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Text: "Then drew near unto him all the publicans and sinners for to hear him.
And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them."
Text: "Then drew near unto him all the publicans and sinners for to hear him.
And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them."
Theme: Jesus is not prejudice.
He is the friend of the down and out as we as the up and in.
Theme: Jesus is not prejudice.
He is the friend of the down and out as we as the up and in.
Date: 04/08/2018 File name: KingdomParables07.wpd
ID Number:
Date: 04/08/2018 File name: KingdomParables07.wpd
ID Number:
The parables of Jesus can be divided into three categories.
The first group teaches us about the characteristics of the Kingdom.
The second group teaches us about the characteristics of the King.
The third group teaches us about the characteristics of Kingdom citizens.
We spent about six weeks looking at the Parables of the Kingdom—that first group.
This evening, I want us to begin looking at the second group; Parables of the Kingdom’s King.
The parables of Jesus can be divided into three categories.
The first group teaches us about the characteristics of the Kingdom.
The second group teaches us about the characteristics of the King.
The third group teaches us about the characteristics of Kingdom citizens.
We spent about six weeks looking at the Parables of the Kingdom—that first group.
This evening, I want us to begin looking at the second group; Parables of the Kingdom’s King.
In this chapter, Jesus tells three parables: The Parable of the Lost Sheep, the Parable of the Lost Coin, and the Parable of the Lost Son.
Each parable teaches us something about God and each teaches us something about the sinner.
The first two verses of the chapter set up the situation for us.
Verses 1-2 remind us of the kind of people Jesus attracted.
They were common people.
They were people who had nothing to offer him, but to whom he had everything to offer.
One day, as Jesus is teaching the crowds who have followed him, he overhears some Pharisees and scribes—the religious elite of their day—mumbling.
They are questioning his fraternization with certain “questionable” individuals.
In their self-righteous eyes, Jesus has committed the politically incorrect social blunder—He has befriended sinners!
Now the tax collectors and “sinners” were all gathering around to hear him.
2 But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law muttered, “This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.”
(, NIV)
Now the tax collectors and “sinners” were all gathering around to hear him.
2 But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law muttered, “This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.”
(, NIV)
These religious leaders were criticizing Jesus for keeping company with sinners.
They complained that He was the “friend of sinners.”
He’s become to “chummy” with sinners.
Aren't ya glad he is?
Bailey Smith, a Southern Baptist evangelist and a past president of our convention, once said that too many of our churches have become "sacred societies for snubbing sinners."
I've been in some churches where that was true.
It was certainly true in Jesus' time.
The scribes and Pharisees were criticizing Jesus for keeping company with sinners.
In answer to their criticism, our Lord tells a series of parables.
They are parables that reveal just how great friend to sinners and outcasts Jesus is.
It was John Newton who said, “Two things I know: I am a great sinner, and Christ is a great Savior.
Each of us needs a friend like Jesus because we are all ‘great sinners’.
These religious leaders were criticizing Jesus for keeping company with sinners.
They complained that He was the “friend of sinners.”
He’s become to “chummy” with sinners.
Aren't ya glad he is?
Bailey Smith, a Southern Baptist evangelist and a past president of our convention, once said that too many of our churches have become "sacred societies for snubbing sinners."
I've been in some churches where that was true.
It was certainly true in Jesus' time.
The scribes and Pharisees were criticizing Jesus for keeping company with sinners.
In answer to their criticism, our Lord tells a series of parables.
They are parables that reveal just how great friend to sinners and outcasts Jesus is.
It was John Newton who said, “Two things I know: I am a great sinner, and Christ is a great Savior.
Each of us needs a friend like Jesus because we are all ‘great sinners’.
I. WE NEED A SAVIOR LIKE JESUS BECAUSE WE ARE ALL LIKE LOST SHEEP
1. the first story tells us that the sinner is weak and helpless like a sheep
“What man of you, having a hundred sheep, if he has lost one of them, does not leave
the ninety-nine in the open country, and go after the one that is lost, until he finds it?
"And when he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders, rejoicing.
"And when he comes home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost.’
"Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance."
(,ESV)
2. Jesus says that you and I are just like sheep
ILLUS.
When you and I hear that we’re sheep and Jesus is the shepherd, it makes us feel warm, and fuzzy.
We think of fluffy little lambs and green pastures and still waters.
But you need to know when the Bible calls him the Great Shepherd and us sheep, it is a very important and very well-meant spiritual insult.
a. we're weak and totally helpless and we’ve wandered away from the Great
Shepherd
3. Jesus reminds us that God is just like the shepherd
a.
He actively pursues lost sheep!
ILLUS.
Back in the early 1970s W. Phillip Keller wrote a book entitled A Shepherd Looks
at the 23rd Psalm.
In it he makes several observations: Sheep are dense, Sheep are dependent, and Sheep are defenseless.
A. SHEEP ARE WEAK AND HELPLESS BECAUSE THEY ARE DENSE
1. they're just not the smartest of animals
ILLUS.
On the raising of sheep, one commentator simply stated: “Einsteins they are
not.”
2. when a sheep is lost, it can't find its way home
a. they nibble hear and nibble there and just keep following their teeth
b. dogs will come home; cats will come home; even Salmon return to the mountain
brook they were hatched in
c. but sheep just keep wandering
ILLUS.
When sheep see grass, no matter where it is, no matter how steep or how
dangerous the spot, they go for the grass.
1) is it any wonder why the O.T. prophet Isaiah would write: "All we like sheep
have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all."
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