Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

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Introduction
Jesus Christ is going to be victorious over all the ungodly and evil of this world.
This is the great announcement of the two angels in this passage.
Jesus Christ is going to triumph.
In the last days of human history, He is coming back, and He is going to harvest the earth.
He is going to reap those who believe in Him and take them on to heaven with Him.
But He is going to judge the ungodly and evil of this earth.
Christ and His followers will be vindicated: the world will see and know that Christ is truly the Son of God who came to earth to save man.
The world is going to know …
• that He was well worth forsaking the world and its pleasures and possessions for
• that He was well worth following and standing up for
• that He was well worth even dying for
• that He was well worth denying oneself for
• that He was well worth sacrificing everything for
• that He was well worth suffering persecution for
When Jesus Christ returns in judgment, the world will know that He is exactly who He claimed to be: the Son of God, the Lord and Majesty of the universe.
But it will be too late.
He is returning in judgment.
He came the first time in mercy and grace to save people.
But now, the next time, He returns in glory and majesty to judge the earth.
This is the scene of this passage.
This is the sixth great assurance to believers: the day of harvest is coming.
The Lord God is going to reap the earth.
The believers are going to be taken home to heaven to live with God and Christ forever.
And all the ungodly and evil are to be judged and shut out from God’s presence.
There is to be a perfect world in which nothing reigns but godliness and righteousness.
God is going to create a new heavens and earth, and believers are to have the glorious privilege of living there with God forever and ever.
[Leadership Ministries Worldwide, Revelation, The Preacher’s Outline & Sermon Bible (Chattanooga, TN: Leadership Ministries Worldwide, 1996), 204.]
Main Thought:
Unregenerate humanity faces a terrifying future.
The unrepentant, even after repeated warnings, will learn firsthand the sobering truth that “it is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God” (Heb.
10:31).
Sub-Introduction:
Connecting Context:
The final vision of the chapter clearly points to the finale of the Tribulation, the battle of Armageddon, and Christ’s return in power and wrath.
See II Thessalonians 1:7-10.
[David H. Sorenson, Understanding the Bible, An Independent Baptist Commentary - Hebrews through Revelation, vol.
11, Understanding the Bible, An Independent Baptist Commentary (Northstar Ministries, 2007), 483.]
The battle described here, and the battle of Gog and Magog, described in Revelation 20:8-9, are two separate battles.
This battle will be fought at the close of the Tribulation period.
The battle of Gog and Magog will be fought at the close of the one thousand years’ reign of Jesus.
We will discuss that further when we reach chapter 20.
The battle here is a battle of blood.
The battle in chapter 20 is a battle of fire.
Fire will come down from God out of Heaven and consume the armies of Gog.
[Oliver B. Greene, Revelation, A Verse by Verse Study, Commentaries and Writings of Oliver B. Greene (The Gospel Hour, Inc., 1963), 283.]
Background/Intro Material:
In this chapter, then, we have the fall outline of the dealings of God in the latter-day crisis.
There are seven divisions of it.
First, there is the full remnant of godly Jews associated with the Lamb on mount Sion, in sympathy with His sufferings and waiting for the kingdom.
Secondly, a testimony to the Gentile nations scattered all over the world as well as to those seated on the prophetic earth.
Thirdly, the fall of Babylon.
Fourthly, the fearful doom, both in this world and in the next, of such as should worship the beast and his image, or receive the mark of his name.
Fifthly, the blessedness from that time of those that die in the Lord.
Sixthly, the discriminating process of the harvest.
And seventhly, the awful infliction of vengeance on religious apostacy; the first, at least, of these two last acts of judgment being executed by the Son of man, which necessarily supposes the very close of the age: the wrath, not of God only, but of the Lamb.
...Although it is not about us, yet what a mercy it is to feel that we do not always require to think about ourselves when reading the Bible!
[William Kelly, Lectures on the Book of Revelation (London: T. Weston, 1903), 330.]
I.
The Harvest of Grain By the Reaping of the Son of Man (Rev.
14:14-16).
A. The Son's Description (Rev.
14:14):
1.
He Is Sitting upon a White Cloud.
State Point -
Later, in chapter nineteen, our Lord will be seen sitting upon a white horse.
Horses are seen here also in verse 20.
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