Faithlife Sermons

Luke 8.1-15

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 2 views
Notes
Transcript
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →
Three times a year, as I make my way through my Bible reading plan, I come across the same parable. (A parable is a story that tells a moral truth.) This particular parable is found in , in , and in today’s passage, at the beginning of . Three times a year I know it’s coming; three times a year I think I know what to expect; and three times a year it knocks me on my tail.
It knocks me on my tail because it describes me, in painfully accurate detail, at various points in my life. It describes me as I see myself, and it describes me as I want to be. It’s painful, and it’s wonderful, every time.
As we read before, Jesus is traveling from town to town preaching the good news. And at an undisclosed place, a crowd gathers around him and he tells them a parable about a sower. The sower goes out to sow seed, and he throws it on four different types of ground:
It’s not just a matter of the head, of what we know; it’s a matter of the heart, of our response to what we know.
IS THAT IMPORTANT?

Four Places to Sow

So that being said, let’s go to chapter 8. Jesus is traveling through cities and villages, p
All that being said, let’s start. As we read before, Jesus is traveling from town to town preaching the good news. And at an undisclosed place, a crowd gathers around him and he tells them a parable about a sower. The sower goes out to sow seed, and he throws it on four different types of ground:
s
Soon afterward he went on through cities and villages, proclaiming and bringing the good news of the kingdom of God. And the twelve were with him, and also some women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities: Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, and Joanna, the wife of Chuza, Herod’s household manager, and Susanna, and many others, who provided for them out of their means.
And when a great crowd was gathering and people from town after town came to him, he said in a parable, “A sower went out to sow his seed. And as he sowed, some fell along the path and was trampled underfoot, and the birds of the air devoured it. And some fell on the rock, and as it grew up, it withered away, because it had no moisture. And some fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up with it and choked it. And some fell into good soil and grew and yielded a hundredfold.” As he said these things, he called out, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.”
Now this isn’t the point of this message, but it’d be a shame not to notice this little aside Luke gives; he’s simply moving the story along by giving us some more context. But when he does so, he wants us to notice something incredible: among Jesus’s disciples, who traveled with him, there were also women travelling with him.
The fact that Luke takes the time to mention these women is significant. Women were included among the noteworthy additions to Jesus’s entourage; they were there serving Jesus and the disciples, and out of all of the people following Jesus around, other than his disciples, the only ones Luke mentions by name are these women: Mary, Susanna, and Joanna. This is very interesting coming from a book which is supposedly hostile to women.
End parenthesis.
Let’s keep going. V. 4:
And when a great crowd was gathering and people from town after town came to him, he said in a parable, “A sower went out to sow his seed. And as he sowed, some fell along the path and was trampled underfoot, and the birds of the air devoured it. And some fell on the rock, and as it grew up, it withered away, because it had no moisture. And some fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up with it and choked it. And some fell into good soil and grew and yielded a hundredfold.” As he said these things, he called out, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.”
Now we’ll come back to the details of the parable in a minute—Jesus himself is about to explain it. But first it’s important to point out what the point of the parables were. Often we talk about parables like allegories—they are, like I said before, stories to illustrate a moral or spiritual truth. We say that Jesus spoke in parables to help his listeners understand what he was saying.
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.
Note on women (v. 2)
Note on parables (v. 4)
Quatre terres
He has told parables in this gospel before (3 in , last week in ); but this is the first time Jesus goes further with the function of parables.
Parable = a story that tells a moral truth
MAIN POINTS: The Four Grounds
Luc 8.1-15
Sometimes this is the case: in last week’s passage that’s exactly what happened: he told a story, to help Simon understand what he was saying. And that is nearly always the case for his disciples. We’ll often see Jesus tell a parable to a crowd, and then go explain the parable to his disciples, like he does here.
But think of it from the crowd’s point of view. Jesus tells this story, and he gives them no context for the story. He gives them no explanation. Normally if you want an allegory to be effective, your audience needs to know what images correspond to what realities—C. S. Lewis’s Narnia books work so well because everyone knows that Aslan is a picture of Jesus. But Jesus doesn’t ever clarify his parable for the crowd. Why is that?
Jesus actually tells us why, and his answer will leave us spinning. v. 9:
The parable (v. 4-8)
Trois fois par an, alors que je fais mon plan de lecture de la Bible, je rencontre la même parabole. (Une parabole est une histoire qui illustre une vérité morale.) Cette parabole particulière se trouve dans Matthieu 13, dans Marc 4, et dans notre passage au début de Luc 8. Trois fois par an je sais qu’elle arrive ; trois fois par an je pense que je suis prêt ; et trois fois par an elle me donne une énorme claque.
And when his disciples asked him what this parable meant, 10 he said, “To you it has been given to know the secrets of the kingdom of God, but for others they are in parables, so that ‘seeing they may not see, and hearing they may not understand.’”
Parable = a story that tells a moral truth
Now if you look closely, v. 10 is a mind-numbing statement: by teaching in parables, Jesus is fulfilling the prophecy which says that the Messiah will speak in ways that only God’s children will be able to understand. There’s a lot more we could say about that, but you know what I’m going to say: as enticing as it may be to rush down that rabbit hole, it’s not the point of this text. The point is the parable itself and what it means.
This is one of the hardest truths in the Bible, and it honestly still baffles me: Jesus sovereignly chooses who will understand his parables and who won’t. He speaks in parables because to some it has been given to know the
The confused disciples and the point of parables (v. 9-10)
Jesus has set up the parable speaking about a sower, who goes out to sow seed, and he throws it on four different types of ground:
11 Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God.
He has told parables in this gospel before (3 in , last week in ); but this is the first time Jesus goes further with the function of parables.
, and he throws it on four different types of ground:
ground along a path, where there are lots of birds;
a rock, which has no soil the seed can grab on to;
soil filled with thorns, which chokes the fruit;
and “good soil.”
So he begins to explain his parable, and that’s where we’ll be our whole time today.
11 Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God.
Simple enough. But then he goes on to say that each kind of soil corresponds to a different type of person, and the way they receive the Word of God that they hear. So that’s what we’ll be looking at today.
(I’ll read the verse from the parable first, then I’ll read the corresponding explanation Jesus gives to his disciples.)
So this is where we’ll be the whole time: these four different types of people, and the way they receive the Word of God they hear. (I’ll read the verse from the parable first, then I’ll read the corresponding explanation Jesus gives to his disciples.)

On the Path (v. 5, 11-12)

V. 5:
A sower went out to sow his seed. And as he sowed, some fell along the path and was trampled underfoot, and the birds of the air devoured it… 11 Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God. 12 The ones along the path are those who have heard; then the devil comes and takes away the word from their hearts, so that they may not believe and be saved.
So that’s the image: there are people who hear the Word, but it has no impact at all. It barely has time to get in their ears before the devil comes and plucks it out. They hear the gospel, they go, “Uh-huh,” and they continue on their merry way. Physically speaking, these people have no hearing problems whatsoever; but spiritually speaking, they are deaf.
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.
How many people do we know like this? How many people do you know who have heard the gospel and have not responded at all? How many times did you hear the gospel before you really heard it?
I grew up in church. I had heard the gospel, told in one form or another, thousands of times during my childhood. I heard this very parable taught dozens of times. And it did nothing for me at all. I heard the words, but I didn’t have ears to hear, so although I heard it (at least in an auditory way), I was at that time unable to receive it. And many of you have had the same experience: you went to church all your life, you heard the gospel hundreds of times, and up to a certain point in your life, it did nothing to you.
I say all that because there is a strange reality at play here: although during all that time we were totally unable to receive the gospel when we heard it, we heard it all the same. Someone shared the gospel with us. We sat under the preaching of the Word. God in his sovereignty allowed someone to share the gospel with someone who was totally unable to accept it.
This is what happens in the parable, isn’t it? A sower went out to sow his seed. And as he sowed, some fell along the path and was trampled underfoot, and the birds of the air devoured it. This was before mechanical sowers (semoirs méchaniques): sowers sowed by hand. When they sowed, they didn’t plant individual seeds, but scattered them with a sweep of the hand. They were not meticulous regarding where their seed fell. Most of it landed in the field where the soil was good, but much of it inevitably landed in places it wouldn’t grow.
Here’s the point: we don’t get to pick and choose with whom the gospel is shared. The gospel message is shared indiscriminately, just like it was for us. I don’t know all of you here, and even some of you I do know may well have us all fooled. I don’t stand at the door before I get up to preach and filter through people, saying, “You’ve got ears to hear, and you, but no, not you.” We share with everyone.
And we don’t stop just because some of you will not hear. Some of you will hear the Word, and as soon as it goes in, it will go straight back out again.
The ones along the path are those who have heard; then the devil comes and takes away the word from their hearts, so that they may not believe and be saved.
God. 12 The ones along the path are those who have heard; then the devil comes and takes away the word from their hearts, so that they may not believe and be saved.
I told you this parable was a painful one. It drives us self-examination. So I have to ask: How many of you here this morning have heard the gospel preached…and it just does nothing for you? It just bounces right off, like water off a duck’s back?

On the Rock (v. 6, 13)

v. 12: Those who hear without hearing
Next he turns to another kind of heart, another kind of soil—v. 6:
How many times did you hear the gospel before it hit you?
And some fell on the rock, and as it grew up, it withered away, because it had no moisture… 13 And the ones on the rock are those who, when they hear the word, receive it with joy. But these have no root; they believe for a while, and in time of testing fall away.
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.13 And the ones on the rock are those who, when they hear the word, receive it with joy. But these have no root; they believe for a while, and in time of testing fall away.
13 And the ones on the rock are those who, when they hear the word, receive it with joy. But these have no root; they believe for a while, and in time of testing fall away.
Let me give you a correlative picture of this. When kids are young, they often believe in Santa Claus. If you ask a young child whether or not Santa Claus exists, they will emphatically affirm that absolutely yes, Santa exists! And they’ll look at you like you’re crazy for even suggesting otherwise. This is their time of belief.
How many people do you know who have heard the gospel and have not responded at all?
Then they get a little older, and they start learning about things like gravity, and animals, and matter, and time. They learn that sleighs can’t fly (nor can reindeer), and that one man couldn’t possibly visit all the children of the world in a single night, and that even if he could, he’s too big to fit down a chimney. This is their time of testing.
The strange news: the seed is sown indiscriminately—even amongst those who won't believe.
And when they start comparing what they believed about Santa to what they’ve learned about the world, they eventually relent and stop believing. Why? Because there’s no root there. Belief in Santa is an inconsequential belief that changes nothing about their lives, except maybe for a few minutes once a year. No big loss.
The seed is down indiscriminately—even amongst those who won't believe.
The point of evangelism is that you never know what kind of ground you’ll be sowing: so sow. Indiscriminately. We are equal opportunity evangelists.
This is how many people operate when they hear the gospel. They hear the gospel and receive it with joy—they recognize that this is good news! Let someone else take punishment that I supposedly deserve, so that I won’t be punished? Sure! I’ll take it! Or they’ll hear a version of the gospel that they simply like: “Come to Jesus, and he’ll solve all your problems!” That’s not a hard sell: if you ask anyone, “Do you want your problems to go away?”, not many people will answer, “No thanks.”
Because people on “the path” don’t remain on the path forever; eventually the ground does indeed change—it did for us.
What it all amounts to is that they have heard the gospel (or some semblance of it), they recognize it as good news, but it remains wholly theoretical to them. There’s no root there; it never goes from their head to their heart. And for a while, that doesn’t matter, because the theory alone is enough to please them.
But very quickly, times of testing will come.
“You mean you want me to read this whole book?”
“You want me to talk to someone I can’t see?”
“My friends will think I’m nuts.”
“My family will reject me.”
Or, “I just learned I have cancer. And you want me to add to my struggles and fight temptation too?”
Or again, “They said Jesus would solve all my problems, but they’re all still here.”
It always ends the same: because there is no root there, because they don’t really feel the weight of the gospel, it is so light in their minds that even small trials like reading the Bible or praying, not to mention the greater trials we might meet… None of it seems worth the effort.
So although they seem to be going in the right direction for a while, they fall away.
Intellectual assent is not the same as faith, brothers and sisters. There’s believing, and there’s believing. “I believe love is possible” is not the same as “I believe this woman loves me.” If you believe love is possible, that’s an idea that has nothing to do with you—it’s a theory about the way the world works. But if you believe this particular person loves you, that has a direct impact on you; you’re involved; your heart is engaged; and your love for that person is fed in turn.

Among Thorns (v. 7, 14)

Elle me donne une claque parce qu’elle me décrit, dans des termes très justes, à des moments variés de ma vie. Elle me décrit tel que je suis, et elle me décrit tel que je veux être. C’est douloureux, et c’est merveilleux, à chaque fois.
s
Comme on a lu avant, Jésus voyage de ville en ville, à prêcher la Bonne Nouvelle. Et à un moment, une foule se rassemble autour de lui, et il leur raconte la parabole d’un semeur. Le semeur sort pour semer des graines, et il jète ces graines sur quatre types de terre différents :
The main difference between the two kinds of ground in v. 13-14 is what causes them to fall away.
The next one is similar to the one that came before. But I’d venture to say that this is the place most Christians find themselves today.
And some fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up with it and choked it… 14 And as for what fell among the thorns, they are those who hear, but as they go on their way they are choked by the cares and riches and pleasures of life, and their fruit does not mature.
They hear the gospel and receive it with joy—they recognize that this is good news!
These people are not like those who came before. These people hear the Word, and they accept it, they begin to live it, and even to some degree, they bear fruit. There are things that have changed about their lives. The gospel has landed on their hearts in a real way, they have felt the wonder of God’s grace, and they are changed by it.
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.
14 And as for what fell among the thorns, they are those who hear, but as they go on their way they are choked by the cares and riches and pleasures of life, and their fruit does not mature.
But they don’t even have time for it to make any difference: times of testing come frequently, and can come in many different forms.
Notice that Jesus doesn’t describe them like he did the seed sown on the path, those who don’t believe, or the seed sown on the rock, which falls away. So these are, by all appearances, genuine Christians who have real faith.
“I have to read this whole book?”
But there is still a massive “but” here: their fruit does not mature. Their faith remains small. Their lives are changed, but only just. If they were to look at their lives today, they’d see little discernible difference between their faith today and their faith a year ago, or five years ago, or ten years ago. Or they may even see that they used to bear much fruit; they used to follow Christ with everything they had…but not so much anymore.
Why is that? What causes these people’s “fruit” to not mature? Jesus tells us: as they go on their way they are choked by the cares and riches and pleasures of life.
I’d venture to say that this is where most Christians in our society find themselves today. The fundamental challenge of the Christian life is that when Christ saves us, we become like fish out of water. We are “new creations,” as Paul puts it (). Physiologically, we’re just like everyone else, but spiritually, in our souls, we’re no longer even of the same species. And yet we’re called to live in the same world as before, surrounded by the same people, the same temptations, the same troubles…
And living as we do in this world, it’s hard for us to remember that we are new creations.
We have a living hope in Christ, yes…but it’s hard to remember that when you spend all day long throw up because you’re undergoing chemotherapy.
We have all we need in Christ, yes…but it’s hard to remember that when we’re unable to pay the bills. (Or, for that matter, when we have the opportunity to make a good deal more money than we used to.)
We have new desires, yes…but it’s hard to remember why these things he calls us to desire are so important when we are still single after all this time and all we really want is to love someone and be loved by them.
It’s hard to remember these things when we suddenly have the opportunity to have something we’ve always wanted.
The seed is sown, and it starts to bear fruit, but we become so distracted by the cares and riches and pleasures of this life that we tend to that fruit only very little; and it never matures. Our spiritual lives are, quite literally, choked by the things we love.
We live in the most distracting period of history in one of the richest countries in the world. For most of us, we can have or buy virtually anything we can imagine; and if we don’t have it ourselves, we can at least distract ourselves by seeing it on TV and pretending for an hour or so that we do.
Brothers and sisters, we all reach a point when it becomes hard to prioritize between the things we love and the One we’re meant to love. There are so many things we want that it becomes difficult to remember we should be wanting something more. There are so many treasures to be had that we have a hard time believing that Jesus really is better.
What’s the alternative to these three soils? Jesus tells us in v. 8 and 15.

The Good Soil (v. 8, 15)

And some fell into good soil and grew and yielded a hundredfold… 15 As for that in the good soil, they are those who, hearing the word, hold it fast in an honest and good heart, and bear fruit with patience.
15 As for that in the good soil, they are those who, hearing the word, hold it fast in an honest and good heart, and bear fruit with patience.
If you look closely at what he says, you’ll see that there are two things that make this “good soil” good: the first is an honest and good heart.
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.
The Greek is a bit ambiguous here, because both words (“honest” and “good”) can mean “good.” The reason they’re translated this way is because it gets the subtlety across that people like this have good hearts, and they show it. What you see is what you get: the good in them comes out in their lives.
So what does that look like? What does it mean to be “good”? Well, Jesus has already addressed that, hasn’t he? Earlier in chapter six he used this same language—with these same two words. Chapter 6, verses 43-45:
For no good tree bears bad fruit, nor again does a bad tree bear good fruit... 45 The good person out of the good treasure of his heart produces good…
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.
Remember? It is only when we love what we should love that we are able to truly do what God calls us to do. It is only when we love the right treasure that we are able to bear good fruit. So an honest and good heart is a heart which has the right treasure. It is a heart which loves the right thing, which is firmly and unwaveringly set on God, and acts out of that love.
“Talking to someone who isn’t there is weird.
“My friends will think I’m crazy.”
“My family will reject me.”
OR:
“I just learned I have cancer. And you want me to add to my struggles and fight temptation? Sorry—this is too much.”
I’d venture to say that this is the place most Christians find themselves today.
“In a time of testing [they] fall away.”
• sur un chemin, où il y a des oiseaux ;
v. 14: Those hear, begin to bear fruit, and find their fruit choked by “the cares and riches and pleasures of life.”
So when these people hear the Word, they don’t endure it like they would a root canal, knowing that that’s what Christians are supposed to do; they hold it fast because they know it comes from the One they love more than anything.
This one goes a little further. They hear and begin to bear fruit, but “their fruit does not mature.”
The second thing that makes this “good soil” good is endurance. These people hear the word…and bear fruit with patience. (It’s the same word as, for example, in .)
Why? Because although they have heard the Word and seem to have received it (they have manifested some growth in spiritual things), “as they go on their way they are choked by the cares and riches and pleasures of life”.
as they go on their way they are choked by the cares and riches and pleasures of life.”
These people know it’s hard; they feel that it’s hard; they live in this world, and they meet all the same trials and pleasures and temptations as anyone else. But they know what treasure awaits them; they know what is truly valuable; so they don’t let themselves get distracted. They push through. They ignore the neon signs along the side of the road, begging for their attention, and with laser-like focus, they press on toward the goal.
Think of those who have grown up in church...
Anon, 2016. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.
The simple fact is that bearing fruit takes time. That’s why this is such a good image: have you ever seen a plant whict pops up overnight with ripe fruit hanging off its branches? That might exist, but there aren’t many plants like that; most plants take a long time to go from seed to fully-grown, fruit-bearing plant. Brothers and sisters, this takes time. Our call is not to become Christians and then to suddenly be fully-functioning missionary geniuses. Our call is to grow. To hear the Word, to hold it fast in an honest and good heart, and to bear fruit with patience.
And if our faith is genuine—if the Holy Spirit has done this work in us—then this is the kind of Christian we will become. This is the kind of Christian that the parables are meant for; this is the kind of Christian “who has ears to hear,” and so hears.
v. 15: Those who hear “the word, hold it fast in an honest and good heart, and bear fruit with patience.”
• sur un sol pierreux, où il n’y a pas de terre profonde ;
What does it mean to have an “honest and good heart?” (Gk. words both seem to mean “good”—1st in a general way, 2nd in a way suggesting health or kindness.)
cf. —the good person out of the good treasure of his heart produces good.
What does perseverance have to do with it?
How do trials, cares and riches and pleasures, or deaf ears, keep us from an honest and good heart? Keep us from persevering?
Those with this kind of heart are those for whom these parables are intended (cf. v. 10).

Which Soil Are You?

I told you this parable was a painful one. Jesus presents us with four different types of people, and although he never asks the question directly, the obvious question you can’t help asking when you hear it, is Which type am I?
15 As for that in the good soil, they are those who, hearing the word, hold it fast in an honest and good heart, and bear fruit with patience.
• sur une terre dans laquelle il y a des ronces, qui étouffent la plante ;
So which type are you this morning?
How many of you here have heard the gospel preached…and it does nothing for you? It just bounces right off, like water off a duck’s back? If that’s you, then you need to realize that naturally, that’s what happens for all of us. Not a person in this room didn’t have a point in their lives when that wasn’t their reaction to the gospel. So you’re in good company. But if that is how you’re reacting to the gospel today, then you need to recognize that; you need to know it, and you need to admit it.
Or how many of you have heard the gospel, and like the idea of the gospel, but find it sticking in your brain rather than making the trip down to your heart? I know that’s a hard question to answer—it’s awfully subjective—so here’s a test. What do you feel when you consider what the gospel says?
How do you feel when you are told that you are a sinner, that you have rebelled against a holy and loving God? Is there any remorse? Is there any sorrow? Does the idea that you have wounded God hurt you?
How do you feel when you are told that Jesus took on the punishment of your sins for you, and gave you his righteousness? What is your first impulse? Is there any joy? Is there any gratitude? What does that knowledge make you want to do?
How do you feel when you hear about who God is? when you are told of his wisdom and his love and his omniscience and his power and his sovereignty? If you saw him rightly, you’d feel wonder, and fear, at the idea of who God is. But many people, when they think about God, feel little more excitement than they’d feel watching an interesting insect under a microscope.
Or how many of you, if you look at your faith today, if you look at the lives you live for Jesus today, can see little discernible difference between where you were a year ago and where you are today? How many of you love the same things you’ve always loved, and have the same small love for Jesus you had at the beginning?
I doubt that even the most honest and holy Christian could look at him- or herself today and say without hesitation, “I’m the good soil.” That’s not in itself a bad sign—the holier we become, the more we realize how unholy we are. The reality of all of our lives is that we’re all still growing. We hope to be this good soil, and many of us may be more like that than we think. But we’re not there yet. We still have hearts which love what we shouldn’t love, which are distracted rather than fully engaged.
So given that reality, no matter in what situation we find ourselves, no matter which “soil” you think you are, there are three things we all need to do:
Firstly, we need to pray. You may well know what kind of person you are today; you may be able to rightly discern the state of your heart. And if you’re like me, it’s very possible that after this parable you’re feeling the weight of how far you still have to go. Here’s the important thing: you may know what kind of soil you are today…but you don’t yet know what kind of soil you will be.
So pray. Pray that God would sovereignly change your heart; that he would cause you to love him and love holiness and hate sin and its effects; that he would fix your eyes on the treasure he is, and actually make you desire it like he said he would, and cause those new loves to work their way out in your lives. Pray that he would cause you to hold fast his Word in an honest and good heart.
Secondly, we need to persevere. It’s twisted but true: so many Christians will only act in obedience when they’re in the mood. But the truth is that there are times when we won’t want to obey, we won’t want to discipline ourselves; we won’t want to act in humility, or out of love, or to serve others. And brothers and sisters, it doesn’t matter. We are not just called to obey when we want to; we are called to obey. Motivation is important; our desires are important; but sometimes God allows us to not feel like doing it, so that we might learn the discipline of doing it anyway.
So if you know what to do, then do it—even if you don’t want to. And if you don’t know what to do, then ask. Ask your brothers and sisters for help. Or (I promise, it works!) read the Bible. More than likely the answer’s in there. Whatever he tells you to do, do it, and pray he helps you to do it for the right reason. Bear fruit with patience. Persevere.
Thirdly, we need to proclaim the gospel. The entire image of this parable is wrapped up in that of a sower going out to sow. And he sows indiscriminately. We don’t pick and choose our listeners; we don’t gauge the probability that people will respond well before saying what needs to be said. We proclaim the gospel, and let God worry about who will respond in what way.
Because as anyone who lives like this will tell you, God in his grace makes it so that when we share the gospel, we are changed, regardless of how they respond. Fewer things are able to stir our affections for Christ, to make us love him more, to make us want to know him better, than having a simple conversation about Jesus with someone who doesn’t know him. We need to proclaim the gospel.
Lastly, we need to preach this parable to ourselves. Please don’t leave this parable in your seats when we’re done here; take it home with you, and go back over it, as often as you need to.
s
24 Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one receives the prize? So run that you may obtain it. 25 Every athlete exercises self-control in all things. They do it to receive a perishable wreath, but we an imperishable. 26 So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air. 27 But I discipline my body and keep it under control, lest after preaching to others I myself should be disqualified.
PRAY. You may know what kind of ground you are today… But you don’t yet know what kind of ground you will be.
Pray continually that God makes you the kind of ground that hears the word, holds it fast, and bears fruit.
If our faith is genuine—if the Holy Spirit has done this work in us—then what Jesus says in v. 10 to his disciples, he’s saying to you.
SOW. The great mystery here is that those in whom the Word is sown are called to sow the Word in others.
Jesus gets to decide in whom the Word will bear fruit (cf. v. 10), and in whom it won’t. We have no such right.
“To you it has been given to know the secrets of the kingdom of God, but for others they are in parables, so that ‘seeing they may not see, and hearing they may not understand.’”
We are to share the gospel indiscriminately, because we never know which kind of ground we’re dealing with.
We are called to sow, and we may sow with confidence, trusting that God does the work necessary to cause us to be “good soil”, to cause us to “bear fruit.”
• et sur « la bonne terre. »
In allowing us to be cut to the heart by this parable, he is giving us a grace that he hasn’t given to everyone. He’s telling us what kind of Christian he wants us to be, and if we have been given faith by his Spirit, this is the kind of Christian we will become. This “good soil” is the kind of Christian that the parables are meant for; this is the kind of Christian “who has ears to hear,” and so hears.
this is the kind of Christian we will become. This “good soil” is the kind of Christian that the parables are meant for; this is the kind of Christian “who has ears to hear,” and so hears.
But don’t neglect to see the grace in the call Jesus makes in v. 8: “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” Calvinists can tend toward passivity; because we believe God does this in us, we sit back and wait for him to do it. But the call of Jesus is active: “If you have ears to hear, then hear. LISTEN! Consider these things! See where you are, and where you need to be, and move toward that.” The Christian life is hearing the words of God and applying them to our lives—over, and over, and over again.
Lastly: if our faith is genuine—if the Holy Spirit has done this work in us—then this is the kind of Christian we will become. This is the kind of Christian that the parables are meant for; this is the kind of Christian “who has ears to hear,” and so hears.
Alors ses disciples ne comprennent pas sa parabole, et Jésus la leur explique. On sera du coup dans son explication aujourd’hui. (Je lirai des versets de la parabole d’abord, et puis je lirai les explications correspondantes que Jésus donne à ses disciples.)
Jesus gives us the call to hear his words, and when we obey that call, he works the miracle in us. Pray. Persevere. And don’t stop listening to his voice.
But don’t neglect to see the grace in the call: “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” Calvinists can tend toward passivity; because we believe God does this in us, we sit back and wait for him to do it. But the call of Jesus is active: “If you have ears to hear, then hear. LISTEN! Consider these things! See where you are, and where you need to be, and move toward that.” The call begets the miracle.
Le chemin (v. 5, 11-12)
V. 5:
5 Un semeur sortit pour semer sa semence. Comme il semait, une partie de la semence tomba le long du chemin; elle fut piétinée et les oiseaux du ciel la mangèrent… “11Voici ce que signifie cette parabole: la semence, c’est la parole de Dieu. 12Ceux qui sont le long du chemin, ce sont ceux qui entendent; puis le diable vient et enlève la parole de leur cœur, de peur qu’ils ne croient et soient sauvés.
Alors voilà l’image : il y a des gens qui lisent la Parole, mais sur qui elle n’a aucun impact. Elle a à peine le temps d’entrer dans leurs oreilles avant que le diable arrive pour l’enlever. Ils entendent l’évangile, ils font : « OK, » et puis il continue leur chemin. Physiquement parlant, ces gens n’ont aucun problème d’audition ; mais spirituellement parlant, ils sont sourds.
Combien de personnes connaissons-nous qui sont comme ça ? Combien de nos amis ont entendu l’évangile sans y répondre ? Combien de fois avez-vous entendu l’évangile avant de l’entendre vraiment ?
J’ai grandi dans l’église. J’avais entendu l’évangile, raconté d’une manière ou d’une autre, des milliers de fois pendant mon enfance. Et il ne m’a rien fait. J’ai entendu les mots, mais je n’avais pas les oreilles pour entendre, alors même si je l’avais entendu (au moins de manière auditive), j’étais incapable de le recevoir. Et plusieurs d’entre vous ont fait la même expérience : vous allez à l’église depuis toute votre vie, vous avez entendu l’évangile des centaines de fois, et jusqu’à un certain point dans votre vie, ça ne vous a rien fait.
Je dis tout cela parce qu’il y a une réalité étrange à l’œuvre ici : même si pendant tout ce temps nous étions totalement incapables de recevoir l’évangile quand nous l’entendions, nous l’entendions quand même. Quelqu’un a quand même partagé l’évangile avec nous. Nous avons entendu l’évangile prêché. Dieu dans sa souveraineté a permis à quelqu’un de partager l’évangile avec des gens qui étaient totalement incapables de le recevoir.
C’est ce qui arrive dans la parabole. Un semeur sortit pour semer sa semence. Comme il semait, une partie de la semence tomba le long du chemin; elle fut piétinée et les oiseaux du ciel la mangèrent. C’était avant des semoirs mécaniques : les semeurs semaient à la main. Quand ils semaient, ils ne plantaient pas les graines individuellement, mais les éparpillaient d’un revers de main. Ils n’étaient pas très méticuleux concernant où les graines tombaient. La plupart des graines tombaient dans la bonne terre, mais inévitablement, certaines tombaient dans des endroits où elles ne pouvaient pas pousser.
Voici le message : nous ne choisissons pas avec qui nous partageons l’évangile. Le message de l’évangile est partagé de manière inconditionnelle, comme il l’a été pour nous. Je ne vous connais pas tous ici ; il y a certaines personnes ici qui vont entendre tout ce que je dis, et dès que le message entre dans une oreille, il va ressortir par l’autre. Même certains d’entre vous que je connais sont peut-être comme ça, et je l’ignore. Mais je ne me tiens pas à la porte avant de prêcher pour filtrer les gens, en disant : « Toi, tu as des oreilles pour entendre, et toi, mais pas toi. » Nous partageons avec tous.
La terre pierreuse (v. 6, 13)
Ensuite Jésus se tourne vers un autre type de cœur, un autre type de terre—v. 6 :
6 Une autre partie tomba sur un sol pierreux; quand elle eut poussé, elle sécha, parce qu’elle manquait d’humidité 13 Ceux qui sont sur le sol pierreux, ce sont ceux qui, lorsqu’ils entendent la parole, l’acceptent avec joie; mais ils n’ont pas de racine, ils croient pour un temps et abandonnent au moment de l’épreuve.
Laissez-moi vous donner une autre image. Quand les enfants sont jeunes, ils croient souvent au Père Noël. Demandez à un petit enfant si le Père Noël existe, et il affirmera qu’absolument oui, le Père Noël existe ! Et il te regardera comme un malade pour avoir suggéré autrement. C’est leur moment de croire.
Puis ils grandissent un peu, et ils commencent à apprendre des choses sur la gravité, et les animaux, et la matière, et le temps. Ils apprennent que les traineaux ne peuvent pas voler (ni les rennes), qu’un homme ne pourrait jamais visiter tous les enfants du monde le temps d’une seule nuit, et même s’il pouvait le faire, il est trop gros pour passer dans le trou d’un cheminée. C’est leur moment d’épreuve.
Et quand ils commencent à comparer ce qu’ils croyaient sur le Père Noël à ce qu’ils ont appris sur le monde, éventuellement ils arrêtent de croire. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’il n’y a aucune racine à cette croyance. La croyance dans le Père Noël est sans conséquence ; elle ne change rien dans leurs vies, sauf peut-être pendant quelques minutes, une fois par an.
C’est ainsi que beaucoup de gens fonctionnent quand ils entendent l’évangile. Ils entendent l’évangile et le reçoivent avec joie—ils reconnaissent que c’est une bonne nouvelle ! Laisser quelqu’un prendre la punition que je mérite (apparemment), pour ne pas que je sois puni ? Allez ! Je prends ! Ou alors, ils entendent une version de l’évangile qu’ils aiment : « Venez à Jésus et il vous donnera tout ce que vous désirez ! » C’est vendeur, ça—dis à quelqu’un que Jésus résoudra tous leurs problèmes, il n’y a pas grand monde qui refuserait ça.
Ils entendent l’évangile (ou une version de l’évangile), ils le reconnaissent comme une bonne nouvelle, mais il reste entièrement théorique. Il n’y a aucune racine là ; le message ne fait jamais le trajet entre la tête et le cœur. Et pendant un peu de temps, ça ne fait rien, parce que la théorie elle-même suffit pour leur plaire.
Mais rapidement, ils arrivent à un temps d’épreuve.
« Tu veux que je lise tout ce bouquin ? »
« Tu veux que je parle à quelqu’un que je ne vois pas ? »
« Mes amis vont penser que je suis fou ! »
« Ma famille va me rejeter ! »
Ou alors :
« Je viens d’apprendre que j’ai un cancer. Et tu veux que j’ajoute à toutes mes luttes, et que je résiste en plus à la tentation ? »
Ou encore :
« Ils m’ont dit que Jésus résoudrait mes problèmes, mais tous mes problèmes sont encore là. »
Ça finit toujours pareil : puisqu’il n’y a aucune racine, puisque ils ne ressentent pas le poids de l’évangile, il reste tellement léger dans leurs esprits que même les petites épreuves comme la lecture de la Bible et la prière, sans même parler des plus grandes épreuves qu’on peut raconter… La récompense ne semble pas être à la hauteur des efforts qu’il faut.
Alors même s’ils semblent aller dans le bon sens pendant un temps, ils finissent par y renoncer.
Parmi les ronces (v. 7, 14)
7Une autre partie tomba au milieu des ronces; les ronces poussèrent avec elle et l’étouffèrent… 14Ce qui est tombé parmi les ronces, ce sont ceux qui ont entendu la parole, mais en cours de route ils la laissent étouffer par les préoccupations, les richesses et les plaisirs de la vie, et ils ne parviennent pas à maturité.
Ces gens ne sont pas comme ceux dont on a parlé avant. Ces gens entendent la Parole, et ils l’acceptent. Ils commencent à la mettre en pratique, et jusqu’à un certain point, ils portent du fruit. Remarquez bien que Jésus ne les décrit pas comme il l’a fait pour la semence semée sur le chemin, qui ne croient pas, ou sur le terrain pierreux, qui abandonnent. Il s’agit, de toute apparence, de vrais chrétiens qui ont une vraie foi.
Mais—leur fruit ne parvient pas à la maturité. Leur foi reste petite. Leurs vies sont changées, mais tout juste. S’ils regardaient bien à leurs vies d’aujourd’hui, ils verraient très peu de différence entre leur foi d’aujourd’hui et leur foi d’il y a un an, ou cinq ans, ou dix ans. Ou peut-être même qu’ils portaient beaucoup de fruit avant ; ils suivaient ardemment Jésus avant…mais plus tellement maintenant.
Pourquoi ? Qu’est-ce qui fait que le « fruit » de ces gens ne parvient pas à la maturité ? Jésus nous le dit : en cours de route ils la laissent étouffer par les préoccupations, les richesses et les plaisirs de la vie.
J’irais jusqu’à dire que c’est là où se trouvent la plupart des chrétiens dans notre société aujourd’hui. Le défi fondamental de la vie chrétienne est que lorsque Jésus nous sauve, nous devenons comme des poissons qui vivent sur la terre. Nous sommes des « nouvelles créatures, » comme Paul le dit (2 Cor. 5.17). De manière physiologique, nous sommes comme tout le monde ; mais de manière spirituelle, dans nos âmes, nous ne sommes plus de la même espèce. Mais en même temps, nous sommes appelés à vivre dans le même monde qu’avant, entourés des mêmes personnes, avec les mêmes tentations et les mêmes difficultés…
Et quand on vit dans un monde déchu, il nous est très facile d’oublier que nous sommes de nouvelles créatures.
Tu as en Christ une espérance vivante, oui…mais c’est dur de te souvenir de ça quand tu passes toute la journée à vomir parce que tu subis une chimiothérapie.
Tu as en Christ tout ce qu’il te faut, oui…mais c’est dur de te souvenir de ça quand tu es incapable de payer tes factures. (Ou alors, quand tu as l’opportunité de gagner bien plus d’argent qu’avant.)
Tu as de nouveaux désirs, oui…mais c’est dur de te concentrer sur ces nouveaux désirs quand tu es toujours célibataire depuis tout ce temps.
La semence est semée, et elle commence à porter du fruit… Mais nous devenons tellement distraits par les préoccupations et les richesses et les plaisirs de cette vie que nous négligeons de prendre soin de ce fruit, et il n’arrive jamais à la maturité. Nos vies spirituelles sont, littéralement, étouffées par les choses que nous aimons.
Nous vivons dans la période la plus distrayante de l’histoire, dans un des pays les plus riches au monde. Pour la plupart d’entre nous, nous pouvons avoir ou acheter presque tout ce qu’on peut imaginer, ou au moins nous distraire en voyant ce qu’on veut et en faisant semblant de l’avoir pendant une heure devant la télé.
Frères et sœurs, nous arriverons tous à un moment où on aura du mal à prioritiser entre les choses qu’on aime et Celui qu’on est appelés à aimer. On désire tellement de choses que c’est difficile de nous souvenir qu’on devrait désirer quelque chose encore plus. Il y a tellement de trésors à avoir que nous avons du mal à croire que Jésus est vraiment meilleur. Et tant qu’on reste coincés entre Dieu et toutes ces autres choses, notre foi ne parvient jamais à la maturité.
Alors on a trois terres—sur le chemin, sur la pierre, et parmi les ronce. Aucune de ces trois n’est bonne.
Quel est donc l’alternatif ? Jésus nous le dit dans les v. 8 et 15.
La bonne terre (v. 8, 15)
8Une autre partie tomba dans la bonne terre; quand elle eut poussé, elle produisit du fruit au centuple… 15Ce qui est tombé dans la bonne terre, ce sont ceux qui ont entendu la parole avec un cœur honnête et bon, la retiennent et portent du fruit avec persévérance.
Si vous regardez de près à ce qu’il dit, vous verrez qu’il y a deux choses qui font que cette « bonne terre » soit bonne : la première, c’est un cœur honnête et bon, dans lequel on retient la Parole qu’on entend.
Ces deux mots en grec (« honnête » et « bon ») peuvent être traduits par « bon. » Ils l’ont traduit ainsi parce que cela communique une subtilité que le grec communique bien : ces personnes ont de bons cœurs, et ils le manifestent. Ce qu’on voit, c’est ce qu’ils ont à l’intérieur—le bon à l’intérieur se manifeste dans leurs vies.
Alors à quoi cela ressemble ? Qu’est-ce que ça veut dire d’avoir un « bon » cœur, et comment cela se manifeste-il ? Et bien, Jésus l’a déjà dit, n’est-ce pas ? Plus tôt, dans le chapitre 6, il se sert du même langage—avec ces deux mêmes mots. Chapitre 6, v. 43 et45 :
43Un bon arbre ne porte pas de mauvais fruits ni un mauvais arbre de bons fruits… 45L’homme bon tire de bonnes choses du bon trésor de son cœur, et celui qui est mauvais tire de mauvaises choses du mauvais [trésor de son cœur].
Vous vous souvenez de ce qu’on a vu il y a quelques semaines ? Ce n’est que lorsque nous aimons ce que nous devrions aimer que nous sommes pleinement capables de faire ce que Dieu nous appelle à faire. Ce n’est que lorsque nous aimons le bon trésor que nous sommes capables de porter du bon fruit. Alors un cœur honnête et bon, c’est un cœur qui a le bon trésor, qui est fermement attaché à Dieu, et qui agit à partir de cet amour pour lui.
Si vous voulez un exemple de ce à quoi ça ressemble, pensez à la femme pécheresse qu’on a vu dimanche dernier dans Luc 7.36-50. Elle a entendu Jésus prêcher ; elle l’a entendu appeler les pécheurs « pécheurs. » Elle n’est pas offensée par ça ; elle le reconnaît comme vrai. Elle est brisée par son péché, et attirée vers le pardon qu’elle sait Jésus lui donne. Et puisqu’elle a été pardonnée de nombreux péchés, elle aime beaucoup. Et on a vu cette réalité se manifester dans une démonstration extrêmement honnête, extrêmement brute de son amour pour Jésus ; ce qui est dans son cœur est bon, et il se manifeste de la manière la plus claire possible.
Lorsque de telles personnes entendent la Parole, elles ne la subissent pas comme une visite chez le dentiste ; elles la retiennent comme un trésor, parce qu’elle savent que cette Parole vient de Celui qu’elles aiment plus que tout.
La deuxième chose qui fait que cette « bonne terre » soit bonne, c’est la persévérance. Ces gens entendent la parole…et portent du fruit avec persévérance.
Ces gens savent que la vie chrétienne est difficile ; ils vivent dans ce monde, et ils rencontre les mêmes épreuves et les mêmes plaisirs et les mêmes tentations que tout le monde. Mais ils savent quel trésor les attend ; ils savent ce qui est vraiment valable ; et ils ne se laissent pas distraire. Ils persistent. Ils ignorent les publicité en néon qui demandent leur attention, et avec une concentration aiguisée, ils courent vers le but.
Frères et sœurs, porter du fruit, ça prend du temps. C’est pour cela que cette image est tellement bonne : avez-vous déjà vu une plante qui poussent en une nuit, avec des fruits murs qui sont là dès le matin ? Ça existe peut-être, mais si ça existe, c’est rare ; la plupart des plantes prennent du temps pour passer d’une graine à une plante adulte qui porte du fruit. C’est un long processus. Dieu ne s’attend pas à ce que nous soyons des génies missionnaires totalement murs juste après qu’il nous donne la foi. Il s’attend à ce que nous grandissions, à ce que nous entendions la Parole, que nous la retenions dans un cœur honnête et bon, et que nous portions du fruit avec persévérance.
Quelle terre êtes-vous ?
Je vous ai dit que cette parabole était douloureuse (au moins c’est le cas pour moi). Jésus nous présente quatre types de personnes différent à travers l’image de quatre types de terre différent, et la question implicite qu’il nous demande, et que du coup je dois vous demander ce matin, c’est : « Quel terre êtes-vous ? »
Certains d’entre vous ont déjà entendu l’évangile prêché…et ça ne vous fait rien. Vous entendez l’évangile, et il ressort aussi rapidement, comme un ricochet. Ça ne fait rien pour vous, et ne vous intéresse pas du tout. Si c’est vous, alors il faut réaliser que naturellement, c’est ainsi pour nous tous. Personne dans cette salle n’a eu une période de leurs vies où ce rejet n’était pas leur réaction à l’évangile. Alors vous êtes en bonne compagnie. Mais si c’est ainsi que vous réagissez à l’évangile aujourd’hui, alors il faut dire les choses telles qu’elles sont ; il faut reconnaître cela, et savoir que selon la Bible en tout cas, vous êtes perdus.
Pour d’autres, vous avez entendu l’évangile, et vous aimez l’idée de l’évangile, mais vous il est coincé dans votre esprit plutôt que de faire le trajet jusqu’à votre cœur. Quand la Bible vous dit que vous êtes pécheur, que vous vous êtes rebellés contre un Dieu saint et aimant, vous ne ressentez aucun vrai remords, aucune vraie tristesse. La connaissance de qui vous êtes, et de qui Dieu est, et de ce qu’il a fait pour vous, ne vous donne pas envie de faire quoi que ce soit en réponse ; vous considérez ce que vous avez, et ce que vous pensez perdre en suivant Jésus, et vous vous dites : « Je suis prêt à le suivre jusque , mais tout le reste…non. » L’idée de Jésus vous plaît bien, mais il n’y a aucune racine là—la moindre épreuve, et vous n’hésiterez pas à le laisser tomber.
Pour d’autres, si vous regardez à votre foi aujourd’hui, vous ne voyez que très peu de différence entre là où vous étiez il y a un an et là où vous êtes aujourd’hui. Vous aimez les mêmes choses que vous avez toujours aimé, et vous avez le même petit amour pour Jésus qu’au début. Vous voyez un changement dans votre vie, oui, et vous savez que Dieu a fait quelque chose en vous ; mais vous ne grandissez pas. Vous êtes le même chrétien adolescent que vous étiez avant.
Si vous êtes dans un de ces trois cas de figure, ne désespérez pas. Je ne crois pas que Jésus nous a donné le quatrième exemple de la « bonne terre » pour que nous disions : « Sans aucun doute, ça, c’est moi. » Je doute fort que même le chrétien le plus saint pourrait honnêtement se regarder et dire sans hésitation : « Je suis la bonne terre. » Tout chrétien mur dans sa foi vous dirait que plus on devient saint, et plus on réalise à quel point on n’est pas saint ; plus on grandit en maturité, et plus on réalise à quel point on est encore immature. Nous grandissons tous encore. Nous espérons devenir cette bonne terre, et plusieurs d’entre nous sont plus murs qu’on imagine. Mais on n’est pas encore arrivés. On a encore des cœurs qui aiment ce qu’ils ne devraient pas aimer, qui sont parfois distraits plutôt que pleinement engagés.
Alors étant donné cette réalité, peu importe dans quelle situation on se trouve, peu importe quelle « terre » vous pensez être, il y a quatre choses que nous devons tous faire :
D’abord, nous devons prier. Vous savez peut-être bien quel type de personne vous êtes aujourd’hui ; vous êtes peut-être capable de bien discerner l’état de votre cœur. Et si vous êtes comme moi, après avoir entendu cette parabole vous ressentez bien tout ce qu’il reste à faire.
Alors priez. Priez que Dieu change souverainement votre cœur ; qu’il vous fasse l’aimer, lui, et aimer la sainteté et détester le péché et ses effets ; qu’il fixe vos yeux sur le trésor qu’il est, et vous fasse désirer ce trésor comme il a promis, qu’il fasse que votre amour pour lui se manifeste dans vos vies. Priez qu’il vous aide à retenir fermement sa Parole dans un cœur bon et honnête.
Deuxièmement, nous devons persévérer. Après avoir prié que Dieu nous change, nous devons nous mettre au travail et obéir. Tellement de chrétiens vont prier et attendre. Tellement de chrétiens n’obéissent que lorsqu’ils n’ont pas la flemme de le faire ! Nous arrivons devant une tentation, et nous ne ressentons pas Dieu travailler en nous, alors nous disons que c’est inutile et nous cédons à la tentation jusqu’à ce qu’on ressente Dieu faire quelque chose. Mais ce qui fait que la bonne terre soit bonne n’est pas seulement la bonne motivation ; c’est la persévérance dans l’obéissance à la Parole. C’est porter du fruit avec persévérance.
Alors obéissez-le, même si vous n’avez pas envie de le faire. Priez qu’il vous aide à vouloir obéir…et puis obéissez, même si vous n’en avez pas envie. Faites-lui confiance qu’il est bien en train de changer votre cœur, même si vous ne le ressentez pas, et obéissez-lui comme si vous n’avez jamais rien voulu d’autre. Persévérez.
Dernièrement, nous devons prêcher cette parabole à nous-mêmes. Ne laissez pas cette parabole dans vos sièges quand on est terminés ici ; ramenez-la à la maison, et retournez-y, aussi souvent que nécessaire. Cette parabole nous oblige à nous examiner nous-mêmes—alors examinez-vous à la lumière de ce qu’elle nous dit.
Où est-ce que je me trouve dans cette parabole ? On a vu ce qui empêchait les trois premiers exemples à être la « bonne terre »—alors examinez-vous pour ces mêmes choses. Quelles épreuves me distraient ? Quels plaisirs étouffent mon affection pour Christ ? Quelles préoccupations ? Quelles tentations ?
Je sais que pour certains d’entre vous, vous restez encore sur votre faim concernant le v. 10. Quand les disciples viennent à Jésus pour lui demander une explication de sa parabole, il répond : Il vous a été donné, à vous, de connaître les mystères du royaume de Dieu; mais pour les autres, cela est dit en paraboles, afin qu’en voyant ils ne voient pas et qu’en entendant ils ne comprennent pas. Je sais que vous voulez que je me lance dans un discours de la doctrine calviniste—et c’est vrai, ce que Jésus dit y figure bien.
Mais encore, la souveraineté de Dieu sur le salut n’est pas le message central de ce qu’il dit. Jésus dit ce qu’il dit aux disciples pour qu’ils soient reconnaissants d’avoir la grâce à comprendre. Il faut bien le savoir : en nous décrivant dans cette parabole, Dieu nous donne une grâce qu’il n’a pas donné à tout le monde. Il nous dit quel type de chrétien il veut qu’on soit, et s’il nous a donné la foi par son Esprit, c’est le type de chrétien que nous allons devenir. Cette « bonne terre », c’est le type de chrétien pour qui ces paraboles existent.
Mais négligeons pas de voir la grâce dans l’appel que Jésus fait dans le v. 8 : « Que celui qui a des oreilles pour entendre entende. » Encore, ne restez pas là à attendre à « ressentir » quelque chose. L’appel de Jésus dépend de l’œuvre de l’Esprit, oui—mais il est actif : « Si vous avez des oreilles pour entendre, entendez. Si l’Esprit vous a donné la foi, écoutez ! Considérez ces choses ! Considérez là où vous êtes, et là où vous devez être, et courrez dans ce sens. » La vie chrétienne, c’est entendre les paroles de Dieu et les appliquer à nos vies—encore, et encore, et encore.
Jésus nous appelle à entendre ses mots, et lorsque nous obéissons à cet appel, il produit le miracle en nous. Priez. Persévérez. Proclamez l’évangile. Et n’arrêtez pas d’écouter sa voix. Devenez cette bonne terre ; devenez ceux qui ont entendu la parole avec un cœur honnête et bon, la retiennent et portent du fruit avec persévérance.
Related Media
Related Sermons