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Jesus Fulfills Prophecies

Destination: Golgotha  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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This is the third in the series, "Destination: Golgotha" which follows Jesus on His final journey from Capernaum to Jerusalem. This sermon looks at the Coronation of Jesus as He enters Jerusalem on a donkey.

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Luke 19:29-44
The Triumphal Entry
28 And when he had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem.29 When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples,30 saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here.31 If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’”32 So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them.33 And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?”34 And they said, “The Lord has need of it.”35 And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it.36 And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road.37 As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen,38 saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!”39 And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.”40 He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.”
Jesus Weeps over Jerusalem
41 And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it,42 saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes.43 For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side44 and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.”
Lakeview Baptist Church
March 11, 2018
Introduction
We’ve been traveling with Jesus towards his final Destination: Golgotha... looking at the last few days of Jesus before His Death...
So far, we have discovered that “Jesus was All In” in His ministry: Doing the will of God. Last time we discovered that “Jesus fulfilled His Purpose: the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.” (Luke 19:10) Hallelujah, Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!
Today, we will continue our journey alongside of Jesus as he makes His way to the city that contains the Temple which Herod built, Jerusalem.

The Christ Enters Jerusalem

Luke 19:28 And when he had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem.
Somewhere along the 10-mile journey from Jericho to Jerusalem, Jesus taught His disciples a parable because they were drawing neigh to Jerusalem, and He needed to let them know that the Kingdom of God was not going to appear immediately.
Luke 19:11 As they were listening to this, he went on to tell a parable because he was near Jerusalem, and they thought the kingdom of God was going to appear right away.
Jesus knew what the response of the people was going to be when they entered Jerusalem. They were thinking the Kingdom was going to come with His entering into the city, establishing Jerusalem as the capital of the world. Jesus parable simply explained that the kingdom will not be seen in its fullness until the return of Christ returns.”[1]
The city of Jericho, because of its flourishing oasis, became a crossroads through Palestine. The oasis attracted a lot of activity. The Jewish historian, Josephs, emphasized Jericho’s economic, administrative, and military importance for the region. The merchants plied this road with their caravans of trade goods. Armies used the road because of its ease and that made travel for the religious and pilgrims, a much simpler route. The travel between Jericho and Jerusalem, was much quicker because of this road.
Luke 19:29 When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet,
Each of the Synoptic Gospels contain this event. (Mathew 21:1; Mark 11:1; Luke 19:29). It is on this road that we pass the smaller towns of Bethphage and Bethany and finally arrive at the mount of Olives. Bethany is the hometown of Lazarus, Mary and Martha, close friends of Jesus (John 11:1).
It is at this point that Jesus gives instructions to two of His disciples.
Bethphage and Bethany were two miles east of Jerusalem, just over the Mount of Olives, The two disciples are not named in any of the Gospels.
…he sent two of the disciples,30 saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here.31 If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’”
It is difficult to identify where the disciples are to go, “Go into the village in front of you”. Luke lists two villages, Bethphage and Bethany, which one is it? The answer is found in Matthew’s account: “Now when they drew near to Jerusalem and came to Bethphage, to the Mount of Olives, then Jesus sent two disciples, 2 saying to them, “Go into the village in front of you.” Matthew’s dismissal of naming Bethany, leads me to believe the village where the colt is located is in Bethphage.
“the Lord has need of it.” The Greek word kyrios is used in this instance for “Lord.” Kyrios carries the idea of “supreme in authority.”
32 So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them.33 And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?”34 And they said, “The Lord has need of it.”
This is either a prophecy fulfilled, or as some have suggested, Jesus had made a prearranged agreement with the owner. The former is my thought as none of the Gospels contain that Jesus, broke away from his disciples, found someone who had the colt, and make arrangements to pick it up in the future. Therefore, I believe that this is prophetic.

Coronation

Prophecy Fulfilled

35 And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it.
Spreading their clothes on the donkey or on the road showed great honor to the person, in this case Jesus the Christ. Historically, this same level of adoration and honor was given to Jehu when he was pronounced king of Israel (2 Kings 9:13).
The Coming King of Zion
37 As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, 38 saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!”
Slowly the procession begins its short trip from the Mount of Olives to Jerusalem. The crowd of Jesus’ disciples is filled with such enthusiasm that they begin picking up others along the route. Some are just following along to see what the disturbance is about. Other’s have heard of this rabbi, of the miracles he has performed and just want a chance to see Him.
Notice the words, “the whole multitude of his disciples”. It is sometimes assumed that the only disciples were the Twelve. However, many were followers of this rabbi and His teachings. At one-point Jesus sent out seventy disciples into the countryside to proclaim the “kingdom of God.” and heal the sick and cast out devils. (Luke 10:1-17)
Matthew 21:9-11 And the crowds that went before him and that followed him were shouting, “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!” 10 And when he entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred up, saying, “Who is this?” 11 And the crowds said, “This is the prophet Jesus, from Nazareth of Galilee.”
Hosanna - Hosanna (Hb. “Save!” or “Please save!”; see Ps. 118:25). Here “Hosanna” points to the celebration of Jesus as a political, Davidic messiah (cf. 2 Sam. 7:14; Isa. 9:1–21; 11:1–16; Jer. 23:1–8). Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord is from Ps. 118:25–26, a prayer of blessing for the coming messianic kingdom (but see also notes on Matt. 23:39; Luke 13:35). The Triumphal Entry takes place at the beginning of Passover week, which recalls the Jewish people’s liberation from Egyptian slavery (see notes on Mark 14:17; John 2:13); the pilgrims now anticipate the messianic liberation from Rome’s oppression.[2]
Praise God with a loud voice” – The personal God of Israel, Yahweh, the supreme being. They were not holding back.
“…for all the mighty works that they had seen – they were shouting for this miracle working rabbi. With their own eyes they had seen “mighty works” performed.
“Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!”
Psalm 118:25-26 Save us, we pray, O Lord! O Lord, we pray, give us success! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! We bless you from the house of the Lord.
and
Zechariah 9:9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion!
Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem!
Behold, your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.
This is the only time that Jesus permitted a public demonstration on His behalf, and He did so for at least two reasons. First, He was fulfilling prophecy and presenting Himself as Israel’s king (Zech. 9:9). How much of this the crowd really understood we cannot tell, even though they responded by quoting their praises from a messianic psalm (Ps. 118:25–26). No doubt many of the Passover pilgrims thought that Jesus would now get rid of the Roman invaders and establish the glorious kingdom.
The second reason for this demonstration was to force the Jewish religious leaders to act. They had hoped to arrest Him after the Passover (Matt. 26:3–5), but God had ordained that His Son be slain on Passover as the “Lamb of God, who taketh away the sin of the world” (John 1:29; and see 1 Cor. 5:7). Every previous attempt to arrest Jesus had failed because “His hour had not yet come” (John 7:30; 8:20; also see John 13:1; 17:1). When they saw this great public celebration, the leaders knew that they had to act, and the willing cooperation of Judas solved their problem for them (Matt. 26:14–16).[3]
39 And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.” 40 He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.”
All creation was made to worship this King who is Lord of all.[4]
41 And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it, 42 saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. 43 For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side 44 and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.”
Psalm 78:41 They tested God again and again and provoked the Holy One of Israel.
Conclusion
The fulfillment of prophecies concerning the Messiah’s entrance into Jerusalem were accomplished.
The people were excited and yet did not understand what was happening.
Jesus was silent during the coronation.
The die is certainly cast…Jesus death is just days away.
[1] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008), 1997.
[2] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008), 1918.
[3] Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 254–255.
[4] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008), 1999.
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