewitness and was seeing these things again with the eye of memory
Our cultures are different, but I get the feeling that John wasn’t setting any trends in his day.

7 And he preached, saying, “There comes One after me who is mightier than I, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.

His style is not carefully developed and polished.
Job of the slave in the home

8 I indeed baptized you with water, but He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

It is the way in which an eager child would tell the story.

9 It came to pass in those days that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized by John in the Jordan.

10 And immediately, coming up from the water, He saw the heavens parting and the Spirit descending upon Him like a dove.

11 Then a voice came from heaven, “You are My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”

12 Immediately the Spirit drove Him into the wilderness.

13 And He was there in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan, and was with the wild beasts; and the angels ministered to Him.

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