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Cross of Messiah Chapter 6

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Is the idea of the God-man, Messiah Yeshua, dying in our place hard to understand?
Have you ever taken the fall for somebody? Has someone ever taken the fall for you? What motivated that action?
What do you think is the difference between a person taking the fall for another person and the Messiah substituting himself for us?
There are two theological words John Stott says we need to cling to - substitution and satisfaction - when speaking of the Cross of the Messiah. What does John Stott mean by Substitution? What does he mean by satisfaction?
The Cross of Christ Sacrifice in the Old Testament

The notion of substitution is that one person takes the place of another, especially in order to bear that person’s pain and so save him or her from it.

The Cross of Christ God in Christ

The biblical gospel of atonement is of God satisfying himself by substituting himself for us.

The Cross of Christ God in Christ

The biblical gospel of atonement is of God satisfying himself by substituting himself for us.

How does John Stott define sin?
The Cross of Christ God in Christ

For the essence of sin is man substituting himself for God, while the essence of salvation is God substituting himself for man. Man asserts himself against God and puts himself where only God deserves to be; God sacrifices himself for man and puts himself where only man deserves to be. Man claims prerogatives that belong to God alone; God accepts penalties that belong to man alone.

Write out a one word or two or three word phrase that sums up what each of the following passages teach us about why Messiah died.
Romans 8:3 TLV
For what was impossible for the Torah—since it was weakened on account of the flesh—God has done. Sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and as a sin offering, He condemned sin in the flesh—
1 Peter 3:18 TLV
For Messiah once suffered for sins also—the righteous for the unrighteous—in order to bring you to God. He was put to death in the flesh, but made alive by the Ruach.
Ephesians 5:2 TLV
and walk in love, just as Messiah also loved us and gave Himself up for us as an offering and sacrifice to God for a fragrant aroma.
Galatians 1:4 TLV
who gave Himself for our sins to rescue us from this present evil age, according to the will of our God and Father—
Hebrews 9:14 TLV
how much more will the blood of Messiah—who through the eternal Spirit offered Himself without blemish to God—cleanse our conscience from dead works to serve the living God?
Hebrews 9:15 TLV
For this reason He is the mediator of a new covenant, in order that those called may receive the promised eternal inheritance—since a death has taken place that redeems them from violations under the first covenant.
Hebrews 9:27–28 TLV
And just as it is appointed for men to die once, and after this judgment, so also Messiah, was offered once to bear the sins of many. He will appear a second time, apart from sin, to those eagerly awaiting Him for salvation.
Hebrews 10:14 TLV
For by one offering He has perfected forever those being made holy.
Hebrews 10:
Hebrews 10:19–21 TLV
Therefore, brothers and sisters, we have boldness to enter into the Holies by the blood of Yeshua. He inaugurated a new and living way for us through the curtain—that is, His flesh. We also have a Kohen Gadol over God’s household.
Hebrews 10:19-
Colossians 3:13–14 TLV
bearing with one another and forgiving each other, if anyone has a grievance against another. Just as the Lord pardoned you, so also you must pardon others. But above all these things put on love, which is the bond of perfect harmony.
Colossians 2:13–14 TLV
When you were dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made you alive together with Him when He pardoned us all our transgressions. He wiped out the handwritten record of debts with the decrees against us, which was hostile to us. He took it away by nailing it to the cross.
Romans 8:31–37 TLV
What then shall we say in view of these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? He who did not spare His own Son but gave Him up for us all, how shall He not also with Him freely give us all things? Who shall bring a charge against God’s elect? It is God who justifies. Who is the one who condemns? It is Messiah, who died, and moreover was raised, and is now at the right hand of God and who also intercedes for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Messiah? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written, “For Your sake we are being put to death all day long; we are counted as sheep for the slaughter.” But in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us.
Romans 8:31–39 TLV
What then shall we say in view of these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? He who did not spare His own Son but gave Him up for us all, how shall He not also with Him freely give us all things? Who shall bring a charge against God’s elect? It is God who justifies. Who is the one who condemns? It is Messiah, who died, and moreover was raised, and is now at the right hand of God and who also intercedes for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Messiah? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written, “For Your sake we are being put to death all day long; we are counted as sheep for the slaughter.” But in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us. For I am convinced that neither death nor life, nor angels nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor any other created thing will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Messiah Yeshua our Lord.
Romans 8:31-
Romans 5:8–9 TLV
But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Messiah died for us. How much more then, having now been set right by His blood, shall we be saved from God’s wrath through Him.
How would you respond to a person who says, “God is cruel if He has to punish His Son to forgive my sins?”
The Cross of Christ Who Is the Substitute?

The first proposal is that the substitute was the man Christ Jesus, viewed as a human being and conceived as an individual separate from both God and us, an independent third party. Those who begin with this a priori lay themselves open to gravely distorted understandings of the atonement and so bring the truth of substitution into disrepute. They tend to present the cross in one or other of two ways, according to whether the initiative was Christ’s or God’s. In the one case Christ is pictured as intervening in order to pacify an angry God and wrest from him a grudging salvation. In the other, the intervention is ascribed to God, who proceeds to punish the innocent Jesus in place of us the guilty sinners who had deserved the punishment. In both cases God and Christ are sundered from one another: either Christ persuades God or God punishes Christ. What is characteristic of both presentations is that they denigrate the Father. Reluctant to suffer himself, he victimizes Christ instead. Reluctant to forgive, he is prevailed on by Christ to do so. He is seen as a pitiless ogre whose wrath has to be assuaged, whose disinclination to act has to be overcome, by the loving self-sacrifice of Jesus.

The Cross of Christ Who Is the Substitute?

We must not, then, speak of God punishing Jesus or of Jesus persuading God, for to do so is to set them over against each other as if they acted independently of each other or were even in conflict with each other. We must never make Christ the object of God’s punishment or God the object of Christ’s persuasion, for both God and Christ were subjects not objects, taking the initiative together to save sinners.

How is the work of the Father different than the work of the Son in the cross?
The Cross of Christ God in Christ

Our substitute, then, who took our place and died our death on the cross, was neither Christ alone (since that would make him a third party thrust in between God and us), nor God alone (since that would undermine the historical incarnation), but God in Christ, who was truly and fully both God and man and who on that account was uniquely qualified to represent both God and man and to mediate between them. If we speak only of Christ suffering and dying, we overlook the initiative of the Father. If we speak only of God suffering and dying, we overlook the mediation of the Son. The New Testament authors never attribute the atonement either to Christ in such a way as to disassociate him from the Father, or to God in such a way as to dispense with Christ, but rather to God and Christ, or to God acting in and through Christ with his whole-hearted concurrence.

Look carefully at . How is the work of the Father distinguished from the work of the Son?
Look carefully at . On this piece of paper, create two columns. One column write “walking in darkness, anti-love” and the other “walking in love, light.” In each column, write what Rabbi Paul says is walking in darkness, anti-love” and “walking in love, light.
At the top of the columns write the word “crucified” over the “walking in darkness, anti-love” column and . Then over the “walking in love, light” write “alive to God” and .
Look again at . And answer these two questions. First, how do you imitate God as dearly loved children? Second, what will be the outcome of living this kind of life?
Based on what we have discussed in this chapter, what is one thing in your life you need to have radically changed by the atoning work of the Messiah?
What is one thing from this chapter that we have read or discussed that will help you to worship God with more depth and breadth?
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