Faithlife Sermons

Jesus My Hero

Life of Christ  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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Why Did God Allow Jesus To Be Crucified and Die

Notes & Transcripts

Introduction:

One of the things I have heard
I have heard Pastors challenge people during Bible studies and sermons with the question would you be willing to die for what you believe? I have asked the question myself.
That is an unimaginable question to ask isn’t it.
February 14th, 2018, Aaron Feis a football coach at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School ran towards a shooting. Aaron placed himself between a gunman and students acting as a human shield with his lineman size body, saving numerous students from their attacker, and friends and students weren’t surprised that he did it.
Aaron Feis graduated from Douglas High himself in 1999, he was recruited by Jeff Dellenbach a former Miami Dolphin to coach football at other High Schools but he always resisted the offers.
Dellenbach told The Palm Beach Post that Feis was a Douglas guy and he couldn’t be lured away, he did everything for the kids at that school, he was loyal. Feis died later the day of shooting in surgery.
The Douglas Eagles football team posted on Twitter “He died a hero and he will forever be in our hearts and memories”.
Seems like a simple question, and more often than not people will say yes.
Aaron Feis made a conscientious decision to selflessly put himself in front of a murders gun to save the lives of his students. He set their lives ahead of his life. He chose the risk of death so others could live. His actions actually rise to an almost superhuman quality. His actions push the edge of our human thoughts, in a me me self motivated world, the expectation of such a heroic action is unfathomable.
February 14th, 2018
Aaron Feis, the football coach who ran toward the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High, was a “Douglas guy.”A 1999 graduate of the school, security guard and assistant football coach, he resisted offers from former Miami Dolphins lineman Jeff Dellenbach to lure him to coach at other high schools.
“I could never take him away,” Dellenbach told The Palm Beach Post on Thursday. “He was a Douglas guy, and did everything for the kids there.”
“I could never take him away,” Dellenbach told The Palm Beach Post on Thursday. “He was a Douglas guy, and did everything for the kids there.”
Friends and students were not surprised to hear stories of Feis’ heroics in the face of gunfire, shielding students with his lineman-sized body from an attacker who killed 17.
Feis died in surgery late Wednesday.“He selflessly shielded students from the shooter when he was shot,” the Douglas Eagles football team posted on Twitter. “He died a hero and he will forever be in our hearts and memories.”
Aaron Feis was one of two teachers that took that action that day, they lost their lives so that others could live. The other was Scott Beigel. There is not a doubt in anyone's mind that these two men are hero’s and they died in the ultimate sacrifice of love and selflessness, to save a child. These men didn’t put themselves into this situation, they were put in it the moment that gunman walked through the schools door. They didn’t knock on deaths door it came looking for them and they heroically responded in a Godly fashion.
It says in:
John 15:13 NKJV
13 Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.
Now imagine placing yourself purposely into a situation that will ultimately result in your death, but that death is for a purpose. The ultimate sacrifice to save lives not in one school, but throughout the whole world, not in a moment but forever. That’s exactly what Jesus did. He saved my life, He is my hero. Most people probably don’t look at Jesus as a hero, but think about it, what better hero is there to worship.
No Question:
People automatically called Aaron Feis and Scott Beigel hero’s even if they couldn’t personally understand their actions, they didn’t question why they did it or why no one stopped them, they are hero’s and they did what they had to do to preserve life.
Yet a lot of unbelievers and even maybe some that do believe question how a loving God could allow His Son to be crucified and die.
John 1:1–5 NKJV
1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made. 4 In Him was life, and the life was the light of men. 5 And the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.
Romans 9:20 NKJV
But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed say to him who formed it, “Why have you made me like this?”
1 Corinthians 1:18–20 NKJV
For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written: “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, And bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent.” Where is the wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the disputer of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?
1 Cor
John 3:16 NKJV
For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
1 John 3:16 NKJV
By this we know love, because He laid down His life for us. And we also ought to lay down our lives for the brethren.

Ending:

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“I could never take him away,” Dellenbach told The Palm Beach Post on Thursday. “He was a Douglas guy, and did everything for the kids there.”
Friends and students were not surprised to hear stories of Feis’ heroics in the face of gunfire, shielding students with his lineman-sized body from an attacker who killed 17.
Feis died in surgery late Wednesday.“He selflessly shielded students from the shooter when he was shot,” the Douglas Eagles football team posted on Twitter. “He died a hero and he will forever be in our hearts and memories.”
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