Faithlife Sermons

Easter Sunday - 1 Corinthians 15

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 20 views
Notes
Transcript
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →
We are thrilled to be celebrating Easter Sunday here at Eglise Connexion. Easter is typically the day when preachers will preach out their easiest sermons. They’ll pick one verse or two, and talk about those verses for twenty minutes and leave everyone feeling good.
Easter is typically the day when preachers will preach out their easiest sermons. They’ll pick one verse or two, and talk about those verses for twenty minutes and leave everyone feeling good.
I’m not going to do that this morning. If you’re here for the first time, and you’re not a Christian, I’m very happy you’re here…but I’m not going to let you off easy. We’re going to work our way through chapter 15 of Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians—the whole thing. All fifty-eight verses.
We’re going to do something rather difficult today, if you’re up to the challenge. We’re going to work our way through chapter 15 of Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians—the whole thing. All fifty-eight verses. There’s a lot to see here, and we won’t be able to cover it all. But in this one chapter, we have an entire overview of what the Bible says about the resurrection of Jesus and what it means for us as Christians.
And we’re doing it because in this one chapter, we have an entire overview of what the Bible says about the resurrection of Jesus and what it means for us as Christians. So in addition to reading all 58 verses of this passage of Scripture, we’re going to see some of the most theologically dense material in the whole Bible.
But I’m not doing it to torture you. My prayer is that for those of us who are Christians, we will leave this chapter simply refreshed and energized and encouraged by spending some time thinking of what Christ did; and for those here who aren’t Christians, my prayer is that what you might hear, as hard as it is to believe, might make you want this.
Let’s turn to 1 Corinthians chapter 15.

Context

Before we start reading, a bit of context, and a bit of warning.
First, the warning. It would be tempting for us to take this passage—which does indeed say a good deal about us—and make it about us. This passage isn’t ultimately about us, but about God, as we’ll see.
Secondly, the context. Paul is writing to this church in Corinth which has gone seriously off the rails—in their Christian lives, in their struggle with sin, in the things that they believed… This was a church on life support. So Paul is writing to help correct certain errors; to call the church out on many of their incoherent behaviors; and hopefully, to set them back on the path the gospel would have them on.
This chapter addresses one particular error that some Corinthian Christians had fallen into. Some of them believed that although Christ was raised from the dead, Christians would not be. They believed that resurrection exists, but only for Jesus. Now, they of course knew that Jesus had raised some people from the dead, like Lazarus, during his ministry. But Lazarus, at some point, died again—he didn’t live forever. And their understanding was that once we’re dead, we’re dead. Our spirits may live on, but they would live on in a non-physical form.
What’s interesting is that many Christians still believe this today. Our concept of what will happen to us after we die, and after Christ returns, is very fuzzy. A huge number of Christians (as much as one-fourth, according to polls) don’t believe we’ll have bodies in heaven.
I’d suggest that this misunderstanding owes more to Tom and Jerry cartoons—in which Tom and Jerry die and become floating spirits sitting on clouds and playing the harp—than to what the Bible actually says.
According to a Time/CNN poll, only 26% of evangelical Christians believe that we will have bodies in heaven. So we’re right on track with these people in the Corinthian church.
That’s the issue Paul will address here, but that’s not where he will start. Let’s begin reading together at verse 1.

Christ’s Resurrection (v. 1-11)

15 Now I would remind you, brothers, of the gospel I preached to you, which you received, in which you stand, and by which you are being saved, if you hold fast to the word I preached to you—unless you believed in vain.
For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep.
(When Paul says “fallen asleep” in this chapter, he means “died”—he’ll use it again.)
Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles. Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. For I am the least of the apostles, unworthy to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. 10 But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain. On the contrary, I worked harder than any of them, though it was not I, but the grace of God that is with me. 11 Whether then it was I or they, so we preach and so you believed.
There are subjects we can disagree on and still be Christians. This is not one of them. This issue is of first importance. Christ died for our sins, as the Scriptures said he would; he was buried, a totally dead man; and he was raised on the third day.
Paul here tells us what the closed-handed issue of all closed-handed issues is—this is the issue which is of first importance. Christ died for our sins, as the Scriptures said he would; he was buried, a totally dead man; and he was raised on the third day.
And he gave evidence of that resurrection afterwards: he appeared to people after his resurrection. Lots of people. If five-hundred people are witnesses to the same event, then chances are, that event took place. Most news stories which run today don’t have as much eye-witness testimony.
The gospels tell us that Jesus appeared to the disciples, and that he was changed after his resurrection, but he was still visibly recognizable as the same person: he still bore the marks of the nails on his hands and feet; he still had the mark of the spear in his side. And he was physical: they could touch him; they could see him; he could eat food.
This is of primary importance. That’s the first thing.
The Resurrection of the Dead
Let’s keep going, v. 12:
12 Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead?
In other words, you Corinthian Christians believe that Jesus was raised from the dead—good for you. But you deny that the other human believers who die will also be raised…and that makes no sense. v. 13:
13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. 15 We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified about God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. 16 For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised.
(Because Christ was dead too.)
If you’re saying there is no resurrection, then there can’t be resurrection for anyone—even Jesus, because Jesus was also a human being.
17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished.
14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. 15 We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified about God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. 16 For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised. 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. 19 If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.
So here’s what Paul’s saying: this question of whether or not we’ll be raised (or whether we’ll just be disembodied spirits) is actually a massively big deal.
Follow his logic.
If you say that the dead will not be physically, bodily raised one day, then you have to say that Christ wasn’t raised either, because if Christ really did become a man, then he was bound by the laws of the physical world like us. Jesus wasn’t a spirit when he walked on this earth; he was a man. He got hungry and tired; he sweat when he was hot; he bled and died.
So if a dead human being cannot be resurrected physically after death, then Jesus can’t either. If such a thing is impossible, it is impossible for all human beings, even for Jesus.
And the result of that way of thinking is tragic, as he says in v. 17:
17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. [Permanently. Forever.] 19 If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.
Why? He’s already told us in v. 17: 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins.
Do you see? He’s correcting another very common misconception (which we actually talked about last week). We often put all the emphasis on Jesus’s death, as if his death were the only thing that mattered. Believers see Jesus’s death as the ultimate thing that Jesus did for us. We are sinners—we are all rebels who have rejected God—and we are separated from God because of our rebellion. And on the cross, Jesus took our sin on himself and was punished for that sin in our place. That is wonderful news.
Believers see Jesus’s death as the ultimate thing that Jesus did for us.
But here’s the thing: without the resurrection, his death means nothing. Without the resurrection, Jesus was just another man, like all the others. He’s now a pile of dust in a Jerusalem tomb.
Which means that everything we believe is meaningless: we are still under God’s wrath for our sins, and we still have no hope.
Thank God that is not what happened! V. 20 :
20 But in fact Christ HAS been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. 21 For as by a man came death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead. 22 For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive.
We remember the story—Adam, the first man, rebelled against God and sinned. And when he sinned, his sin infected all of humanity. That’s how “by a man came death.”
So when God set in motion his plan to defeat sin and death, that defeat also came through “a man,” Jesus. Through man came death, and through a man comes eternal life. And Jesus is the first man to actually go through that process of dying and being raised to eternal life—that’s why Paul calls him “the firstfruits”.
And what are the firstfruits, in a vineyard or a garden? They are indicators of the fruit which will come after.
23 But each in his own order: Christ the firstfruits, then at his coming those who belong to Christ.
In other words, what happened to Christ will happen to those who belong to Christ. V. 24:
24 Then comes the end, when he delivers the kingdom to God the Father after destroying every rule and every authority and power. 25 For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet. 26 The last enemy to be destroyed is death. 27 For “God has put all things in subjection under his feet.” But when it says, “all things are put in subjection,” it is plain that he is excepted who put all things in subjection under him. 28 When all things are subjected to him, then the Son himself will also be subjected to him who put all things in subjection under him, that God may be all in all.
In this passage Paul is trying to do two things: he’s trying to explain why rejecting the idea that we will be raised is so monumentally dangerous—because if we won’t be raised, then Christ wasn’t either, which means our faith is meaningless… And if our faith is meaningless, then you’d be much better off doing something else.
Christ’s followers at this time were not just embarrassed by their faith, like we are today. They were killed for it. It was a dangerous thing to be a Christian (as it still is in many parts of the world today). But if we won’t be raised, then Christ wasn’t raised…so what’s the point? V. 29:
29 Otherwise, what do people mean by being baptized on behalf of the dead? If the dead are not raised at all, why are people baptized on their behalf? 30 Why are we in danger every hour? 31 I protest, brothers, by my pride in you, which I have in Christ Jesus our Lord, I die every day! 32 What do I gain if, humanly speaking, I fought with beasts at Ephesus? If the dead are not raised, “Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.” 33 Do not be deceived: “Bad company ruins good morals.” 34 Wake up from your drunken stupor, as is right, and do not go on sinning. For some have no knowledge of God. I say this to your shame.
So let’s sum up what he’s said so far. In this passage Paul is trying to do two things: firstly, he’s trying to explain why rejecting the idea that we will be physically raised from the dead is so monumentally dangerous. Why it’s dangerous to think we’ll just be disembodied spirits for all eternity.
And he’s working backwards to get there. Usually we begin with Christ and work our way down to us. In his logic, he starts with us and works his way up to Christ. He’s saying, if we won’t be raised—physically, bodily raised from the dead—then Christ wasn’t raised either, which means our faith is meaningless… And if our faith is meaningless, then you’d be much better off doing something else.
Christ’s followers at this time were not just embarrassed by their faith, like we are today. They were killed for it. It was a dangerous thing to be a Christian (as it still is in many parts of the world today). But if we won’t be raised, then Christ wasn’t raised…so what’s the point?
And then he works back to where he began, saying, “But Christ was raised! So our faith is not in vain! We’re not suffering for nothing! If Christ was raised, then he will be ultimately victorious! He prove that he has defeated sin and death! Because he was raised, we will be raised too!”
And that’s his first point: Christ’s resurrection assures our resurrection.
Now here’s where it gets really good for us. Here’s where God takes this glorious work he has done and gives us the icing on the cake—slathers it on, in big thick layers.
But God, in his grace, doesn’t only talk about himself. He could very well say, “These things are true, so worship me...” and stop right there. But he doesn’t. He says, “These things are true, so worship me… And I’ll put some icing on the cake: these things are true, so here’s what that means for YOU.
V. 35:
35 But someone will ask, “How are the dead raised? With what kind of body do they come?”
THAT’S the question people would ask today. Those who imagine us in heaven floating on clouds in disembodied-spirit-form would hear all these things and say (very skeptically), “Okay. I’ll play along. You say we’ll be raised? Well then what will our bodies look like? Because an awful lot of Christians will have died before Christ comes back, and they’ll be dust. Some of them will have even been cremated, and be ashes. Our bodies fall apart. So if we’re raised, what will our bodies be like? Huh? Tell me that.
And I love how Paul, as he does elsewhere, answers them like he’s answering a pretentious child—and he does it by using the image of seeds which grow into plants. Seeds are dry; there is no life in them; if they sit on a shelf somewhere, nothing will happen. But if you plant those seeds in the ground, and water them and give them sunlight…suddenly you have something different. V. 36:
36 You foolish person! What you sow does not come to life unless it dies. 37 And what you sow is not the body that is to be, but a bare kernel, perhaps of wheat or of some other grain. 38 But God gives it a body as he has chosen, and to each kind of seed its own body. 39 For not all flesh is the same, but there is one kind for humans, another for animals, another for birds, and another for fish. 40 There are heavenly bodies and earthly bodies, but the glory of the heavenly is of one kind, and the glory of the earthly is of another. 41 There is one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars; for star differs from star in glory.
(“Of course they’re dust! Of course they’re ashes! Plants are the same way.
In other words,
37 And what you sow is not the body that is to be, but a bare kernel, perhaps of wheat or of some other grain. 38 But God gives it a body as he has chosen, and to each kind of seed its own body. 39 For not all flesh is the same, but there is one kind for humans, another for animals, another for birds, and another for fish. 40 There are heavenly bodies and earthly bodies, but the glory of the heavenly is of one kind, and the glory of the earthly is of another. 41 There is one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars; for star differs from star in glory.
42 So is it with the resurrection of the dead. What is sown is perishable; what is raised is imperishable. 43 It is sown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it is raised in power. 44 It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body. 45 Thus it is written, “The first man Adam became a living being”; the last Adam became a life-giving spirit. 46 But it is not the spiritual that is first but the natural, and then the spiritual. 47 The first man was from the earth, a man of dust; the second man is from heaven. 48 As was the man of dust, so also are those who are of the dust, and as is the man of heaven, so also are those who are of heaven. 49 Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven.
I'm going to take a risk when trying to explain this—keep in mind, fundamentalists, that this is just an illustration, to help us see what Paul’s saying.
At his resurrection: he is glorified, and his people see his glory.
Think about evolution. Scientists will say that species evolve over time: they start off one thing, and over long periods of time they adapt to their particular environment and become something else. So what we see now is different from what it was before, but it still contains markers of what came before. Species change, but not entirely: a fish cannot evolve into an iPhone.
Paul’s not saying that we will evolve through some kind of natural process, but rather that after the resurrection, our bodies will indeed be different…but not entirely different. There will be certain characteristics our bodies have now that they will still have after the resurrection!
And our point of reference for knowing what some of those characteristics will be is what we see about Jesus in the gospels (v. 49): Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust [Adam], we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven [Jesus].
After he was raised, Jesus was changed, but he was still physical—he was not a spirit. He was changed, but he was still recognizable—people still knew who he was.
In the same way, our bodies will be changed—they will be made perfect and eternal—but they will still be us. I’ll be able to recognize you if I see you in heaven.
Now this explanation will certainly not satisfy everyone—and that’s why I love Paul’s honesty here. He admits all this is mysterious, and that we don’t have all the details. But here’s what we know for sure (v. 50):
Mystery and Victory
50 I tell you this, brothers: flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, nor does the perishable inherit the imperishable. 51 Behold! I tell you a mystery. We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, 52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed. 53 For this perishable body must put on the imperishable, and this mortal body must put on immortality.
(In other words, this shouldn’t be possible for human beings. God had to come in and do something to make this happen
51 Behold! I tell you a mystery. We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, 52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed. 53 For this perishable body must put on the imperishable, and this mortal body must put on immortality.
In other words, this should not be possible. Perishable beings should not be able to become imperishable. The only way for this to work would be for the imperishable—the divine; God himself—to come into our perishable humanity and give us what we are lacking. The only way for this to work is for God to take us perishable humans and make us imperishable, clothing us in perfect, eternal humanity like a garment.
V. 54:
54 When the perishable puts on the imperishable, and the mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written:
“Death is swallowed up in victory.”
55  “O death, where is your victory?
O death, where is your sting?” 56 The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law.
56 The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law.
It is so ironic that these verses are often read aloud at Christian funerals. “Death, where is your victory? Death, where is your sting?”
It’s right there! In that casket! This person died because of sin, and this person was a sinner because he was born into a world where he was submitted to a law of perfect righteousness that he could not obey. THERE’S the sting of death.
The reason it makes sense to say these things when we can actually see and know that there is a person laying there dead in that box is because we know they won’t stay that way. When Christ returns, he will raise us; and he will raise us in perfect, renewed, imperishable bodies.
57 But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.
Christ, the Son of God, God himself, became a man; he lived a perfect life; he died for our sins; he was raised in a perfect, glorified body; and he gives his victory over sin and death to us. His victory is our victory. His resurrection will be our resurrection. He will raise us, just as he was raised.

Application

Now the question here is, What difference does all of this make? Is Paul just telling this stuff to the Corinthians to make them happy? So that they’ll be comforted knowing that there is more after death than just an ethereal, spiritual existence?
Partially, probably. But not just. He’s telling them all of this in order to drive them to the proper response. And we know this because he begins the last sentence of this chapter (v. 58) with the word “Therefore.”
In other words, given all that we have just seen, knowing that Christ’s resurrection assures our resurrection, knowing that Christ’s victory over death and sin is our victory over death and sin, do not fear death, and obey your Lord.
58 Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain.
The Christian life is a hard life. It’s harder in some places than in others. Some Christians today are being killed for their faith. Most Parisian Christians won’t have to die for their faith, but they’ll probably face ridicule; they’ll face losing friends or family; they may even face losing job opportunities.
Whatever difficulties your Christian life brings you, however, keep going. Be steadfast. Be immovable. Continue to obey your Lord. Kill your sin. Share the gospel. Do the work of the Lord, whatever work he gives you to do this day.
And do it because you know that your labor is not in vain.
Whatever pain you’re enduring today because of your faith is nothing compared to what you’ll gain from your faith when Christ returns.
You look at yourself in the mirror and don’t like what you see. You have a better picture in your mind of what you could look like. So you go to the gym. You get on the machine. You lift the weights. You feel that burning in your muscles which (frankly) feels horrible. But you do it because you know that it will work: if you keep at it, the things you want to see on your body will begin to show up.
We are suffering today. But we persevere. We remain steadfast. We remain immovable. That suffering in obedience is just our muscles burning; it is just a reminder that we are going somewhere. That one day we will be with him. That one day we will be like him.
Jesus lived for us, he died for us, and he was raised for us. And he did all of that so that we might be raised with him—that we might see him, physically, and hear his voice, and touch him and know him. And glorify him, forever.
If you know him, then don’t despair. Look at what is ahead of you and keep going: your labor is not in vain.
If you don’t know him, then don’t imagine for a second that everything I said this morning is just for us. It is for anyone who turns to Christ in faith. Come to him, repent of your sins and trust in him, and believe that our end will be yours.
Today is in many ways the most special day of the year for Christians, because it’s the day in which we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus. The Christian church has celebrated this particular day for centuries. But given what Paul says here, it is an absolute anomaly that we would think of the resurrection more on one day than on any other. The resurrection is the reason we live every day the way we do, and if the resurrection doesn’t fit into every day, then we have barely grasped its significance.
Mary doesn’t recognize him immediately (he’s visibly changed) (v. 14).
He appears in a locked room—normal humans can’t do that (v. 19).
Ressuscité(s)
Now, I gave a warning at the beginning, and I’d like to come back to it as we close. It would be tempting for us to see everything Paul is saying here and to make it all about us. To think of ourselves as future superheroes because we’ll be given resurrected, glorified bodies like Christ. Or even worse: to somehow imagine that because he’s promised us these things, we somehow deserve them.
Pâques 2018
He displays his wounds—it’s not a different body (v. 27).
But this passage is not about us. This passage—from beginning to end, including all the things he says about what will happen to us—is about God. About what he has done. About who he is.
1 Corinthiens 15
God didn’t need to create us. And he didn’t need to save us. He has always been perfectly complete in himself; he has always been perfectly and infinitely happen in the fellowship of the Trinity, and he didn’t need us to fill some kind of hole in his own heart.
Nous sommes heureux de fêter le dimanche de Pâques à l’Église Connexion. Le dimanche de Pâques, les chrétiens célèbrent un événement singulier : la résurrection de Jésus.
And he didn’t send Jesus because (as Loréal claims) we’re “worth it.” This had nothing to do with us. Marshall Segal writes, “God did not write Holy Week into history because he was desperate to have you (), but because loving you, despite how little you deserved his love, would display just how loving he is—how glorious he is.”
Le dimanche de Pâques est généralement le jour où les prédicateurs prêchent leurs sermons les plus faciles et accessibles. Ils choisissent un verset ou deux, ils parlent de ces versets pendant vingt minutes et tout le monde part très content.
God did not write Holy Week into history because he was desperate to have you (), but because loving you, despite how little you deserved his love, would display just how loving he is — how glorious he is
So when you think about heaven, when you think about these wonderful promises, don’t think about them for your own sake. Let the comfort of these promises drive your eyes up to God, and be thankful for the blessing of simply knowing him.
Ce n’est pas ce qu’on va faire ce matin. Si vous êtes là pour la première fois, et vous n’êtes pas chrétien, je suis très, très heureux que vous soyez là…mais je ne vous laisserai pas vous en tirer si facilement. Nous allons faire le tour du chapitre 15 de la première lettre de Paul aux Corinthiens—tout le chapitre. Tous les cinquante-huit versets.
Mais je ne vais pas vous torturer (j’espère). Ma prière, c’est que pour nous qui sommes chrétiens, nous quitterons ce chapitre stimulés et encouragés par ce que Christ a fait ; et pour vous qui n’êtes pas chrétiens, ma prière est que ce que vous entendez, aussi incroyable que cela puisse paraître, vous donne envie d’en savoir plus.
Allons à 1 Corinthiens chapitre 15.
Avant qu’on commence à lire, un peu de contexte.
Paul écrit sa lettre à cette église à Corinthe qui a sérieusement déraillé—dans leurs vies chrétiennes, dans leur lutte avec le péché, dans les choses qu’ils croient… Et ce chapitre adresse un travers particulier dans lequel quelques chrétiens corinthiens étaient tombés.
La Bible dit que nous sommes tous des pécheurs, et que dans son amour Dieu a envoyé son Fils, qui a vécu une vie parfaite, qui est mort pour nos péchés, qui est ressuscité trois jours plus tard, qui est monté au ciel dans son corps, et qui reviendra un jour pour prendre tous ceux qui ont la foi en lui et les amener vivre avec lui pour toujours. Toute la foi chrétienne tourne autour de cette vérité centrale.
Le problème, c’est que ces gens à Corinthe avaient des idées erronées sur comment cette vie éternelle avec Jésus se passerait. Ils croyaient que Jésus est bien ressuscité d’entre les morts, mais ça ne se passerait pas comme ça pour les chrétiens. Ils avaient en tête un peu cette image classique de Tom et Jerry qui meurent et deviennent des esprits qui flottent sur les nuages et qui jouent à la harpe.
Il y a encore beaucoup de chrétiens qui croient cela aujourd’hui. Notre idée de ce qui se passera après notre mort, et après le retour de Christ, est très flou. Un grand nombre de chrétiens (jusqu’à un quart des chrétiens, selon les sondages) ne croient pas qu’on aura des corps physiques au paradis, mais qu’on sera un peu plus comme Tom et Jerry. (Si vous n’aimez pas cette image du paradis, c’est normal—elle est affreuse.)
Alors c’est cette erreur-là que Paul corrige dans ce passage. Mais il profite de l’occasion de nous parler de quelque chose d’encore plus grand.
Lisons ensemble à partir du v. 1 :
15 Je vous rappelle, frères et sœurs, l’Evangile que je vous ai annoncé, que vous avez reçu et dans lequel vous tenez ferme. 2C’est aussi par lui que vous êtes sauvés si vous le retenez dans les termes où je vous l’ai annoncé; autrement, votre foi aurait été inutile.
3Je vous ai transmis avant tout le message que j’avais moi aussi reçu: Christ est mort pour nos péchés, conformément aux Ecritures; 4il a été enseveli et il est ressuscité le troisième jour, conformément aux Ecritures. 5Ensuite il est apparu à Céphas, puis aux douze. 6Après cela, il est apparu à plus de 500 frères et sœurs à la fois, dont la plupart sont encore vivants et dont quelques-uns sont morts. 7Ensuite, il est apparu à Jacques, puis à tous les apôtres. 8Après eux tous, il m’est apparu à moi aussi, comme à un enfant né hors terme. 9En effet, je suis le plus petit des apôtres et je ne mérite même pas d’être appelé apôtre, parce que j’ai persécuté l’Eglise de Dieu. 10Mais par la grâce de Dieu je suis ce que je suis, et sa grâce envers moi n’a pas été sans résultat. Au contraire, j’ai travaillé plus qu’eux tous, non pas moi toutefois, mais la grâce de Dieu [qui est] avec moi. 11Ainsi donc, que ce soit moi ou que ce soient eux, voilà le message que nous prêchons, et voilà aussi ce que vous avez cru.
Il y a des sujets sur lesquels nous pouvons ne pas être d’accord, et quand même être des chrétiens. Ce sujet n’est pas un de ces sujets-là.
Ce sujet est le sujet qui est important par-dessus tout (v. 3). Christ est mort pour nos péchés, conformément aux Ecritures ; il a été enseveli, un homme totalement mort ; et il a été revenu à la vie trois jours plus tard.
En plus, il a donné des évidences de sa résurrection après : il est apparu aux gens après sa résurrection. A beaucoup de gens. Si cinq cents personnes sont témoins d’un même événement, il y a de fortes chances que cet événement ait eu lieu. (Et remarquez bien que Paul encourage les Corinthiens à aller trouver ces personnes qui ont vu Jésus, qui étaient, pour la plupart, encore vivantes à l’époque.)
Ça s’est passé, il dit, et le fait que ça s’est passé est d’une importance capitale.
Continuons, v. 12 :
12 Or, si l’on prêche que Christ est ressuscité, comment quelques-uns parmi vous peuvent-ils dire qu’il n’y a pas de résurrection des morts?
Autrement dit : vous, chrétiens de Corinthe, vous croyez que Jésus est ressuscité—c’est bien. Mais vous ne croyez pas que les autres—les croyants humains qui meurent—seront aussi ressuscité de la même manière…et ça, ça n’a pas de sens. V. 13 :
13S’il n’y a pas de résurrection des morts, Christ non plus n’est pas ressuscité. 14Et si Christ n’est pas ressuscité, alors notre prédication est vide, et votre foi aussi. 15Il se trouve même que nous sommes de faux témoins vis-à-vis de Dieu, puisque nous avons témoigné contre Dieu qu’il a ressuscité Christ. Or il ne l’a pas fait si les morts ne ressuscitent pas. 16En effet, si les morts ne ressuscitent pas, Christ non plus n’est pas ressuscité.
(Parce que Christ est mort aussi.)
OK—un peu de contexte pour comprendre. La Bible dit qu’après sa résurrection, Jésus est monté au ciel dans son corps, et qu’il reviendra un jour pour prendre tous ceux qui ont la foi en lui et les amener vivre avec lui pour toujours.
La question, c’est comment va-t-il faire cela ? Est-ce qu’il va juste prendre nos esprits pour être avec lui ? Non—la Bible nous dit que Jésus ressuscitera tous ceux qui ont la foi en lui : il renouvellera nos corps et fera que nos corps reprennent vie, et c’est dans nos corps que nous passerons l’éternité avec lui.
Alors vous voyez ce qu’il dit : la question de si nous serons ressuscités dans nos corps (ou si nous serons simplement des esprits sans corps) est en fait une question très, très importante. Ce n’est pas une petite chose.
Suivons sa logique.
Si tu dis que les morts ne seront pas physiquement ressuscités, dans leurs corps, alors tu dois aussi dire que Jésus n’a pas été ressuscité, parce que si Jésus est réellement devenu un homme, alors il était soumis aux lois du monde naturel, comme nous.
Du coup, si un être humain ne peut pas ressusciter physiquement après sa mort, alors Jésus non plus. Si une telle chose est impossible, c’est impossible pour tous les êtres humains, y compris Jésus.
Et le résultat de cette manière de penser est tragique, comme il dit au v. 17 :
17 Or, si Christ n’est pas ressuscité, votre foi est inutile, vous êtes encore dans vos péchés, 18et par conséquent ceux qui sont morts en Christ sont aussi perdus. [De manière permanente. Pour toujours.] 19Si c’est pour cette vie seulement que nous espérons en Christ, nous sommes les plus à plaindre de tous les hommes.
Vous voyez ? Les chrétiens ont tendance à placer toute l’emphase sur la mort de Jésus, comme si sa mort était la seule chose qui comptait.
Nous sommes des pécheurs—des rebels, qui ont rejeté Dieu—et nous sommes tous séparés de Dieu à cause de cette rébellion. Et à la croix, Jésus a pris notre péché sur lui-même et s’est fait punir pour ce péché à notre place. C’est vrai, et c’est merveilleux, et on devrait affirmer ça.
Mais voici le truc : sans sa résurrection, sa mort ne veut rien dire. Sans la résurrection, Jésus n’était qu’un homme, comme les autres. Il est maintenant un tas de poussière dans un tombeau à Jérusalem.
Et si c’est vrai que Jésus est toujours mort, alors tout ce qu’on croit n’est que fumée : nous sommes toujours sous la colère de Dieu pour nos péchés, et nous sommes toujours sans espoir.
Merci Seigneur que ce n’est pas ça qui s’est passé. V. 20 :
20 Mais en réalité, Christ EST ressuscité, précédant ainsi ceux qui sont morts. 21En effet, puisque la mort est venue à travers un homme, c’est aussi à travers un homme qu’est venue la résurrection des morts. 22Et comme tous meurent en Adam, de même aussi tous revivront en Christ…
Nous nous souvenons de l’histoire—Adam, le premier homme, s’est rebellé contre Dieu. Et quand il l’a fait, son péché a infecté toute l’humanité qui le suivrait. C’est ainsi que la mort est venue à travers un homme.
Mais Dieu avait un plan avant même d’avoir créer le monde de vaincre le péché et la mort ; et cette victoire est aussi venue à travers « un homme, » Jésus. A travers un homme, la mort est venue ; et à travers un homme la vie éternelle est venue. Jésus est le premier homme qui est passé par ce processus de mourir et de ressusciter à la vie éternelle.
Et quand on dit que quelque chose arrive en « premier, » qu’est-ce qu’on veut dire ? S’il y a un premier, il va y avoir un deuxième. Et un troisième. Et ainsi de suite.
V. 22 :
22Et comme tous meurent en Adam, de même aussi tous revivront en Christ, 23mais chacun à son propre rang: Christ en premier, puis ceux qui appartiennent à Christ lors de son retour.
Autrement dit : ce qui s’est passé à Jésus se passera aussi pour ceux qui appartiennent à Jésus. V. 24 :
24 Ensuite viendra la fin, quand il remettra le royaume à celui qui est Dieu et Père, après avoir anéanti toute domination, toute autorité et toute puissance. 25En effet, il faut qu’il règne jusqu’à ce qu’il ait mis tous ses ennemis sous ses pieds. 26Le dernier ennemi qui sera anéanti, c’est la mort. 27Dieu, en effet, a tout mis sous ses pieds. Mais lorsque Dieu dit que tout lui a été soumis, il est évident que c’est à l’exception de celui qui lui a soumis toute chose. 28Lorsque tout lui aura été soumis, alors le Fils lui-même se soumettra à celui qui lui a soumis toute chose, afin que Dieu soit tout en tous.
29S’il en était autrement, que feraient ceux qui se font baptiser pour les morts? Si les morts ne ressuscitent en aucun cas, pourquoi se font-ils baptiser pour eux? 30Et nous, pourquoi affrontons-nous à toute heure le danger? 31Chaque jour je risque la mort, aussi vrai, frères et sœurs, que vous faites ma fierté en Jésus-Christ notre Seigneur. 32Si c’est dans une perspective purement humaine que j’ai combattu contre les bêtes à Ephèse, quel avantage m’en revient-il? Si les morts ne ressuscitent pas, alors mangeons et buvons, puisque demain nous mourrons.
33Ne vous y trompez pas, «les mauvaises compagnies corrompent les bonnes mœurs. » 34Revenez à votre bon sens, comme il convient, et ne péchez pas; car certains d’entre vous ne connaissent pas Dieu, je le dis à votre honte.
Alors prenons un instant pour souffler. Dans ce passage Paul essaie de faire trois choses : d’abord, il essaie d’expliquer pourquoi cette idée que les chrétiens ne seront que des esprits au paradis, sans corps, est tellement dangereuse.
Il dit : si nous ne serons pas ressuscités—physiquement ressuscités, dans nos corps—alors Jésus ne l’a pas été non plus, ce qui veut dire que notre foi est inutile… Et si notre foi est inutile, il vaut mieux qu’on ne perde plus notre temps à vivre pour lui. Mangeons et buvons, parce que ça ne durera pas.
C’était dangereux d’être chrétien à l’époque (comme c’est encore dangereux aujourd’hui, dans certains endroits du monde) ; les gens mourraient pour leur foi. Mais si nous ne serons pas ressuscités, alors Jésus n’a pas été ressuscité non plus…alors à quoi bon ?
Mais puis il revient là où il a commencé, en disant : « Mais Jésus a été ressuscité ! Alors notre foi n’est pas pour rien ! Nous ne souffrons pas pour rien ! Jésus a prouvé qu’il a vaincu le péché et la mort ! Parce qu’il a été ressuscité, nous serons aussi ressuscités, de la même manière ! »
Et voilà son premier grand point : que la résurrection de Christ assure notre résurrection. Pas une résurrection en esprit seulement. Une résurrection physique. Avec de nouveaux corps, qui peuvent toucher et manger et boire et courir et rire.
Et là, on arrive au moment où ça devient formidable pour nous. C’est ici que Dieu prend cette œuvre glorieuse qu’il a accomplie en Jésus, et nous donne la cerise sur le gâteau. Une cerise gigantesque.
V. 35:
35 Mais quelqu’un dira: «Comment les morts ressuscitent-ils et avec quel corps reviennent-ils?
C’est ÇA, la question que les gens poseraient aujourd’hui. Ceux qui nous imaginent au paradis sur les nuages, des esprits sans corps, entendraient toutes ces choses et diraient : « D’accord : tu dis qu’on aura des corps ? Très bien—à quoi ressembleront ces corps ? Parce qu’il y a beaucoup de chrétiens qui seront morts avant que Jésus revienne, et ils seront de la poussière. Nos corps décomposent. Alors si on sera ressuscités, quels corps aurons-nous ? Hein ? »
C’est malgré tout une bonne question. Alors pour y répondre, Paul se sert de l’image des graines qui sont semées et qui deviennent des plantes. Les graines sont sèches ; il n’y a pas de vie en elle ; si elles restent sur une étagère quelque part, rien ne se passera. Mais si on plante ses graines dans la terre, et les arrose et leur donne de la lumière…dans quelque temps on aura quelque chose de nouveau.
V. 36 :
36Homme dépourvu de bon sens! Ce que tu sèmes ne peut reprendre vie que s’il meurt. 37Et ce que tu sèmes, ce n’est pas la plante qui poussera; c’est une simple graine, un grain de blé peut-être, ou d’une autre semence. 38Puis Dieu lui donne un corps, comme il le veut, et à chaque semence il donne un corps qui lui est propre.
39Les êtres vivants n’ont pas tous la même nature, mais autre est la nature des hommes, autre celle des quadrupèdes, autre celle des oiseaux, autre celle des poissons. 40Il y a aussi des corps célestes et des corps terrestres, mais l’éclat des corps célestes est différent de celui des corps terrestres. 41Autre est l’éclat du soleil, autre l’éclat de la lune, et autre l’éclat des étoiles; chaque étoile diffère même en éclat d’une autre étoile.
42C’est aussi le cas pour la résurrection des morts. Le corps est semé corruptible, il ressuscite incorruptible. 43Il est semé méprisable, il ressuscite glorieux. Il est semé faible, il ressuscite plein de force. 44Il est semé corps naturel, il ressuscite corps spirituel. [S’]il y a un corps naturel, il y a aussi un corps spirituel. 45C’est pourquoi il est écrit: Le premier homme, Adam, devint un être vivant. Le dernier Adam est un esprit qui communique la vie. 46Mais ce n’est pas le spirituel qui vient en premier, c’est le naturel; ce qui est spirituel vient ensuite. 47Le premier homme, tiré de la terre, est fait de poussière, le second homme, [le Seigneur,] est du ciel. 48Tel est l’homme terrestre, tels sont aussi les hommes terrestres; et tel est l’homme céleste, tels seront aussi les hommes célestes. 49Et de même que nous avons porté l’image de l’homme fait de poussière, nous porterons aussi l’image de celui qui est venu du ciel.
Je vais prendre un risque en essayant d’expliquer tout ça—alors vous les fondamentalistes, gardez en tête que c’est juste une illustration, pour nous aider à voir ce que Paul dit.
Pensez à l’évolution. Les scientifiques disent que les espèces évoluent avec le temps ; ils commencent une chose, et après de longues périodes ils s’adaptent à leur environnement particulier et deviennent autre chose. Alors l’espèce qu’on a aujourd’hui est différent de ce qu’il a été, mais il contient quand même des marques de ce qu’il était avant. Certains dinosaures avaient une ossature très similaire à celle des oiseaux aujourd’hui. Les espèces changent, mais pas totalement : un poisson ne peut pas évoluer pour devenir un iPhone.
Paul ne dit pas que nous évoluerons à travers un processus naturel, mais plutôt il donne cette même image : après la résurrection, nous aurons des corps, et ces corps seront différents…mais pas totalement. Ce serons quand même nos corps. Il y aura certaines caractéristiques que nos corps ont aujourd’hui qu’ils auront encore, après la résurrection !
Et notre référence pour savoir quelles seront ces caractéristiques viennent de ce qu’on voit de Jésus dans les évangiles. (V. 49 : de même que nous avons porté l’image de l’homme fait de poussière [Adam], nous porterons aussi l’image de celui qui est venu du ciel [Jésus].)
Après sa résurrection, Jésus était changé. Les gens mettaient un moment avant de le reconnaître. Il faisait des choses—comme apparaître au milieu d’une pièce fermée à clé—qu’il ne faisait pas avant. Il était toujours reconnaissable—les gens pouvaient voir que c’était lui. Il avait encore les marques des clous sur ses mains et ses pieds ; il avait encore la marque de la lance dans son côté. Et surtout, il était physique—on pouvait le touchait, on pouvait le voir ; et il pouvait manger la nourriture que les gens lui donnaient.
De la même manière, nos corps seront aussi changés—ils seront renouvelés, rendus parfaits et éternels—mais nous serons quand même nous-mêmes. On pourra se reconnaître quand on se verra au paradis.
Cette explication ne satisfera certainement pas tout le monde—et c’est pour cela que j’aime l’honnêteté de Paul ici. Il admet que tout cela est mystérieux, et que nous n’avons pas tous les détails. Mais voici ce qu’on sait (v. 50) :
50 “50Ce que je veux dire, frères et sœurs, c’est que notre nature actuelle ne peut pas hériter du royaume de Dieu, et que ce qui est corruptible [=périssable] n’hérite pas non plus de l’incorruptibilité. 51Voici, je vous dis un mystère: nous ne mourrons pas tous, mais tous nous serons transformés, 52en un instant, en un clin d’œil, au son de la dernière trompette. La trompette sonnera, alors les morts ressusciteront incorruptibles et nous, nous serons transformés. 53Il faut en effet que ce corps corruptible revête l’incorruptibilité et que ce corps mortel revête l’immortalité.
Ça ne devrait pas être possible. Les êtres périssables ne devraient pas pouvoir devenir impérissable. La seule manière dont c’est possible, c’est que l’incorruptible—le divin ; Dieu lui-même—descende jusqu’à notre humanité corruptible et nous donne ce qui nous manque—des corps renouvelés, une nouvelle humanité qu’on portera comme un vêtement.
V. 54:
54Lorsque ce corps corruptible aura revêtu l’incorruptibilité et que ce corps mortel aura revêtu l’immortalité, alors s’accomplira cette parole de l’Ecriture: La mort a été engloutie dans la victoire. 55Mort, où est ton aiguillon? Enfer, où est ta victoire? 56L’aiguillon de la mort, c’est le péché; et ce qui donne sa puissance au péché, c’est la loi.
C’est marrant qu’on lit souvent ces versets pendant des funérailles. « Mort, où est ton aiguillon? Enfer, où est ta victoire? »
C’est ! Juste là, dans le cercueil ! Cette personne est morte à cause du péché, et cette personne était pécheresse parce qu’elle était soumise à une loi de justice parfaite qu’elle ne pouvait pas respecter. VOILÀ, l’aiguillon de la mort.
La raison pour laquelle ça a du sens de dire que la mort a perdu son pouvoir, alors qu’il y a une personne morte dans cette boîte devant nous, c’est parce qu’on sait que cette personne, si elle appartient à Jésus, ne restera pas morte. Quand Jésus reviendra, il nous ressuscitera. Il nous ressusciteras dans des corps parfaits, renouvelés et impérissables.
V. 57 :
57Mais que Dieu soit remercié, lui qui nous donne la victoire par notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ!
Jésus-Christ, le Fils de Dieu, Dieu lui-même, est devenu un homme ; il a vécu une vie parfaite ; il est mort pour nos péchés ; il a été ressuscité dans un corps parfait et glorifié ; et il nous DONNE sa victoire sur le péché et sur la mort. Sa victoire, c’est notre victoire. Sa résurrection sera notre résurrection. L’Esprit qui l’a ressuscité, nous ressuscitera aussi.
Alors. Je sais que ça fait beaucoup. Mais il faut qu’on se pose une dernière question : Quelle différence tout cela fait-il ? Est-ce que Paul dit tout ça aux Corinthiens pour les rendre heureux ? Pour qu’ils soient réconfortés en sachant qu’il y a plus après la mort qu’une existence simplement spirituelle ?
En partie, peut-être. Mais pas que. Il leur dit tout cela afin de les pousser à la réponse appropriée. Et on le sait parce qu’il commence la dernière phrase du chapitre (v. 58) avec le mot « Ainsi. »
Autrement dit : Étant donné tout ce qu’on vient de voir, sachant que la résurrection de Jésus assure notre résurrection, et que sa victoire sur la mort et le péché est notre victoire sur la mort et le péché, ne craignez pas la mort, et obéissez à votre Seigneur.
58 Ainsi, mes frères et sœurs bien-aimés, soyez fermes, inébranlables. Travaillez de mieux en mieux à l’œuvre du Seigneur, sachant que votre travail n’est pas sans résultat dans le Seigneur.
La vie chrétienne est une vie dure. Elle est plus dure dans certains endroits que dans d’autres. Certains chrétiens aujourd’hui sont tués pour leur foi. La plupart des chrétiens parisiens n’auront pas à affronter la mort pour leur foi, mais ils auront surement à affronter la ridicule ; la possibilité de perdre des amis ou de la famille ou une opportunité à l’emploi.
Mais quelles que soit les difficultés que ta vie chrétienne t’apporte, continue. Persévère. Sois ferme. Continue d’obéir à ton Seigneur. Tue ton péché. Partage l’évangile. Travaille à l’œuvre du Seigneur, quel que soit le travail qu’il te donne de faire aujourd’hui.
Et fais-le parce que tu sais que ton travail n’est pas en vain. Il n’est pas sans résultat.
La douleur que tu subis aujourd’hui—peu importe ce qu’elle est—n’est rien par rapport à ce que tu gagneras au retour de Jésus.
Nous souffrons aujourd’hui. Mais nous persévérons. Nous restons fermes, inébranlable. Notre souffrance dans l’obéissance n’est que nos muscles qui brûlent ; c’est un rappel que nous allons quelque part. Qu’un jour nous serons avec lui. Qu’un jour nous serons comme lui.
Jésus a vécu, il est mort, et il a été ressuscité, afin que nous vivions et mourions et soyons ressuscités avec lui—afin qu’on le voie, physiquement, et entende sa voix, et le touche, et le connaisse, et le glorifie, pour toujours.
Et c’est ça, l’essentiel. Il nous serait tentant de lire ce passage et le centrer sur nous. De penser à nous-mêmes comme des futurs super-héros parce qu’on aura des corps glorifiés comme Jésus. Ou encore pire : d’imaginer que puisque Dieu nous a promis ces choses, quelque part nous les méritons.
Mais ce passage ne parle pas principalement de nous. Ce passage—du début à la fin—parle de Dieu. De ce qu’il a fait. De qui il est.
Dieu n’avait pas besoin de nous créer. Et il n’avait pas besoin de nous sauver. Il a toujours été parfaitement comblé en lui-même ; il n’avait pas besoin que nous remplissions un vide dans son cœur.
Et il n’a pas envoyé Jésus parce que (comme tu Loréal) « nous le valons bien. » Ça n’avait rien à voir avec nous. Marshall Segal dit : « Dieu n’a pas orchestré la semaine de la Pâques parce que vous lui manquiez désespérément, mais parce que vous aimer, malgré combien vous ne méritiez pas son amour, est une démonstration de combien il est aimant—de combien il est glorieux. »
Alors quand nous pensons au paradis, quand nous réfléchissons sur ces promesses merveilleuses, n’y pensons pas pour nous-mêmes. Que le réconfort de ces promesses fasse lever nos yeux vers Dieu ; soyons reconnaissants du simple fait de le connaître.
Si tu le connais, alors ne désespère pas. Regarde à ce qui est devant toi et continue—ton travail n’est pas en vain.
Et si vous ne le connaissez pas, n’imaginez pas que ce que j’ai dit ce matin n’est que pour nous. C’est pour tous ceux qui se tournent vers lui avec foi. Venez à lui, repentez-vous de vos péchés et faites-lui confiance…et croyez que notre Dieu est votre Dieu.
Related Media
Related Sermons