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LBCF 19.3

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LBCF 19.3-5

to fconvert himself, or to prepare himself thereunto. ( d , ; e ,
Besides this law, commonly called moral, God was pleased to give to the people of Israel ceremonial laws, containing several typical ordinances, partly of worship, prefiguring Christ, his graces, actions, sufferings, and benefits; and partly holding forth divers instructions of moral duties, all which ceremonial laws being appointed only to the time of reformation, are, by Jesus Christ the true Messiah and only lawgiver, who was furnished with power from the Father for that end, abrogated and taken away.
To them also he gave sundry judicial laws, which expired together with the state of that people, not obliging any now by virtue of that institution; their general equity only being of modern use.
The 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith. N. p. Print.
The moral law doth for ever bind all, as well justified persons as others, to the obedience thereof, and that not only in regard of the matter contained in it, but also in respect of the authority of God the Creator, who gave it; neither doth Christ in the Gospel any way dissolve, but much strengthen this obligation.
The moral law doth for ever bind all, kas well justified persons as others, to the obedience thereof, and that not only in regard of the matter contained in it, but also in respect of the lauthority of God the Creator, who gave it; nei-ther doth Christ in the Gospel any way dissolve, mbut much strengthen this obligation.
( k ; ,; lJam 2:10-11; m ; )
The 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith. N. p. Print.
The 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith. N. p. Print.

Survey of Scripture

so as a natural man, being altogether averse from that good, and dead in sin (,),
so as a natural man, being altogether averse from that good, eand dead in sin, is not able by his own strength
Besides this law, commonly called moral, God was pleased to give to the people of Israel ceremonial laws, containing several typical ordinances, partly of worship, prefiguring Christ, his graces, actions, sufferings, and benefits (; );
Hebrews 10:1 NKJV
For the law, having a shadow of the good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with these same sacrifices, which they offer continually year by year, make those who approach perfect.
Colossians 2:17 NKJV
which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of Christ.
to fconvert himself, or to prepare himself thereunto. (,
and partly holding forth divers instructions of moral duties, all which ceremonial laws being appointed only to the time of reformation (),
1 Corinthians 5:7 NKJV
Therefore purge out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, since you truly are unleavened. For indeed Christ, our Passover, was sacrificed for us.
is not able by his own strength to convert himself, or to prepare himself thereunto.
are, by Jesus Christ the true Messiah and only law-giver, who was furnished with power from the Father for that end, abrogated and taken away (,; ,).
Colossians 2:14 NKJV
having wiped out the handwriting of requirements that was against us, which was contrary to us. And He has taken it out of the way, having nailed it to the cross.
( f g ; h)
Colossians 2:16–17 NKJV
So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or sabbaths, which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of Christ.
Ephesians 2:14 NKJV
For He Himself is our peace, who has made both one, and has broken down the middle wall of separation,
Ephesians 2:16 NKJV
and that He might reconcile them both to God in one body through the cross, thereby putting to death the enmity.
To them also he gave sundry judicial laws, which expired together with the state of that people, not obliging any now by virtue of that institution; their general iequity only being of modern use. ( i1Co 9:8-10)
To them also he gave sundry judicial laws, which expired together with the state of that people, not obliging any now by virtue of that institution; their general equity only being of modern use ().
The 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith. N. p. Print.
1 Corinthians 9:8–10 NKJV
Do I say these things as a mere man? Or does not the law say the same also? For it is written in the law of Moses, “You shall not muzzle an ox while it treads out the grain.” Is it oxen God is concerned about? Or does He say it altogether for our sakes? For our sakes, no doubt, this is written, that he who plows should plow in hope, and he who threshes in hope should be partaker of his hope.
The moral law doth for ever bind all, kas well justified persons as others, to the obedience thereof, and that not only in regard of the matter contained in it, but also in respect of the lauthority of God the Creator, who gave it; nei-ther doth Christ in the Gospel any way dissolve, mbut much strengthen this obligation.
The moral law doth for ever bind all, as well justified persons as others, to the obedience thereof (; ,),
Romans 13:8–10 NKJV
Owe no one anything except to love one another, for he who loves another has fulfilled the law. For the commandments, “You shall not commit adultery,” “You shall not murder,” “You shall not steal,” “You shall not bear false witness,” “You shall not covet,” and if there is any other commandment, are all summed up in this saying, namely, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” Love does no harm to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the law.
James 2:8 NKJV
If you really fulfill the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you do well;
James 2:10–12 NKJV
For whoever shall keep the whole law, and yet stumble in one point, he is guilty of all. For He who said, “Do not commit adultery,” also said, “Do not murder.” Now if you do not commit adultery, but you do murder, you have become a transgressor of the law. So speak and so do as those who will be judged by the law of liberty.
and that not only in regard of the matter contained in it, but also in respect of the authority of God the Creator, who gave it ();
James 2:10–11 NKJV
For whoever shall keep the whole law, and yet stumble in one point, he is guilty of all. For He who said, “Do not commit adultery,” also said, “Do not murder.” Now if you do not commit adultery, but you do murder, you have become a transgressor of the law.
neither doth Christ in the Gospel any way dissolve, but much strengthen this obligation (; )
( k l m ; )
Matthew 5:17–19 NKJV
“Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill. For assuredly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, one jot or one tittle will by no means pass from the law till all is fulfilled. Whoever therefore breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches men so, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does and teaches them, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven.
Romans 3:31 NKJV
Do we then make void the law through faith? Certainly not! On the contrary, we establish the law.

What Does This Teach Us?

Note: This is rather close to the WCF, the WCF has a reference to Israel, as a church under age.
The ceremonial law was specific to the Old Covenant worship
The ceremonial law prescribed the rites and eternal ordinances which were to be observed by Israel in the external worship of God.
These ceremonies were chiefly designed to prefigure Christ, and lead them to the knowledge of the way of salvation through him.
1. The ceremonial law respected the Jews in their ecclesiastical capacity, or as a Church, and prescribed the rites and carnal ordinances which were to be observed by them in the external worship of God. These ceremonies were chiefly designed to prefigure Christ, and lead them to the knowledge of the way of salvation through him.—Reb. x. 1. This law is abrogated under the New Testament dispensation. This appears—1. From the nature of the law itself. It was given to the Jews to separate them from the idolatrous rites of
This law is no longer necessary under the New Testament dispensation.
We know this [Robert Shaw. The Reformed Faith]:
From the nature of the law itself. It was given to the Jews to separate them from the idolatrous rites of other nations, and to preserve their religion uncorrupted. But when the gospel was preached to all nations, and Jews and Gentiles were gathered into one body, under Christ, their Head, the wall of separation was taken down.—
other nations, and to preserve their religion uncorrupted. But when the gospel was preached to all nations, and Jews and Gentiles were gathered into one body, under Christ, their Head, the wall of separation was taken down.—, . 2. Because these ceremonies were only figures of good things to come, imposed upon the Jews until the time of reformation, and were abrogated by Christ, in whom they were realised and substantiated—. Because these ceremonies were given to the Israelites to typify and represent Christ and his death; and, since Christ has come, and has, by his death and satisfaction, accomplished all that they prefigured, these types must be abolished.—. 4. Because many of these rites were restricted to the temple of Jerusalem, and the temple being now destroyed, these rites must cease along with it. 5. Because the apostles expressly taught, that the ceremonial law is abrogated under the Christian dispensation.—. One chief design of the Epistle to the Hebrews is, to prove that this law must necessarily be annulled.—.
Ephesians 2:14–15 NKJV
For He Himself is our peace, who has made both one, and has broken down the middle wall of separation, having abolished in His flesh the enmity, that is, the law of commandments contained in ordinances, so as to create in Himself one new man from the two, thus making peace,
Because these ceremonies were only figures of good things to come, imposed upon the Jews until the time of reformation, and were abrogated by Christ, in whom they were realized and substantiated—.
Hebrews 9:9–12 NKJV
It was symbolic for the present time in which both gifts and sacrifices are offered which cannot make him who performed the service perfect in regard to the conscience—concerned only with foods and drinks, various washings, and fleshly ordinances imposed until the time of reformation. But Christ came as High Priest of the good things to come, with the greater and more perfect tabernacle not made with hands, that is, not of this creation. Not with the blood of goats and calves, but with His own blood He entered the Most Holy Place once for all, having obtained eternal redemption.
Because these ceremonies were given to the Israelites to typify and represent Christ and his death; and, since Christ has come, and has, by his death and satisfaction, accomplished all that they prefigured, these types must be abolished.—.
Colossians 2:17 NKJV
which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of Christ.
Because many of these rites were restricted to the temple of Jerusalem, and the temple being now destroyed, these rites must cease along with it.
Because the apostles expressly taught, that the ceremonial law is abrogated under the Christian dispensation.—. One chief design of the Epistle to the Hebrews is, to prove that this law must necessarily be annulled.— .
Acts 15:24 NKJV
Since we have heard that some who went out from us have troubled you with words, unsettling your souls, saying, “You must be circumcised and keep the law”—to whom we gave no such commandment—
Hebrews 8:12 NKJV
For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their lawless deeds I will remember no more.”
The judicial law respected the Jews in their political capacity
As a nation, consisting of those institutions which God prescribed to them for their civil government.
This law, as far as the Jewish polity was peculiar, has also been entirely abolished; but as far as it contains any statute founded in the law of nature common to all nations, it is still obligatory.
The moral law speaks of men and their relationship to their Creator, and to one another, it retains its authority under all dispensations.
In opposition to the Antinomians, who say that believers are released from the obligation of the moral law, our Confession teaches that this law is perpetually binding on justified persons, as well as others.
Believers are, indeed, delivered from this law in its covenant form; but they are still under it as a rule of life, in the hand of the Mediator, being "not without law to God, but under the law to Christ."—.
1 Corinthians 9:21 NKJV
to those who are without law, as without law (not being without law toward God, but under law toward Christ), that I might win those who are without law;
Christ, in the most solemn and explicit manner, declared, that he "came not to destroy the law, but to fulfil it." - .
He fulfilled it, as a covenant, by his own perfect obedience, and his most grievous sufferings in the room of his people; and its heavenly precepts he has enforced upon their minds, by the most cogent motives, as a perfect rule of duty. The gospel, instead of weakening the obligation of the law, confirms and strengthens its authority, and enforces obedience to its precepts by the strongest motives: "Do we make void the law through faith? God forbid; nay,
we establish the law."—. Although the moral law is to believers divested of its covenant form, it remains immutably the same, in regard both to its matter and its authority. And as the law was binding on the first man as a rule of life, antecedent to any covenant-transaction between God and him, we may easily understand that the law may be entirely divested of its covenant form, while it continues in full force as a rule of moral conduct.
Robert Shaw. The Reformed Faith. N. p. Print.
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