Faithlife Sermons

Fishing with Jesus

Luke: The Story of Jesus  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 1 view
Notes
Transcript
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →

Meeting someone famous

Have you ever met someone famous?
Maybe 5-10 years ago I was running a large youth camp for CMS Victoria and the sponsors organised for Justin Langer to come down and speak to us.
So I got to wait for him in the carpark, and follow him round and introduce him to people. It was all quite a buzz for a cricket mad kid.
Of course I remember when I met him I put out my hand to shake his and said Hi I’m Chris. And I remember him replying, G’day I’m Justin. And I kinda wanted to be like yeah I know, and your married to Sue and have 4 kids and your played 105 tests for Australia with a batting average of 45… But I refrained cause I thought that’d be kind stalkerish!
Here I was in the presence of greatness, and it felt cool. I got a photo. I got some kids to bowl some balls to him. I hung off his every word during his talk.
Well, Jesus is becoming a bit of a 1st century celebrity as we’re learning more about him in Luke’s gospel. He has this ministry of preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. He proclaims it in both word and deed. Preaching like we heard about last week and performing miracles of healing and deliverance. And people are flocking to see him and hear him. And I can imagine Peter being kinda in awe as he hangs out in this boat with Jesus, listening to all he says in our reading today.

Jesus teaches

As a measure of just how popular he is we see in the opening verses that the crowds are so huge that he has decided in our story today to push out into the water a little so he can address the crowd.
Luke 5:
Luke 5:1–3 TNIV
One day as Jesus was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret, the people were crowding around him and listening to the word of God. He saw at the water’s edge two boats, left there by the fishermen, who were washing their nets. He got into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, and asked him to put out a little from shore. Then he sat down and taught the people from the boat.
And one assumes the he teaches them about the good news of the kingdom of God. Take a look at what comes before this story at the end of Chapter 4 verse 43
And one assumes the he teaches them about the good news of the kingdom of God. Take a look at what comes before this story at the end of Chapter 4 verse 43
Luke 4:43 TNIV
But he said, “I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns also, because that is why I was sent.”
Good news about the rule of God. That in Jesus God’s kingdom, his rule is made present on earth. And perhaps in part to demonstrate his kingly rule he performs a miracle to show his kingship over creation.
Then...

Jesus does a miracle

Luke 5:4–6 TNIV
When he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into deep water, and let down the nets for a catch.” Simon answered, “Master, we’ve worked hard all night and haven’t caught anything. But because you say so, I will let down the nets.” When they had done so, they caught such a large number of fish that their nets began to break.
Luke 5:4-
And notice
Faith in Jesus’ word, before miracle occurs. Simon (better known to us as Peter) has to do what Jesus says before he has any evidence. Faith comes first. We talked a bit about that last week. That miracles will be explained away unless we come to God with eyes of faith first.
But notice also that Peter doesn’t agree with Jesus. Jesus is a good teacher, and probably a pretty good carpenter… Peter is neither of those things but he is a fisherman and he knows how to fish. And Jesus’ instruction to chuck the nets out at this time of day this close to shore is a big fishing mistake.
But nonetheless he does obey Jesus. And the miracle of the large catch of fish is not luck, it happened because Jesus is King of the world and can command even the fish in the sea.
Obedience to Jesus can seem pretty foolish at times. And yet its when we do the completely ridiculous and often to the worlds eyes foolish things in obedience to God’s call that we find God work powerfully.

Peter’s response

How does Peter respond to this miracle?
Luke 5:8–10a TNIV
When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at Jesus’ knees and said, “Go away from me, Lord; I am a sinful man!” For he and all his companions were astonished at the catch of fish they had taken, and so were James and John, the sons of Zebedee, Simon’s partners. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Don’t be afraid; from now on you will fish for people.”
Luke 5:8-
We see in this interaction both the holiness of God and the grace of God.
As Peter experiences Jesus’ wonderful teaching, and then obeys him and goes fishing even against his better judgment only to catch the biggest load of fish of his lifetime he realises he’s in the presence of God.
And what does he do?
“Simon Peter represents all disciples. His humility and awareness of his sin do not disqualify him from service; they are the prerequisite for service. Simon’s response recalls the reaction of earlier great servants of God like Isaiah and Jeremiah, who also bowed low in humility when they caught a glimpse of God’s presence. Jesus does not call those who think they can help God do his work. God does not need or want servants who think they are doing God a favour. Jesus calls those who know they need to be humble before his power and presence.”
How awesome is this I get to hang out with God? Let’s grab a beer and do something else cool Jesus!
No… no human being ever thinks that in the presence of God. Rather he is immediately and totally aware of his brokenness. Go away Jesus I’m a sinner.
This is the starting place for faith. It’s a place that can be hard to get to though because we are conditioned to think everyone is good.
Take the outrage this past week with Australian Rugby Player Israel Foluoa. He was asked about sin and he said he believed that people who don’t deal with their sin end up in hell. The only criticism I’d want to make of him is he made it sound like only one group or type of person was ending up in hell. When in fact thats the destination each and everyone of us is heading without intervention by God, and you might not realise it but when you have an encounter with Jesus it becomes plainly obvious as it did for Peter in that fishing boat. We all fall short of Gods’ glory and holiness. As Jesus says no one is good but God alone.
BecauseWe are conditioned to think everyone is good. Take the outrage this past week with Australian Rugby Player Israel Foluoa. He was asked about sin and he said he believed that people who don’t deal with their sin end up in hell. The only criticism I’d want to make of him is he made it sound like only one group or type of person was ending up in hell. When in fact thats the destination each and everyone of us is heading without intervention by God, and you might not realise it but when you have an encounter with Jesus it becomes plainly obvious as it did for Peter in that fishing boat. We all fall short of Gods’ glory and holiness. As Jesus says no one is good but God alone.
But of course the good news is that Jesus doesn’t let Peter, or you and I stay trapped in our sin. He reaches out with grace. He says to Peter, “Don’t be afraid.
We are right to fall out our knees in the presence of a holy God, and yet God in his grace lifts us up and sends us out. We stand not in our own strength. But in the strength and grace of God!
Darrell Bock
“Simon Peter represents all disciples. His humility and awareness of his sin do not disqualify him from service; they are the prerequisite for service. Simon’s response recalls the reaction of earlier great servants of God like Isaiah and Jeremiah, who also bowed low in humility when they caught a glimpse of God’s presence. Jesus does not call those who think they can help God do his work. God does not need or want servants who think they are doing God a favour. Jesus calls those who know they need to be humble before his power and presence.”
And so Jesus commissions Peter, the humble and obedient servant, and the other disciples for their new fishing task:

Peter’s commission

Luke 5:10b–11 TNIV
and so were James and John, the sons of Zebedee, Simon’s partners. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Don’t be afraid; from now on you will fish for people.” So they pulled their boats up on shore, left everything and followed him.
As Jesus shows them grace, and calls them to be fellow fishers for people, the disciples are so captivated by this they literally just get up and go. They leave everything there on the shore and start following Jesus.
When you respond in faith to the call of Jesus on your life, it’s not something you simply add on. Great well thanks for saving me from my sin Jesus, I think you’ll be a great addition to my wonderful life.
No the response of a saved sinner to the grace of God in not only rescuing us but giving us a mission, is to leave behind the old life and get on with the new one.

Leaving everything to follow Jesus

When we make the promises of baptism they are the promises of a saved sinner. The promises of someone who is leaving old life of sin on the beach and walking forward in new life with Jesus.
As I’ve been reflecting on this passage I’ve been asking myself, are the parts of my life where I’m still hanging on to the old boat? So let me ask the same questions I’ve been asking myself:
Is there persistent sin that you need to simply leave behind?
Is there an area of your life that upon reflection ought to have been left behind but hasn’t been?
Do you long to go back to the fishing boats? It’s comfortable there, you know how it works.
How do those of us who are parents model this kind of life to our children? Is there some sort of family ritual or routine you can develop that will help your children grow up knowing that following Jesus comes first. That he’s not simply an addition to you living out the Australian Dream, but rather he’s the centre of your families universe? Even me as a minister and parent finds that hard.
As we reflect on this, know this, God’s grace meets us daily. He constantly lifts us out of our mess and empowers us to be grace filled fishers of people, that is disciple making disciples.
“Simon Peter represents all disciples. His humility and awareness of his sin do not disqualify him from service; they are the prerequisite for service. Simon’s response recalls the reaction of earlier great servants of God like Isaiah and Jeremiah, who also bowed low in humility when they caught a glimpse of God’s presence. Jesus does not call those who think they can help God do his work. God odes not need or want servants who think they are doing God a favour. Jesus calls those who know they need to be humble before his power and presence.”
A genuine meeting with Jesus alters one’s perspective.
Related Media
Related Sermons