Faithlife Sermons

Aftermath

Easter 2018  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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Notes & Transcripts

Intro

I have to say that in the last two weeks we have had two very powerful Sundays. Two weeks ago we celebrated Palm Sunday by baptizing eight people; then last Sunday there was no doubt that Jesus was walking in our midst as we celebrated Easter and shared The Lord’s Supper together. So I am wondering and anxiously anticipating just what the Lord is going to do in our midst today.
The title of the message today is “Aftermath” because anytime something powerful happens, positive or negative, there is aftermath. According to the book of Acts the aftermath of the resurrection brought tremendous change and transformation for the 12 apostles and the disciples who had remained faithful to the Lord. As a result they experienced things they had never imagined. People were being healed and miraculous events were happening at a torrent pace. The church was launched on the day of Pentecost and 3000 people were saved and everyday more and more people were giving their lives to the Lord and becoming followers of Jesus.
In the aftermath of these events, the religious leaders and Pharisees set out to put an end to this “movement” by arresting the apostles and putting them in prison. summarizes the aftermath of the resurrection this way:
Acts 5:12–14 ESV
Now many signs and wonders were regularly done among the people by the hands of the apostles. And they were all together in Solomon’s Portico. None of the rest dared join them, but the people held them in high esteem. And more than ever believers were added to the Lord, multitudes of both men and women,
a
Gamaliel, was a famous rabbi and Pharisee and he said
2000 year later we are still celebrating the aftermath the apostles and early disciples experienced in the days weeks after the resurrection. So this morning let me ask, what will future generations of the Wolf Pond Community say about the aftermath of these days in the life of our church.
So this morning let me ask,
So this morning let me ask,
Gamaliel was a very well respected Pharisee and teacher of the Law who gave his brother Pharisees and members of the Sanhedrin some advice concerning the Apostles and the aftermath of the resurrection they were experiencing that I think we should consider today.
Acts 5:38–39 ESV
So in the present case I tell you, keep away from these men and let them alone, for if this plan or this undertaking is of man, it will fail; but if it is of God, you will not be able to overthrow them. You might even be found opposing God!” So they took his advice,
acts 5:38-39
There are some keys to the aftermath that the apostles and early disciples experienced in the wake of the resurrection that we need to understand this morning from . Following these keys will ensure we continue to experience the transformational aftermath of the resurrection and the power of the Lord in our lives as individual disciples and as a church if we will commit to follow His plan and His principles.
The first key is intercession and it is one that had to be fresh on the minds of the apostles.

The Intercession

The Intercession

I believe the experience the apostles shared with the Lord in Gethsemane the night He was betrayed when He implored them to pray and they did not stuck with them. From then on, one of the keys we notice is the apostles and early disciples devotion to prayer.

What they were praying for

For His Power

For His Purpose

The Investment

In the Church

In the Community

The Inversion

The Oxford Dictionary defines inversion as "the action of inverting or the state of being inverted” and invert as to “put upside down or in the opposite position, order, or arrangement.”
inversion
verb /ɪnˈvəːt/
noun
vert as to “put upside down or in the opposite position, order, or arrangement.”
1 the action of inverting or the state of being inverted.
1 put upside down or in the opposite position, order, or arrangement.
vert as to “put upside down or in the opposite position, order, or arrangement.”
Catherine Soanes and Angus Stevenson, eds., Concise Oxford English Dictionary (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).invert as to “put upside down or in the opposite position, order, or arrangement.”

Of their Priorities

Conclusion

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