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Remnant of Israel -

I ask then: Did God reject his people? By no means! I am an Israelite myself, a descendant of Abraham, from the tribe of Benjamin. 2 God did not reject his people, whom he foreknew. Don’t you know what Scripture says in the passage about Elijah—how he appealed to God against Israel: 3 “Lord, they have killed your prophets and torn down your altars; I am the only one left, and they are trying to kill me”? 4 And what was God’s answer to him? “I have reserved for myself seven thousand who have not bowed the knee to Baal.” g 5 So too, at the present time there is a remnant chosen by grace. 6 And if by grace, then it cannot be based on works; if it were, grace would no longer be grace.

7 What then? What the people of Israel sought so earnestly they did not obtain. The elect among them did, but the others were hardened, 8 as it is written:

“God gave them a spirit of stupor,

eyes that could not see

and ears that could not hear,

to this very day.” n

9 And David says:

“May their table become a snare and a trap,

a stumbling block and a retribution for them.

10 May their eyes be darkened so they cannot see,

and their backs be bent forever.” p

Ingrafted Branches

- 2 Terms to know
Sovereignty. The word is not found in Scripture. But the concept—that God is free to act as He chooses, without any limits set by the actions of another—is deeply rooted in the biblical concept of God.
Election. The New Testament often uses the term “the elect” or “God’s elect” to identify believers (cf. ; ; ). The Greek words indicate a “choice or selection.” Some Christians believe that election implies God’s choice of who will believe, while others say it implies His choice of those who do believe. See Ephesia ns 1:4, 11.
Richards, L., & Richards, L. O. (1987). The teacher’s commentary (p. 827). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
God has not rejected his people. vs. 1
So too, at the present time there is a remnant chosen by grace .
And if by grace , then it is no longer by works; if it were, grace would no longer be grace .
NIV
Of all the talks given this weekend this is the one which could cause the most disagreement. We must agree that there will be some disagreements.
SLIDE Means of grace are tools that God uses to produce and strengthen faith in a person.
Means of Grace are means of illustrating God’s grace at work.
They are conduits which help us better understand God.
The means of grace are ways in which God works invisibly in disciples, quickening, strengthening and confirming faith.
So, believers use them to open their hearts and lives to God's work in them.
According to John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, the means of grace can be divided into two broad categories, with individual and communal components:
Works of Piety, such as:
Individual Practices--Prayer, Fasting, Searching the Scriptures, Healthy Living
Communal Practices--
Holy Communion
Baptism
Community
Works of Mercy, such as:
Service focused toward individual needs—
Doing Good (Good works)
Visiting the Sick
Visiting the Imprisoned
Feeding & Clothing those in need
Earning, Saving, & Giving all one canService focused toward communal/societal needs--the Seeking of Justice;
Opposition to Slavery
They are not an end in themselves.
They are not means of attaining grace.
Only through Jesus Christ can we obtain such grace.
Means of Grace help us understand real grace.
SLIDE The means of grace are the visual aids God uses in our lives to accomplish the goal of grace, transformation though the atoning work of Jesus Christ.
Real grace which calls people to real holiness.
The means by which we can understand how we can rise above our bankrupt and ruined lives.
Real grace draws us closer to Jesus than ever before.
But so many who claim to be living under grace are not living an experience that is good; they are living an experience that is at best marginal. So many Christians are living beneath their privileges. Why settle for an enhanced experience of death, when we can live an exchanged experience of life? The Christian life is not a modification or improvement of the old, but a transformation into the new life. There is a death to self and sin, and a resurrection into a new life.
SLIDE Prevenient Grace - God is wooing us to himself, and justifying grace - us receiving this marvelous grace that God has to offer.
The means of grace helps us to see that living a consistent life of daily anointing in Christ is ongoing possibility.
The Christian life is the uninhibited response to the gospel, a life that stretches our abilities and imaginations.
Real grace will really change you. Otherwise it is not real grace. The means of grace teaches you the daily object lessons to help you maintain strength to experiences this victorious life in Christ.
The Christian life is the uninhibited response to the gospel, a life that stretches our abilities and imaginations.
The gospel invites us to abundant and eternal living.
It comes to us as our lives are weak, stuck, battered, burdened, broken, and perishing. We are still in a mess, God is watching us, working among us, and weaving even unlikely elements of creation into place to bless us and redeem our misdirected, mistreated lives.
Verse 6 - Mercy
Based upon his understanding of a God of steadfast love, Paul outlines a scenario for the future of his own race in the larger picture of divine redemption.
Works of Piety, such as:Individual Practices--PrayerFastingSearching the ScripturesHealthy LivingCommunal Practices--Holy CommunionBaptismChristian Conferencing (or "community")Works of Mercy, such as:Service focused toward individual needs--Doing Good (Good works)Visiting the SickVisiting the ImprisonedFeeding & Clothing those in needEarning, Saving, & Giving all one canService focused toward communal/societal needs--the Seeking of Justice; Opposition to Slavery
Romans Grafted In -
The Teacher’s Commentary 127: Rom. 9–11—Righteous in History?

Here Paul introduced an aside to his Gentile readers, who might have been feeling superior to the Jews. The company of believers is like an olive tree, Paul suggested. Its roots are Jewish, sunk deeply in Old Testament history and God’s ancient commitment to His chosen people. Gentiles are like branches that have been grafted into this tree. Recognizing this, the Gentile has no cause for pride. Rather we should consider how easy it will be for God to graft back the “natural branches” when the time for regathering comes at last.

Branches Refer to Children of God ---

branches Refers to all who become children of God, both the natural descendants of Abraham and the Gentiles adopted by faith.

A popular pastime today is doing genealogical research. In this day when so many people feel disconnected, it is nice to learn about your ancestors. Some people discover they are related to royalty or historically famous people while others find they are related to more infamous people. I suppose if you do enough research you can find some relatives on each side of that continuum.
In Paul is teaching us about our spiritual roots. He wants us to understand that the nation of Israel is our spiritual ancestor. Our forerunners in the faith were Jews. The disciples were Jews. Jesus was a Jew. We have a connection to the nation of Israel that has an impact on world policy today.

Ingrafted Branches

11 Again I ask: Did they stumble so as to fall beyond recovery? Not at all! Rather, because of their transgression, salvation has come to the Gentiles to make Israel envious. 12 But if their transgression means riches for the world, and their loss means riches for the Gentiles, how much greater riches will their full inclusion bring!

13 I am talking to you Gentiles. Inasmuch as I am the apostle to the Gentiles, I take pride in my ministry 14 in the hope that I may somehow arouse my own people to envy and save some of them. 15 For if their rejection brought reconciliation to the world, what will their acceptance be but life from the dead? 16 If the part of the dough offered as firstfruits is holy, then the whole batch is holy; if the root is holy, so are the branches.

17 If some of the branches have been broken off, and you, though a wild olive shoot, have been grafted in among the others and now share in the nourishing sap from the olive root, 18 do not consider yourself to be superior to those other branches. If you do, consider this: You do not support the root, but the root supports you. 19 You will say then, “Branches were broken off so that I could be grafted in.” 20 Granted. But they were broken off because of unbelief, and you stand by faith. Do not be arrogant, but tremble. 21 For if God did not spare the natural branches, he will not spare you either.

22 Consider therefore the kindness and sternness of God: sternness to those who fell, but kindness to you, provided that you continue in his kindness. Otherwise, you also will be cut off. 23 And if they do not persist in unbelief, they will be grafted in, for God is able to graft them in again. 24 After all, if you were cut out of an olive tree that is wild by nature, and contrary to nature were grafted into a cultivated olive tree, how much more readily will these, the natural branches, be grafted into their own olive tree!

Verse 18 - Be careful not to be prideful -
The Gentiles were evidently displaying some form of pride, but there simply is no basis for this pride. As it already has been pointed out, the branches were dependent upon the roots not vice-a-versa. True, the branches were broken off so that these branches might be inserted, but with such pride, these new branches will be snapped off even quicker (11:18).
A popular pastime today is doing genealogical research. In this day when so many people feel disconnected, it is nice to learn about your ancestors. Some people discover they are related to royalty or historically famous people while others find they are related to more infamous people. I suppose if you do enough research you can find some relatives on each side of that continuum.
In Paul is teaching us about our spiritual roots. He wants us to understand that the nation of Israel is our spiritual ancestor. Our forerunners in the faith were Jews. The disciples were Jews. Jesus was a Jew. We have a connection to the nation of Israel that has an impact on world policy today.
In the early verses of Paul showed us that God has not given up on Israel. God continues to draw some Jewish people to faith by His grace, just as he is doing with non-Jews. There aren’t a lot of Jewish Christians but throughout the history of Israel God has cast off the unfaithful and preserved what was known as a “remnant”. God used this remnant like seed that would yield a harvest of faith in the future. Paul contends that this is God’s plan. God has preserved a remnant of believing Jews who will one day bring a revival in Israel.

branches Refers to all who become children of God, both the natural descendants of Abraham and the Gentiles adopted by faith.

Verse 25-26
The Teacher’s Commentary 127: Rom. 9–11—Righteous in History?

All Israel saved (Rom. 11:25–36). With this said, Paul looked far into the future. He did not want his Gentile brothers and sisters to be conceited, or think that they had won Israel’s promised place. The hardening of Israel is temporary, to last only until “the full number” of Gentiles has come into the church (v. 25). When the time comes, “all Israel will be saved” just as the Old Testament prophets promised (v. 26

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