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9 "because we know that Christ, having been raised from the dead, will not die again. Death no longer rules over him. 10 "For the death he died, he died to sin once for all time; but the life he lives, he lives to God.” ()
v9“because we know that Christ, having been raised from the dead, will not die again...”
Our belief that we will live with Christ is not baseless: it rests upon our knowledge of his resurrection life.
v9 “...Death no longer rules over him.”
For Christ death is over and done with: death no longer has mastery over him.
Death is powerful, and it reigned, for example, from Adam to Moses (5:14).
But now it is defeated. Christ is supreme.
The way Paul puts it (no longer) implies that death once did have dominion over him.
As Christ trod the lowly path of suffering on behalf of doomed sinners he submitted to the rule of death.
But that is all past.
There is no more death for him.
The resurrection was something very different from the raising of Lazarus.
That was an astounding miracle, but it did not deliver Lazarus permanently from death.
In due course he would die. But Jesus rose triumphant and entered into glory.
Then in v10 you have these two phrases, “For the death He died...” and at the end, “…but the life He lives...”
His death with all that it means had to do with sin, and His life with all that it means has to do with God.
The context makes clear that Christ died for our sins; He had none of His own to which he might die.
The context makes clear that Christ died for our sins; he had none of his own to which he might die. But dealing with our sins meant coming into this world of sin and then dying the death that put sin away. That death was a death “to sin”, for it meant the end of Christ’s being in the realm of sin. It was a death to his whole relationship to sin.
But dealing with our sins meant coming into this world of sin and then dying the death that put sin away.
That death was a death “to sin”, for it meant the end of Christ’s being in the realm of sin.
It was a death to his whole relationship to sin.
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3 "The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact expression of his nature, sustaining all things by his powerful word. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high.” ()
v3 “The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact expression of his nature, sustaining all things by his powerful word.”
These two phrases provide the grounds for asserting that the Son is uniquely qualified to be the revealer of God and the mediator of the new covenant.
“After making purification for sins...”
The Son who was the agent of God’s creative activity is the one who has also effected his saving work.
he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high.
The two declarations,
that the Son has made purification for His people’s sins and
been enthroned in the place of honor,
end up forming the whole argument for the letter which revolved around the idea of
the Son who has become the perfect High Priest by His death and exaltation.

New Era...

What Christ inaugurated (launched, set in motion, ushered in) by His resurrection He continues by His exaltation at the right hand of God (; ).
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25 "Therefore, he is able to save completely those who come to God through him, since he always lives to intercede for them.” ()
The conclusion drawn from the fact that the resurrected and ascended Jesus lives forever and has a permanent priesthood is that He is able to save His people completely or forever.
The context emphasizes the eternity of the new priest (v. 24, Jesus lives forever, and His priesthood is permanent)
in contrast to the Levitical priests who were prevented by death from continuing in office.
If Christ saves forever, this is precisely because his salvation is complete.
It implies deliverance from the alternative, which is the judgment of God (2:1–4; 9:27–28; 10:26–31).
O’Brien, P. T. (2010). The Letter to the Hebrews (p. 274). Grand Rapids, MI; Nottingham, England: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
16 "who did not become a priest based on a legal regulation about physical descent [it points first to the bodily descent of priests from the tribe of Levi]
Morris, L. (1988). The Epistle to the Romans (p. 255). Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: W.B. Eerdmans; Inter-Varsity Press.
but based on the power of an indestructible life.” ()
Christ’s becoming ‘a different priest’ is based, not on law but on God’s power, which consists in an indestructible life.
The ‘life’ mentioned in this context was most clearly manifested in the act of Christ’s sacrifice ‘through the eternal Spirit’ (9:14) and His subsequent exaltation.
O’Brien, P. T. (2010). The Letter to the Hebrews (p. 263). Grand Rapids, MI; Nottingham, England: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. but based on the power of an indestructible life.” ()
In His earthly life Christ did face death; but he came back to life through resurrection and, after being ‘exalted above the heavens’ (7:26),
He is now seated ‘at the right hand of the throne of Majesty in heaven’ (8:1).
O’Brien, P. T. (2010). The Letter to the Hebrews (p. 263). Grand Rapids, MI; Nottingham, England: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
So we interpret the “power of an indestructible life” as especially descriptive of Christ as Son and High Priest in His ascended and eternal state.
It is in his heavenly exaltation that Christ exercises that perpetual priesthood.
10 "For if, while we were enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, then how much more, having been reconciled, will we be saved by his life.” ()
If he ever lives to make intercession for us (), it is because of his ‘indestructible life’ (), which is resurrection life ().
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), it is because of his ‘indestructible life’ (
Please turn over to .

Defense...

The NT makes an apologetic use of the resurrection. ; . maintain that God vindicated His Son by delivering him from the hands of his murderers (cf. ; ).
), which is resurrection life (
The same event verifies the future judgment of the world in righteousness ().
), which is resurrection life (
(let’s start reading in vv26-41).
This message of salvation refers back to v. 23, where Jesus is described as the God-appointed ‘Savior’ for Israel.
This message of salvation refers back to v. 23, where Jesus is described as the God-appointed ‘Saviour’ for Israel. Unfortunately, TNIV does not translate the Greek connective gar (‘for’, v. 27), which indicates that what follows is the beginning of the explanation of that salvation. As he tells the story of what happened in Jerusalem, Paul prepares for the warning against unbelief that will climax his sermon (vv. 40–41).
(v. 27), indicates that what follows is the beginning of the explanation of that salvation.
As he tells the story of what happened in Jerusalem, Paul prepares for the warning against unbelief that will climax his sermon (vv. 40–41).
29 "When they had carried out all that had been written about him, they took him down from the tree and put him in a tomb. 30 "But God raised him from the dead,” ()
).
After the finality of burial came the supernatural vindication of Jesus by way of physical resurrection (‘God raised him from the dead’) and
a series of appearances (‘and he appeared for many days to those who came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem’; cf. 1:1–8).
The action of God is set against the action of the people of Jerusalem and their rulers.
Peterson, D. G. (2009). The Acts of the Apostles (p. 391). Grand Rapids, MI; Nottingham, England: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
The particular importance of the apostolic group as witnesses to the people of Israel (‘who are now His witnesses to the people’)
Christian Standard Bible. (2017). (). Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers.’; cf. 1:1–8). The action of God is set against the action of the people of Jerusalem and their rulers. The particular importance of the apostolic group as witnesses to the people of Israel (pros ton laon, ‘to the people’) is then highlighted (cf. 1:21–22; 10:39–42). ‘Those who had travelled with him from Galilee to Jerusalem’ knew Jesus and his teaching in a way which enabled them to understand the significance of what they experienced and to interpret this appropriately.
is then highlighted (cf. 1:21–22; 10:39–42).
‘those who came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem’
knew Jesus and His teaching in a way which enabled them to understand the significance of what they experienced and to interpret this appropriately.
Thus defenders of the faith!
).
flip to 31 "because he has set a day when he is going to judge the world in righteousness by the man he has appointed. He has provided proof of this to everyone by raising him from the dead.”” ()
In this sermon,
Positively, Paul has argued that human beings were created to seek God and have a genuine relationship with him as their creator (vv. 27–28).
Negatively, he has shown that their beliefs and practices have kept them from a true knowledge of God. Now he makes it clear that they must be judged for this.
God has set a day when He is going to judge the world in righteousness (justice).
(; ; 98:9)
This is a description of the activity of God which finds ultimate expression on the last ‘day’ of human history.
The same event verifies the future judgment of the world in righteousness ().
But the gospel proclaims that God will accomplish this by the man He has appointed.
This gives an extraordinary role to Jesus of Nazareth.
God has set the day (cf. ; ; , ; ; , ; , ; ; ), and appointed the judge (cf. 10:42, ‘the one whom God appointed as judge of the living and the dead’; , ‘the day of Christ Jesus’).
The same event verifies the future judgment of the world in righteousness ().
1 "I solemnly charge you before God and Christ Jesus, who is going to judge the living and the dead, and because of his appearing and his kingdom: 2 "Preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; rebuke, correct, and encourage with great patience and teaching.” ()
The same event verifies the future judgment of the world in righteousness ().
The same event verifies the future judgment of the world in righteousness ().
.
1 "Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called as an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God—
The sources of Paul’s message is God.
2 "which he promised beforehand through his prophets in the Holy Scriptures—
An important focus of Romans is the connection between the OT (especially its promises) and the gospel of Christ (3:21; 9:4–6; 11:28; 15:8–12).
This verse and 16:26—“made known through the prophetic writings”—bracket the letter as a whole.
26 "but now revealed and made known through the prophetic Scriptures, according to the command of the eternal God to advance the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles—” ()
Moo, D. J. (2015). The Letters and Revelation. In D. A. Carson (Ed.), NIV Zondervan Study Bible: Built on the Truth of Scripture and Centered on the Gospel Message (p. 2291). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.
3 "concerning his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord, who was a descendant of David according to the flesh
Paul presents the leading figure of the gospel. Jesus Christ, always the Son of God,
became a man as the seed of David and so was and continues to be God and man in two distinct natures, yet one person forever.
seed of David. Alludes to Jesus’ fulfilling the OT expectation of a “son of David,” a king or Messiah, who would liberate and rule God’s people (e.g., ; ).
Beeke, J. R., Barrett, M. P. V., & Bilkes, G. M. (Eds.). (2014). The Reformation Heritage KJV Study Bible (p. 1614). Grand Rapids, MI: Reformation Heritage Books.
4 "and was appointed to be the powerful Son of God according to the Spirit of holiness by the resurrection of the dead.
Moo, D. J. (2015). The Letters and Revelation. In D. A. Carson (Ed.), NIV Zondervan Study Bible: Built on the Truth of Scripture and Centered on the Gospel Message (p. 2291). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.4 "and was appointed to be the powerful Son of God according to the Spirit of holiness by the resurrection of the dead.
4 "and was appointed to be the powerful Son of God according to the Spirit of holiness by the resurrection of the dead.
O’Brien, P. T. (2010). The Letter to the Hebrews (pp. 273–274). Grand Rapids, MI; Nottingham, England: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high.
Morris, L. (1988). The Epistle to the Romans (p. 255). Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: W.B. Eerdmans; Inter-Varsity Press.
Morris, L. (1988). The Epistle to the Romans (pp. 254–255). Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: W.B. Eerdmans; Inter-Varsity Press.
Jesus is eternally God’s Son, but his resurrection from the dead enabled him to enter a new phase of existence in which his work on the cross empowers him to save all who believe (see v. 16).
This is the sense that he who was Son of God in weakness and lowliness during his earthly life
“Through the resurrection … became the Son of God in power”
It says, “according to the Spirit of holiness”
The power of the Holy Spirit of God as shown in the resurrection and the appointment or designation of Christ as the powerful Son of God.
Christian Standard Bible. (2017). (). Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers.”
This also ripples over into (cf ), in that the sending of the Holy Spirit by the exalted Jesus is evidence that the Son has truly been exalted in power.
Not “powerfully appointed (declared)” but appointed to be the “powerful Son of God,” having all power in heaven and on earth ().
All His claims were vindicated by the resurrection.
5 "Through him we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith for the sake of his name among all the Gentiles,” ()
It’s through Christ that our graces flow! Not human achievements but divine gifts.
Obedience follows from the truth Paul expressed in his opening line when he described himself as a “slave” of Christ.
Believers belong to Christ without reserve.
Therefore they owe him the most complete obedience. It is not without interest that this epistle,
which puts such stress on the free salvation won for us by Christ’s atoning act,
should also stress the importance of obedient response.
Whichever way we take the expression, obedience is not an option (cf. ).
It is binding on all Christians.
“Faith’s obedience” is a reminder that, as Paul understood it, faith is not an easy out for those who find a strict morality irksome.
When anyone is saved through faith, it is with a view to obedience.
Morris, L. (1988). The Epistle to the Romans (p. 50). Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: W.B. Eerdmans; Inter-Varsity Press.
The life is given in service to the Lord in whom one has come to believe.
Paul clearly valued obedience.
He was not free to innovate where God had made His will known.
Morris, L. (1988). The Epistle to the Romans (p. 49). Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: W.B. Eerdmans; Inter-Varsity Press.
Beeke, J. R., Barrett, M. P. V., & Bilkes, G. M. (Eds.). (2014). The Reformation Heritage KJV Study Bible (p. 1614). Grand Rapids, MI: Reformation Heritage Books.
Morris, L. (1988). The Epistle to the Romans (p. 46). Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: W.B. Eerdmans; Inter-Varsity Press.
Morris, L. (1988). The Epistle to the Romans (p. 44). Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: W.B. Eerdmans; Inter-Varsity Press.

Jesus is eternally God’s Son, but his resurrection from the dead enabled him to enter a new phase of existence in which his work on the cross empowers him to save all who believe (see v. 16).

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