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You Will Not be the Exception

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You Will Not be the Exception

1 Corinthians 10:12 KJV 1900
12 Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.
1 Corinthians 10:13 KJV 1900
13 There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.

(2) The negative example of Israel (10:1–13). 10:1. So that the Corinthians might not think God’s discipline would be an unlikely eventuality for a people so blessed as they (1:5), Paul cited the illustration of another group of people who were greatly blessed by God but yet experienced His severe discipline. Israel of old was reckless and unrestrained after her physical and spiritual freedom from tyranny in Egypt. As a result God meted out severe discipline by cutting short the lives of many Israelites. They were all in the “race” (9:24), but almost all were disqualified (9:27) in spite of their advantages.

Five advantages were enjoyed by Israel. First, all the liberated Israelites enjoyed the supernatural guidance (Ex. 13:21) and protection (Ex. 14:19–20) of the pillar of cloud in their Exodus from Egypt. The Corinthians had similarly experienced God’s guidance (cf. Luke 1:79) and protection (cf. 1 Peter 1:5). Second, all Israelites passed through the sea and experienced a miraculous deliverance from those who sought to take their lives (Ex. 14:21–28). So too had the Corinthians experienced a miraculous deliverance—salvation (cf. Heb. 2:14–15; Gal. 1:4).

10:2. Third, the Israelites were all baptized into Moses, that is, united with their spiritual head, God’s servant, who became the object of their trust (Ex. 14:31; cf. John 5:45). The Corinthians had been baptized into the body of Christ (1 Cor. 12:13) of which He is the Head (Eph. 1:22) and in whom they trusted (Matt. 12:21; Eph. 1:12).

10:3. As a fourth privilege, the Israelites all enjoyed spiritual food, the supernatural bread from heaven (Ex. 16:4, 15). The Corinthians too had eaten bread from heaven (cf. John 6:31–34).

10:4. As a fifth advantage, Paul listed the spiritual drink enjoyed by Israel in the desert (Ex. 17:6). According to Paul, Christ was the source of this supernatural water. Since the incident of the rock which produced water marked the beginning of Israel’s wilderness wanderings (Ex. 17:1–7) and happened again near the ending of their wanderings (Num. 20:1–13), Paul concluded that Christ accompanied them. Christ too was the source of supernatural water for the Corinthians (cf. John 4:10–14).

It is possible that these five blessings were intended by Paul to reflect the two ordinances of baptism (1 Cor. 10:1–2) and the Lord’s Supper (vv. 3–4) which the Corinthians may have thought communicated a magical protection like similar rites in some of the mystery religions. The Corinthians did seem to have a distorted view and practice of both of these ordinances (cf. 11:17–34; 15:29) which required correction.

10:5. The presence of supernatural privileges in the lives of Old Testament Israelites did not produce automatic success. On the contrary, in spite of their special advantages, most of them (in fact, all but two members of one generation, Joshua and Caleb) experienced God’s discipline, were disqualified, and died in the desert (Num. 14:29). In light of this, Paul’s avowed need for personal self-discipline (1 Cor. 9:27) was genuine since even Moses was disqualified for the prize (Num. 20:12).

10:6. Since this was so, the Corinthians’ complacency in matters of self-discipline and their corresponding penchant for self-indulgence required immediate remedial action. Christian freedom was not meant to lead to self-indulgence but to selfless service (cf. Gal. 5:13), as the behavior of past Israelites illustrated.

Paralleling the fivefold blessings enjoyed by Israel in their newfound freedom from Egypt, Paul proceeded to recount a fivefold failure experienced by Israel during this time. He began with the Israelites’ craving for the pleasures of Egypt, summarized in their plaintive cry, “Give us meat to eat!” (Num. 11:4–34, esp. v. 13) God gave them what they wanted but while the meat was still between their teeth, He struck them with a plague. The Israelites named the cemetery for those who were killed “Kibroth Hattaavah” (“graves of craving”; Num. 11:34). The application to the Corinthian situation was obvious (cf. 1 Cor. 8:13).

10:7. Second, many in Israel failed by participating in idolatry (Ex. 32:1–6) and paid for it with their lives (Ex. 32:28, 35). Apparently some Corinthians were interested in more than meat in the pagan temples (1 Cor. 8:10; 10:14). For those who thought they as Christians could take part in idolatry with impunity, Paul intended, with illustrations like this, to knock out the false props which supported their behavior (v. 12) before God intervened and took their lives.

10:8. A third failure among the privileged Israelites was in the area of sexual immorality. In the Israelites’ case the immorality was associated with idolatry (Num. 25:1–2), which also characterized much pagan worship in the first century. But the Corinthians indulged in immorality in contexts other than idolatry, as the instances of rebuke in 1 Corinthians 5:1 and 6:18 illustrate. As God had brought death to the immoral among the Israelites (Num. 25:4–9), He could do in Corinth (e.g., 1 Cor. 5:5), a sobering thought for the libertines who said, “Everything is permissible” (6:12; 10:23).

A possible solution to the apparent discrepancy in the death count found in Numbers 25:9 (24,000) and Paul’s figure of 23,000 may reside in the phrase one day. Moses and most of Israel were mourning the death of those who had been executed by the judges (Num. 25:5) or killed by an ongoing plague. Meanwhile Phineas was dispatching an Israelite man and Moabite woman in their last act of immorality (Num. 25:6–8), which brought to completion God’s discipline of the immoral Israelites and ended the death toll by plague at 24,000, a number probably intended as a summary figure.

Another explanation of the 24,000 in Numbers (contra. Paul’s 23,000) is that the former included the leaders (cf. Num. 25:4), whereas the latter did not.

10:9. The Israelites’ fourth failure was the presuming of some to question the plan and purpose of God on their trek to Canaan. As a result they were killed by snakes (Num. 21:4–6). Did the Corinthians think that they knew better than God the path that would bring them to heaven? (cf. 1 Cor. 1:18–3:20)

10:10. Israel’s fifth failure, which God disciplined with death, occurred when they spoke rebelliously against God’s appointed leaders, Moses and Aaron (Num. 16:41–49). Was Paul facing a similar situation as an outgrowth of the Corinthians’ party spirit? (cf. 1 Cor. 1:11; 4:18–19) It is possible that each of these failures found expression in the Corinthian issue of eating food sacrificed to idols.

10:11. God’s dealings with Israel were more than a matter of historical curiosity for Paul. They were examples (cf. v. 6) and warnings for the Corinthians that the God with whom they had to deal, who was bringing His interaction with people to a close in this fulfillment of the ages, was the same God who disciplined the Israelites with death and would do so again (cf. 11:30).

10:12. If the Corinthians believed their standing in Christ and corresponding freedom could be exercised in sin with impunity, they were wrong, possibly dead wrong.

10:13. After kicking out the props of false security, Paul pointed toward the One on whom the Corinthians could rely. The temptations that seized the Corinthians were like those people had always faced. They could be met and endured by depending on God, who is faithful. Part of the Corinthian problem, of course, was that some in the face of temptation were not looking for a way out by endurance, but a way in for indulgence.

the key to unlocking this text is found in the word
examples - vs 6 vs 11
Exploring 1 Corinthians: An Expository Commentary Part 4: Difficulties in the Church (1 Corinthians 7:1–14:40)

Paul is still dealing with difficulties in the church (1 Cor. 7:11–14:40) and especially with matters concerning our personal walk (7:1–11:1) He has set before the Corinthians his exhortation (7:1–8:13) regarding matters relating to marriage (7:1–40) and meat (8:1–13), and he has set before them his example (9:1–27

Paul is still dealing with difficulties in the church () and especially with matters concerning our personal walk (7:1–11:1)
He has set before the Corinthians his exhortation (7:1–8:13) regarding matters relating to marriage (7:1–40) and meat (8:1–13), and he has set before them his example (9:1–27)
I will be the one that gets away with it.
Illustration -
Married man with a encounter of someone that is not his/her spouse
An affair
Stealing at work
Lying
Grumbling and complaining against spiritual leadership
In the end was death and destruction
Numbers 14:28–30 KJV 1900
28 Say unto them, As truly as I live, saith the Lord, as ye have spoken in mine ears, so will I do to you: 29 Your carcases shall fall in this wilderness; and all that were numbered of you, according to your whole number, from twenty years old and upward, which have murmured against me, 30 Doubtless ye shall not come into the land, concerning which I sware to make you dwell therein, save Caleb the son of Jephunneh, and Joshua the son of Nun.
Just as i am not to offend with meats sacrificed to idols
I am not to use grace as a license to sin.
The Corinthian were sinning at will and believed that there were no consequences.

I The Blessings

1 Corinthians 10:1–6 KJV 1900
1 Moreover, brethren, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea; 2 And were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea; 3 And did all eat the same spiritual meat; 4 And did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them: and that Rock was Christ. 5 But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness. 6 Now these things were our examples, to the intent we should not lust after evil things, as they also lusted.
1 Corinthians 10:1–5 KJV 1900
1 Moreover, brethren, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea; 2 And were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea; 3 And did all eat the same spiritual meat; 4 And did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them: and that Rock was Christ. 5 But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness.
The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 10: Romans through Galatians 4. Warning: Israel’s Lack of Self-Restraint (10:1–13)

In this passage Paul takes the sins of Israel during the time of Moses as a basis for warning the Corinthians. Though the people of Israel had the covenant blessings and were miraculously delivered and sustained, yet most of them died in the wilderness because of disobedience and unbelief. Paul uses their experiences as examples, which he exhorts the Corinthians to heed.

In this passage Paul takes the sins of Israel during the time of Moses as a basis for warning the Corinthians.
In this passage Paul takes the sins of Israel during the time of Moses as a basis for warning the Corinthians.
Though the people of Israel had the covenant blessings and were miraculously delivered and sustained, yet most of them died in the wilderness because of disobedience and unbelief. Paul uses their experiences as examples, which he exhorts the Corinthians to heed.
Paul cited the illustration of another group of people who were greatly blessed by God but yet experienced His severe discipline.
Israel of old was reckless and unrestrained after her physical and spiritual freedom from tyranny in Egypt.
As a result God meted out severe discipline by cutting short the lives of many Israelites. They were all in the “race” (9:24), but almost all were disqualified (9:27) in spite of their advantages.
Look at their five advantages :
Guidance 10:1 - First, all the liberated Israelites enjoyed the supernatural guidance () and protection () of the pillar of cloud in their Exodus from Egypt. The Corinthians had similarly experienced God’s guidance (cf. ) and protection (cf. ).
First, all the liberated Israelites enjoyed the supernatural guidance () and protection () of the pillar of cloud in their Exodus from Egypt. The Corinthians had similarly experienced God’s guidance (cf. ) and protection (cf. ). Second, all Israelites passed through the sea and experienced a miraculous deliverance from those who sought to take their lives (). So too had the Corinthians experienced a miraculous deliverance—salvation (cf. ; ).
Exodus 13:21 KJV 1900
21 And the Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way; and by night in a pillar of fire, to give them light; to go by day and night:
1 Peter 1:5 KJV 1900
5 Who are kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time.
2. Deliverance 10.1 , all Israelites passed through the sea and experienced a miraculous deliverance from those who sought to take their lives ().
Second, all Israelites passed through the sea and experienced a miraculous deliverance from those who sought to take their lives (). So too had the Corinthians experienced a miraculous deliverance—salvation (cf. ; ).
So too had the Corinthians experienced a miraculous deliverance—salvation (cf. ; ).
Second, all Israelites passed through the sea and experienced a miraculous deliverance from those who sought to take their lives (). So too had the Corinthians experienced a miraculous deliverance—salvation (cf. ; ).
Galatians 1:4 KJV 1900
4 Who gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this present evil world, according to the will of God and our Father:
3. Baptized brought in 10:2. Third, the Israelites were all baptized into Moses, that is, united with their spiritual head, God’s servant, who became the object of their trust (; cf. ).
10:2. Third, the Israelites were all baptized into Moses, that is, united with their spiritual head, God’s servant, who became the object of their trust (; cf. ). The Corinthians had been baptized into the body of Christ () of which He is the Head () and in whom they trusted (; ).
The Corinthians had been baptized into the body of Christ () of which He is the Head () and in whom they trusted (; ).
4. Food from heaven 10:3. As a fourth privilege, the Israelites all enjoyed spiritual food, the supernatural bread from heaven (, ). The Corinthians too had eaten bread from heaven (cf. ).
Exodus 16:4 KJV 1900
4 Then said the Lord unto Moses, Behold, I will rain bread from heaven for you; and the people shall go out and gather a certain rate every day, that I may prove them, whether they will walk in my law, or no.
5. Spiritual Drink 10:4. As a fifth advantage, Paul listed the spiritual drink enjoyed by Israel in the desert (). According to Paul, Christ was the source of this supernatural water. Since the incident of the rock which produced water marked the beginning of Israel’s wilderness wanderings () and happened again near the ending of their wanderings (), Paul concluded that Christ accompanied them. Christ too was the source of supernatural water for the Corinthians (cf. ).
10:4. As a fifth advantage, Paul listed the spiritual drink enjoyed by Israel in the desert (). According to Paul, Christ was the source of this supernatural water. Since the incident of the rock which produced water marked the beginning of Israel’s wilderness wanderings () and happened again near the ending of their wanderings (), Paul concluded that Christ accompanied them. Christ too was the source of supernatural water for the Corinthians (cf. ).
Exodus 17:6 KJV 1900
6 Behold, I will stand before thee there upon the rock in Horeb; and thou shalt smite the rock, and there shall come water out of it, that the people may drink. And Moses did so in the sight of the elders of Israel.

III The Betrayal

1 Corinthians 10:5–10 KJV 1900
5 But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness. 6 Now these things were our examples, to the intent we should not lust after evil things, as they also lusted. 7 Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play. 8 Neither let us commit fornication, as some of them committed, and fell in one day three and twenty thousand. 9 Neither let us tempt Christ, as some of them also tempted, and were destroyed of serpents. 10 Neither murmur ye, as some of them also murmured, and were destroyed of the destroyer.
1 cor 10.5-10
10:5. The presence of supernatural privileges in the lives of Old Testament Israelites did not produce automatic success.
On the contrary, in spite of their special advantages, most of them (in fact, all but two members of one generation, Joshua and Caleb) experienced God’s discipline, were disqualified, and died in the desert ().
In light of this, Paul’s avowed need for personal self-discipline () was genuine since even Moses was disqualified for the prize ().
1 Corinthians 9:27 KJV 1900
27 But I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection: lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway.
Immediate action needed :
10:6. Since this was so, the Corinthians’ complacency in matters of self-discipline and their corresponding penchant for self-indulgence required immediate remedial action. Christian freedom was not meant to lead to self-indulgence but to selfless service (cf. ), as the behavior of past Israelites illustrated.
Galatians 5:13 KJV 1900
13 For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another.
five failure s
1. 10.6 - He began with the Israelites’ craving for the pleasures of Egypt, summarized in their plaintive cry, “Give us meat to eat!” (, esp. v. 13)
Paralleling the fivefold blessings enjoyed by Israel in their newfound freedom from Egypt, Paul proceeded to recount a fivefold failure experienced by Israel during this time. He began with the Israelites’ craving for the pleasures of Egypt, summarized in their plaintive cry, “Give us meat to eat!” (, esp. v. 13) God gave them what they wanted but while the meat was still between their teeth, He struck them with a plague. The Israelites named the cemetery for those who were killed “Kibroth Hattaavah” (“graves of craving”; ). The application to the Corinthian situation was obvious (cf. ).
Numbers 11:13 KJV 1900
13 Whence should I have flesh to give unto all this people? for they weep unto me, saying, Give us flesh, that we may eat.
num 11.13He began with the Israelites’ craving for the pleasures of Egypt, summarized in their plaintive cry, “Give us meat to eat!” (, esp. v. 13) God gave them what they wanted but while the meat was still between their teeth, He struck them with a plague. The Israelites named the cemetery for those who were killed “Kibroth Hattaavah” (“graves of craving”; ). The application to the Corinthian situation was obvious (cf. ).
God gave them what they wanted but while the meat was still between their teeth, He struck them with a plague. The Israelites named the cemetery for those who were killed “Kibroth Hattaavah” (“graves of craving”; ).
The application to the Corinthian situation was obvious (cf. ).
1 Corinthians 8:13 KJV 1900
13 Wherefore, if meat make my brother to offend, I will eat no flesh while the world standeth, lest I make my brother to offend.
2. 10:7. Second, many in Israel failed by participating in idolatry () and paid for it with their lives (, ).
2. 10:7. Second, many in Israel failed by participating in idolatry () and paid for it with their lives (, ).
Exodus 32:5 KJV 1900
5 And when Aaron saw it, he built an altar before it; and Aaron made proclamation, and said, To morrow is a feast to the Lord.
ex 3
Exodus 32:6 KJV 1900
6 And they rose up early on the morrow, and offered burnt offerings, and brought peace offerings; and the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play.
Exodus 32:4 KJV 1900
4 And he received them at their hand, and fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf: and they said, These be thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt.
ex 32.
Apparently some Corinthians were interested in more than meat in the pagan temples (; ). For those who thought they as Christians could take part in idolatry with impunity, Paul intended, with illustrations like this, to knock out the false props which supported their behavior (v. 12) before God intervened and took their lives.
Apparently some Corinthians were interested in more than meat in the pagan temples (; ). For those who thought they as Christians could take part in idolatry with impunity, Paul intended, with illustrations like this, to knock out the false props which supported their behavior (v. 12) before God intervened and took their lives.
3. 10:8. A third failure among the privileged Israelites was in the area of sexual immorality.
Numbers 25:1–2 KJV 1900
1 And Israel abode in Shittim, and the people began to commit whoredom with the daughters of Moab. 2 And they called the people unto the sacrifices of their gods: and the people did eat, and bowed down to their gods.
In the Israelites’ case the immorality was associated with idolatry (), which also characterized much pagan worship in the first century.
But the Corinthians indulged in immorality in contexts other than idolatry, as the instances of rebuke in and 6:18 illustrate. As God had brought death to the immoral among the Israelites (), He could do in Corinth (e.g., ), a sobering thought for the libertines who said, “Everything is permissible” (6:12; 10:23).
Another explanation of the 24,000 in Numbers (contra. Paul’s 23,000) is that the former included the leaders (cf. ), whereas the latter did not.
4. 10:9. The Israelites’ fourth failure was the presuming of some to question the plan and purpose of God on their trek to Canaan. As a result they were killed by snakes (). Did the Corinthians think that they knew better than God the path that would bring them to heaven? (cf. )
Arguing with God’s direction .
1 Corinthians 1:18 KJV 1900
18 For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God.
1 Corinthians 10:18 KJV 1900
18 Behold Israel after the flesh: are not they which eat of the sacrifices partakers of the altar?
5. 10:10. Israel’s fifth failure, which God disciplined with death, occurred when they spoke rebelliously against God’s appointed leaders, Moses and Aaron ().
1 Corinthians 1:11 KJV 1900
11 For it hath been declared unto me of you, my brethren, by them which are of the house of Chloe, that there are contentions among you.
1 cor
10:10. Israel’s fifth failure, which God disciplined with death, occurred when they spoke rebelliously against God’s appointed leaders, Moses and Aaron (). Was Paul facing a similar situation as an outgrowth of the Corinthians’ party spirit? (cf. ; ) It is possible that each of these failures found expression in the Corinthian issue of eating food sacrificed to idols.
Was Paul facing a similar situation as an outgrowth of the Corinthians’ party spirit? (cf. ; ) It is possible that each of these failures found expression in the Corinthian issue of eating food sacrificed to idols.
Was Paul facing a similar situation as an outgrowth of the Corinthians’ party spirit? (cf. ; ) It is possible that each of these failures found expression in the Corinthian issue of eating food sacrificed to idols.

III The Byproduct

1 Corinthians 10:11–13 KJV 1900
11 Now all these things happened unto them for ensamples: and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come. 12 Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall. 13 There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.
1 cor
The blessing could be ignored and betrayal to the giver.
The blessing could also be praised and given thanks
The temptations of
immorality
idolatry
rebuking leadership
could be overcome and God will give you a way to escape
10:11. God’s dealings with Israel were more than a matter of historical curiosity for Paul.
10:11. God’s dealings with Israel were more than a matter of historical curiosity for Paul. They were examples (cf. v. 6) and warnings for the Corinthians that the God with whom they had to deal, who was bringing His interaction with people to a close in this fulfillment of the ages, was the same God who disciplined the Israelites with death and would do so again (cf. 11:30).
Examples - they should be closely evaluated.
They were examples (cf. v. 6) and warnings for the Corinthians that the God with whom they had to deal, who was bringing His interaction with people to a close in this fulfillment of the ages, was the same God who disciplined the Israelites with death and would do so again (cf. 11:30).
Proverbs 16:18 KJV 1900
18 Pride goeth before destruction, And an haughty spirit before a fall.
Matthew 26:33 KJV 1900
33 Peter answered and said unto him, Though all men shall be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended.
1 Corinthians 8:2 KJV 1900
2 And if any man think that he knoweth any thing, he knoweth nothing yet as he ought to know.
This will not happen to me.....
Children of Alcoholics saw the example and repeat it ...
I will not let that happen
10:12. If the Corinthians believed their standing in Christ and corresponding freedom could be exercised in sin with impunity, they were wrong, possibly dead wrong.
10:13. After kicking out the props of false security, Paul pointed toward the One on whom the Corinthians could rely. The temptations that seized the Corinthians were like those people had always faced. They could be met and endured by depending on God, who is faithful. Part of the Corinthian problem, of course, was that some in the face of temptation were not looking for a way out by endurance, but a way in for indulgence.
Paul then closes with a statement on self disciple and guidance from God
1 Corinthians 9:27 KJV 1900
27 But I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection: lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway.
What I am asking you to Know?
You will not be the exception....
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